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MemberRebecca Haidt

18th-19th C cultures, literatures; comparative studies; gender, sexuality; material culture; cultural history; Spain; Spain-Cuba and Spain-North Africa 18th-19th centuries; convict transport history; labor history and history of women’s work; fashion and costume history; Madrid; Iberian studies; Enlightenment; book history; translation; media studies; popular culture; popular theatre; prose fiction; European literary history; history of ideas.

MemberSheshalatha Reddy

Sheshalatha Reddy is an Associate Professor at Howard University where she teaches colonial and postcolonial British and Anglophone literature. She has published articles in Victorian Literature and Culture and the Journal of Commonwealth Literature and edited an anthology entitled Mapping the Nation: An Anthology of Indian Poetry in English, 1870-1920 (2012). Her recent book, British Empire and the Literature of Rebellion: Revolting Bodies, Laboring Subjects (2017) is a a comparative study of the discourses surrounding three roughly mid-nineteenth century rebellions: the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857 in India, the Morant Bay Rebellion of 1865 in Jamaica, and the Fenian Rebellion of 1867 in Ireland. Following the industrial capitalist revolution in England, British imperial capitalism sought to expand its laboring force by attempting to transfigure the oppressed colonized worker into a laboring subject (one whose identity would be created and limited by labor) through the deployment of biopolitics, the disciplinary techniques of states and corporations to manage and regulate populations. Revolting Bodies, Laboring Subjects argues that the supposedly unsuccessful rebellions in India, Jamaica and Ireland can be read as flashpoints in imperial labor history: a moment when the colonized reacted against early attempts by British imperial capitalism to create a new pool of labor for capitalist accumulation in the colonies. These rebellions thus marked a shift in the driving impetus behind revolt against British authority as the colonized now began to resist a new regime of biopower that attempted not merely to exploit them as workers, but to transform them into urban and rural laboring subjects, sources of capitalist accumulation. This transformation would always remain incomplete since it was always resisted to varying degrees by the colonized.

MemberCait Coker

Formerly of special collections at Texas A&M, with specializations in Book History and in Science Fiction, I decamped and am a current doctoral candidate in English. My work uses empirical and enumerative bibliography to recover the labors of women in the book trades in the seventeenth century, and using book history to recontextualize theories of genre writing.

MemberNikos Pegioudis

Nikos Pegioudis is an art historian. He has received his PhD from the Department of History of Art at University College London (UCL) in 2015 with a dissertation titled ‘Artists and Radicalism in Germany, 1890-1933: Reform, Politics and the Paradoxes of the Avant-Garde’. In 2017-2018 he obtained a DAAD fellowship for a postodoctoral research project at the Freie Universität Berlin which was titled ‘Cultural Transfer in Architecture and Urban Planning: German Architecture and the Making of the Architect’s Profession in Greece, 1930-1950’. He has written various articles on the history of art, design and architecture in peer-reviewed academic journals and volumes. His main research interests are in German and Greek visual culture, architecture, the sociology of the avant-garde, politics of artistic professions, artistic labor and economic precarity.

MemberSusan Grunewald

I am a Ph.D. candidate in History at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. My dissertation examines German prisoners of war in the Soviet Union from 1941-1956. I am interested in how they were treated, why they were held for so long, and their role in the Soviet forced labor economy. To access their labor contribution, I digitally map the camp locations with regards to resources and infrastructure developments with the program ArcGIS. The role of the POWs in the early stages of the Cold War is also a major part of my research.

MemberEric Nystrom

I am interested in the history of technology, particularly those histories at the intersection of visual culture and work. In Seeing Underground: Maps, Models, and Mining Engineering in America (2014), I examined the development and use of visual tools such as underground maps, photographs, and 3-D models by American mining engineers in the late 19th and early 20th century. These visual tools helped mining engineers exercise their authority over work, and together with new technologies, enabled them to shape and reshape mining labor and the mining landscape. I am also keenly interested in public history (especially the histories of institutions such as parks and museums), and digital history (particularly text mining, distant reading, and population microdata). Prior to joining Arizona State, I was assistant and associate professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York (2007-2015).

MemberBryan Wagner

My primary research focuses on African American expression in the context of slavery and its aftermath. I have secondary interests in legal history, cultural theory, and popular music. My first book, Disturbing the Peace: Black Culture and the Police Power after Slavery, a study of black vernacular expression and its entanglement with the law, was published by Harvard University Press in 2009. I’m currently working on two books: Fables of Moral Economy, a close analysis of African-derived global traditions engaged with problems of property and subsistence, and Fugitives, Contrabands, Spies, Servants & Laborers, an experiment in historiography that imagines the new social history of slavery from the standpoint of its source materials.

MemberBess Williamson

Bess Williamson is a historian of design and material culture, focusing primarily on works and influences of the last half-century. She received her PhD in American History from the University of Delaware, and holds a Masters in the History of Design and Decorative Arts from Parsons The New School for Design/Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. She is particularly interested in social and political concerns in design, including environmental, labor, justice, and rights issues as they shape and are shaped by spaces and things. Her current book project, Designing an Accessible America, traces the history of design responses to disability rights from 1945 to recent times. Her writing has appeared in Winterthur Portfolio and American Studies, with reviews in Design and Culture and Design Issues. At SAIC, Williamson teaches a range of design history courses, from introductory surveys of modern design history to graduate seminars on issues in design, politics, and technology. She is the coordinator of design history offerings in SAIC’s Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism.