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MemberBrett M. Neilson

I am Research Director at the Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney (http://www.uws.edu.au/ics/people/researchers/brett_neilson). Currently I coordinate the transnational research projects Transit Labour (http://transitlabour.asia) and Logistical Worlds (http://logisticalworlds.org). My main interests are in interdisciplinary studies of culture and society with a focus on borders, migration, labor, political theory and digital transformations. I have a disused blog at http://aldiqua.blogspot.com.au/ (one day I might even update it).

MemberDuncan Money

I am a historian of central and southern Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and I work at Leiden University in the Netherlands. Primarily my research looks at the history of the mining industry and I mostly research and write about the Zambian Copperbelt. My main areas of interest are histories of labour, race and global connections. Currently, I am a researcher at the African Studies Centre Leiden and before this I was a postdoctoral fellow at the International Studies Group, University of the Free State, South Africa.

MemberMartha Shearer

Martha Shearer’s research interests are in cinema and urban studies, particularly the relationship between processes of urban development and cinematic modes of representation; American cinema, from the coming of sound to the present; genre, especially the musical, romantic comedy, and horror; and gender, both in terms of representation and women’s authorship and creative labour. Her book New York City and the Hollywood Musical: Dancing in the Streets, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2016, develops an innovative understanding of the spatiality of the musical, grounding close readings of films in the history and geography of both New York and the film industry. It argues that at its peak the musical was a prime vehicle for the idealization of urban density and that the transformation that New York underwent after World War II constituted a major challenge to the genre’s representational strategies, leading to its eventual decline. Her current research focuses on real estate and contemporary American cinema and television, particularly since 2008, exploring the ways in which real estate and its logics underpin both media industries and various forms of contemporary American film and media texts. She is also co-editing two books. Musicals at the Margins: Genre, Boundaries Canons, co-edited with Julie Lobalzo Wright, focuses on films and media at the margins and boundaries of the musical genre in a range of historical and global contexts and seeks to rework not only theories of the musical but also theories of genre more broadly. Women and New Hollywood, co-edited with Aaron Hunter, focuses on women’s creative labour in American cinema of the 1970s, recuperating the labour of women working as directors and other creative roles, but also considering how attention to that labour challenges the thoroughly masculinist understanding of that period of American cinema and reframes theories of women’s authorship. This latter project is based on a conference held at Maynooth University in 2018.

MemberThomas Barker

I’m currently Associate Professor and Head of Film and Television at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and Deputy Director of the Centre for the Study of Communication and Culture (CSCC). I am a sociologist by training with expertise in cultural and creative industries, especially cinema, with a focus on Malaysia and Indonesia. I have written on Islamic pop culture, new media, cinema, film, creative labour, Chinese transnationalism, and cinematic history of Southeast Asia. Previously I was a Visiting Research Fellow at National Cheng Chi University (2018), Visiting Scholar at the Department of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA (2016), a Visiting Researcher at PUSKAKOM Universitas Indonesia (2015), and a Visiting Scholar at the Department of Sociology National University of Singapore (2011).