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MemberJames South

My primary areas of research are Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy, Ordinary Language Philosophy (especially the thought of Stanley Cavell), and Philosophy and Popular Culture. Much of my research to date in the history of philosophy has focused on issues associated with questions about cognition in later medieval philosophy, for example, intentionality, sensation and knowledge of the singular. The reason for this focus is my suspicion that the precise contours of Descartes’ indebtedness to Late Scholastic thought are still not well understood due to a failure to appreciate some distinctive turns made in discussions concerning the intellect in the 15th and 16th centuries. My writing on popular culture–tv shows, music, comic books, etc.–allows me to explore some interests I have in contemporary philosophy, including the social context in which philosophy finds itself. Recent published work includes an essay on Zabarella and regressus theory (in the Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal), an essay on comic book heroes and modernity in a volume of essays edited by William Irwin and Jorge Gracia, an essay on the Beatles and the practice of philosophy, an essay on Veronica Mars and Skepticism, and the volumes James Bond and Philosophy (co-edited with Jacob M. Held), Buffy Goes Dark (co-edited with Lynn Edwards and Elizabeth Rambo) and Mad Men and Philosophy (co-edited with Rod Carveth). My most recent published work, with Jacob M. Held is a co-edited book entitled Philosophy and Terry Pratchett for Palgrave-Macmillan. I sometimes blog at andphilosophy.com. For the last eleven years, I have edited the journal Philosophy and Theology. I have also begun coursework as an Academic Candidate at the Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute. You can find more information about my publications at my bepress.com site. I regularly teach undergraduate courses in Social and Political Philosophy. My interests there are directed at the development of the modern tradition of political thought from Machiavelli to Mill and the criticism of that tradition begun by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and others. I also regularly teach a course on the history and philosophy of crime and punishment. I have recently developed several new courses. One, “Philosophy and Popular Culture,” explores several philosophical issues associated with popular culture, while also looking closely at various ways of thinking about the discipline of philosophy. Another, “Philosophy and Film,” takes as its central text Stanley Cavell’s Cities of Words. Another, “Conceiving the Subject,” look at various texts from 20th century literature and thought to see how we can best approach the vexed question of the notion of ‘the subject.’ I am especially concerned in this course with making problematic the notion of ‘authenticity’ by focusing on several challenges stemming from the work of Freud, Wittgenstein, Adorno, and others. On the graduate level, I often teach a Plato course, specialized courses on Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (“Franciscan Philosophy,” “Humanism and Platonism in the Renaissance”), and a course on Marx and Moral Theory. Most recently, I developed a course on the thought of Cora Diamond and Stanley Cavell. For many years I taught a freshman seminar in the honors program on the work of Joss Whedon.

MemberJames M. Harland

I work on the history and archaeology of late antique and early medieval Western Europe, specifically Britain and Gaul, with a focus on processes of transformation and ethnic change. My broader interests lie in ethnic identity, transformation and continuity, and military and economic history, in addition to the philosophical and ethical implications of the study of these fields and their reception and misuse in the modern day, drawing upon continental philosophy and literary theory to explore these concerns. My doctoral thesis was a critical historiography of the study of ethnic identity through archaeological means in late and post-Roman Britain, making use of ethnic sociology and continental philosophy to examine and interrogate the epistemological foundations which underpin this subject of study. More information about my research, publications, CV and teaching can be found on my hcommons site, here.

MemberHilary Jane Locke

I’m a recent Masters graduate, living in Sydney. My Master of Philosophy degree focused on the presence of chivalry and courtly love in the courts of Henry VII and Henry VIII. And I wish to undertake a PhD, starting in 2019, exploring the relationship between historical fiction and the public’s perceptions of history.  I have taught courses on medieval and early modern religious history as well as revolutions in history. My research interests are Tudor England, medievalism, and historical popular culture and their depictions of the past.

MemberSean Hannan

Sean Hannan (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 2016) is an Assistant Professor in the Humanities at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. His research focuses on the intellectual history of Christianity, with emphases on late antiquity, North Africa, and the philosophy of time. While his doctoral project dealt with temporality in the works of Augustine of Hippo, his current research broadens out to incorporate alternative accounts of time drawn from antiquity and the Middle Ages. At MacEwan, he has a mandate to make use of methods from the digital humanities when teaching courses on ancient, medieval, and early modern history.

MemberAbigail Young

After finishing a Licentiate and PhD in mediaeval studies (specifically the history of mediaeval scritural exegesis), I found myself in non-traditional academic employment as a research associate at the Records of Early English Drama at the University of Toronto. There I honed my Latin and palaeographic skills, developed copy-editing skills, and learned to code C and HTML. But I found little time to give to the history of theology or exegesis, even to my chief interest, the Fourth Gospel. Now, in retirement, I am pursuing a long-desired goal of writing a commentary on that Gospel. It’s both a learning and a teaching experience.

MemberChristian Oertel

I am a medieval historian working preferably on the peripheries of medieval latin Europe (Scandinavia, Central Europe). I have written my PhD thesis on the cult and veneration of St Erik of Sweden following his way from a local saint around Uppsala in the late 12th century to the royal patron of the Swedish realm in the 15th. For my PostDoc project I turned to late medieval Bohemia and am currently working on the ruling praxis of Wenceslaus IV (“the Lazy”) during the last decade before his dethronement as king of the Holy Roman Empire.

MemberMads Langballe Jensen

I am a historian of early modern political thought, working on topics from the German Reformation to the Early Enlightenment and from Denmark/Norway to the Coast of West Africa. I am particularly interested in how different theories of natural law were used to justify and legitimise interests in different religious, political, commercial and colonial conflicts in early modern history.   My first project was a contextual study of the political philosophy of the Wittenberg reformer Philipp Melanchthon and the first formulations of Protestant natural law theories. It investigated the different theories of natural law which Melanchthon developed and the purposes for which he applied (or didn’t apply) them in his political philosophical works. An early fruit of this project was an article on Melanchthon’s commentary on Aristotle’s Politics published in History of Political Thought.

MemberAlexander D'Alisera

Welcome to my profile! I am an incoming Ph.D. student in medieval history at Boston College, set to begin my doctoral studies in the fall of 2019. From 2015 to 2017, I attended Yale University as a Marquand Scholar, where I received my M.A. in religion from the Divinity School. I also hold my B.A. in history and classics from Bard College, where I attended from 2011 to 2015 as an Excellence and Equal Cost Scholar. My current research interests include: Anglo-Saxon history, theology, and material culture; early Christian influences on medieval vernacular literature; classical reception in the Middle Ages; and Boethius’s influence on the Middle Ages. I also have extensive experience working in the publishing industry, having held editorial positions at Wiley-Blackwell, Yale Law School, and Harvard Medical School. At Academic Studies Press, I conceived and established the series Global Catholicism, one of the first book series dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of Catholicism in the Global South. At Yale Divinity School, I re-founded the previously defunct scholarly journal of religion Glossolalia, and served as its editor in chief from 2016 to 2019.