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MemberRob Collins

…Britain,’ in R. Varga and V. Rusu-Bolindet (ed.), Official Power and Local Elites in the Roman Provinces, London: Routledge, 127-144
2017      ‘Decline, collapse, or transformation? The case for the northern frontier of Britannia,’ in N. Roymans, S. Heeren, and W. Clerq (eds.) Social Dynamics in the Northwest Frontiers of the Late Roman Empire: Beyond Decline or Transformation, Amsterdam: University Press, 203-220
2015      ‘Economic reduction or military reorganisation? Demolition and conversion of granaries in the northern frontier of Britannia in the later 4th century’, in R Collins, M. Symonds & M. Weber (eds.), Roman Military Architecture on…

Rob is a lecturer in Archaeology in the School of History, Classics & Archaeology at Newcastle. Prior to joining Newcastle University, Rob was a Finds Liaison Officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberCarl R. Rice

I am currently a Ph.D. student in the combined doctoral program in Ancient History at Yale University. I explore the interactions between the Roman government and marginalized religious groups during the period known as Late Antiquity (c. 150-700 CE).  My chief interest lies in how and why those relationships changed as the Roman empire became increasingly Christianized throughout that period.  I seek to better understand where, when, and why the Roman government (whether Christian or non-Christian) used violence to police and enforce religious norms and identities. I also examine other means (such as law, ritual, and architecture) the government employed to reinforce these normative religious identities.  I am also interested in gender and sexuality studies in the Roman world. Please feel free to contact me at carl.rice@yale.edu with any questions.

MemberChristian Oertel

I am a medieval historian working preferably on the peripheries of medieval latin Europe (Scandinavia, Central Europe). I have written my PhD thesis on the cult and veneration of St Erik of Sweden following his way from a local saint around Uppsala in the late 12th century to the royal patron of the Swedish realm in the 15th. For my PostDoc project I turned to late medieval Bohemia and am currently working on the ruling praxis of Wenceslaus IV (“the Lazy”) during the last decade before his dethronement as king of the Holy Roman Empire.

MemberCatherine Bonesho

… Eric Orlin, Lisbeth Fried, Jennifer Wright Knust, Michael Pregill, and Michael Satlow, Routledge, Dec. 2015.
 
Manuscripts in Submission
“Aesthetics of Empire: Material Presentation of Palmyrene Aramaic and Latin Bilingual Inscriptions,” Maarav.
 

Public Outreach Publications:
“The Jewish Holiday of Purim in the Late Roman Empire.”
“An Interview with John Ochsendorf, New Director of the American Academy in Rome.”
“Preserving the Words of Ancient Palmyra Through Digital Humanities.”
“Roma, Amor: Inside the Column of Trajan and Under the Pantheon Oculus.”
“Sites of Memory and Memories of Conflict: Imperial Rome, Jerusalem, and N…

I am currently an Assistant Professor in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. In 2017-2018 I was the Emeline Hill Richardson Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome. I received my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East.

MemberHenry Colburn

My research focuses on the art and archaeology of ancient Iran, and on the regions of the Near East, Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia that interacted with Iran prior to the advent of Islam. I am especially interested in reconstructing the social, cultural, political and even economic environments in which objects were created. I am also interested in how our modern knowledge of the ancient world was created, since this affects how we interpret objects and the conclusions we draw about the people who made them. I have held fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums and the Getty Research Institute, and teaching positions at the University of California, Irvine and the University of Southern California. I am now the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow in Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

MemberAlan J. Ross

I’m a Classicist who works primarily on the secular prose literature and history of the fourth century AD. I teach Roman History at the University of Southampton, where I’m part of a team that’s recently launched a new Ancient History BA Programme, bringing the teaching of the ancient world at degree level back to Southampton after a hiatus of 30 years. Additionally, I’m a Visiting Research Fellow in the School of Classics at University College Dublin, and a Member of the Ancient World Research Cluster at Wolfson College, Oxford.

MemberMark Letteney

I joined Princeton’s program in the Religions of Mediterranean Antiquity in 2014 after receiving a MAR in the History of Christianity from Yale Divinity School and degrees in Religious Studies and Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My dissertation, titled “Christianizing Knowledge: a new order of books in the Theodosian Age”, changes to documentary practice and readerly expectations across elite technical literature from the late fourth through the middle of the fifth century CE. In it, I bring together Roman legal sources, “patristic” theological tractates, conciliar acta, and the emergence of the genre of Talmud to demonstrate convergences between these corpora on a structural level, and to argue that jurists, bishops, and rabbis approached their task of commentary and codification with analogous prejudices and expectations about what documents are, what they do, and how they are to be used. This project approaches the question of “Christianization” beyond a sunday morning headcount, examining the effect of Christianity on structures of knolwedge in the later Roman empire. I am co-director of the Solomon’s Pools Archaeological Project, as well as a field archaeologist with the Jezreel Valley Regional Project, focusing on excavation of the Roman 6th Legion “Ferrata” castrum in Legio, Israel.t For the 2018-9 academic year I will be in residence at the American Academy in Rome as the Paul Mellon/Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize winner. My CV is available here.

MemberEvan Jewell

I am a Ph.D. candidate (ABD) in the interdepartmental Classical Studies program at Columbia University, currently writing a dissertation entitled, “Youth and Power: Roman Discourses of Age and Ageing from Plautus to Nero.” My work examines Roman age and ageing and, in particular, the intersection of discourses about youth with the changing power relations at Rome from the birth of Plautus to the death of Nero.