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MemberAllison Neal

Victorianist and Neo-Victorianist interested in Victorian Literature, History, Culture and Heritage; Contemporary literature and culture, and particularly its recent negotiations with the Victorian era through neo-Victorian appropriations of the long nineteenth century; the (de)construction of identities and societal roles, adaptation theory, paratexts and their transformations; the relationship between the classes in the past and present as depicted in literature, on film and television, along with Victorian and neo-Victorian pastiche, parody, and satire. My approach to research is interdisciplinary in nature and involves drawing on critical literary analysis, historical evidence, and postmodern theories of interpretation. And I have a cat called Victoria.

MemberSusan Zieger

I research and teach nineteenth-century British literature at the University of California, Riverside. My critical interests include popular media forms and the history of medicine. My first book, Inventing the Addict: Drugs, Race, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century British and American Literature (University of Massachusetts Press, 2008), was well-reviewed in Victorian Studies and other journals. I am currently revising my second book, Media Dreams: Ephemerality and Mass Culture in the Nineteenth Century. My articles and reviews have appeared in PMLA, Victorian Studies, American Literature, Literature Interpretation Theory, Genre, Cabinet, and other journals. I teach graduate seminars on affect in the nineteenth century novel, nineteenth-century media and literature, and the writings of Walter Benjamin.

MemberElizabeth Chang

Elizabeth Chang focuses in her research and teaching on the literature and visual culture of nineteenth-century Britain, with a particular emphasis on the cultural productions of the British empire during the Victorian era. Her monograph Britain’s Chinese Eye: Literature, Empire and Aesthetics in the Nineteenth Century (Stanford 2009) traces the cultural influences of Chinese places, things, and people, real and imagined, on the development of a modern British literary and visual culture in the nineteenth century. She is also the editor of a five-volume collection of nineteenth-century British travel writing from China (Pickering and Chatto 2010). Most recently she has published Novel Cultivations: Plants in British Literature of the Global Nineteenth Century (Virginia 2019), which takes up the role of plants as both setting and subject in the Victorian genre novel to argue for a reconfigured understanding of environmental agency in popular literature.

MemberRichard Fallon

I am an early career scholar of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century literature and culture, specialising in literature and science. My work has appeared in the Journal of Literature and Science (2018) and English Literature in Transition, 1880–1920 (2020). My PhD thesis, which examined the popularisation of dinosaur palaeontology in transatlantic literature during the decades around 1900, has since been built upon and revised into a monograph, which is currently under review. Contact: r.fallon@ucl.ac.uk