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MemberRebecca Haidt

18th-19th C cultures, literatures; comparative studies; gender, sexuality; material culture; cultural history; Spain; Spain-Cuba and Spain-North Africa 18th-19th centuries; convict transport history; labor history and history of women’s work; fashion and costume history; Madrid; Iberian studies; Enlightenment; book history; translation; media studies; popular culture; popular theatre; prose fiction; European literary history; history of ideas.

MemberPeter Filardo

…Bibliographies:

“Labor History Bibliography” – an annual bibliography published, from 1989-2000, in the journal Labor History

“United States Communist History” (2002– ) an annual bibliography published in the journal American Communist History

“Twentieth Century Communist History (2019– ) an annual bibliography published in the journal Twentieth Century Communism

Edited works

Articles

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Retired archivist, formerly at the Tamiment Library. NYU, from 1989-2012, specializing in left and communist history.

MemberSheshalatha Reddy

Sheshalatha Reddy is an Associate Professor at Howard University where she teaches colonial and postcolonial British and Anglophone literature. She has published articles in Victorian Literature and Culture and the Journal of Commonwealth Literature and edited an anthology entitled Mapping the Nation: An Anthology of Indian Poetry in English, 1870-1920 (2012). Her recent book, British Empire and the Literature of Rebellion: Revolting Bodies, Laboring Subjects (2017) is a a comparative study of the discourses surrounding three roughly mid-nineteenth century rebellions: the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857 in India, the Morant Bay Rebellion of 1865 in Jamaica, and the Fenian Rebellion of 1867 in Ireland. Following the industrial capitalist revolution in England, British imperial capitalism sought to expand its laboring force by attempting to transfigure the oppressed colonized worker into a laboring subject (one whose identity would be created and limited by labor) through the deployment of biopolitics, the disciplinary techniques of states and corporations to manage and regulate populations. Revolting Bodies, Laboring Subjects argues that the supposedly unsuccessful rebellions in India, Jamaica and Ireland can be read as flashpoints in imperial labor history: a moment when the colonized reacted against early attempts by British imperial capitalism to create a new pool of labor for capitalist accumulation in the colonies. These rebellions thus marked a shift in the driving impetus behind revolt against British authority as the colonized now began to resist a new regime of biopower that attempted not merely to exploit them as workers, but to transform them into urban and rural laboring subjects, sources of capitalist accumulation. This transformation would always remain incomplete since it was always resisted to varying degrees by the colonized.

MemberJennifer Hart

Jennifer Hart is an Associate Professor at Wayne State University, where she teaches courses in African History, World History, Digital Humanities, Digital History, History Communication, and the History of Technology.  Her research explores the intersection of histories of labor, technology, and urban space in Accra, Ghana.  She is the North American President of the International Society for the Scholarship on Teaching and Learning and History.

MemberCait Coker

Formerly of special collections at Texas A&M, with specializations in Book History and in Science Fiction, I decamped and am a current doctoral candidate in English. My work uses empirical and enumerative bibliography to recover the labors of women in the book trades in the seventeenth century, and using book history to recontextualize theories of genre writing.

MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. Recently, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Michigan Society of Fellows and the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. At Texas Tech, she teaches undergraduate and masters courses in archaeology and classics and is also affiliated with the anthropology program.

MemberNikos Pegioudis

Nikos Pegioudis is an art historian. He has received his PhD from the Department of History of Art at University College London (UCL) in 2015 with a dissertation titled ‘Artists and Radicalism in Germany, 1890-1933: Reform, Politics and the Paradoxes of the Avant-Garde’. In 2017-2018 he obtained a DAAD fellowship for a postodoctoral research project at the Freie Universität Berlin which was titled ‘Cultural Transfer in Architecture and Urban Planning: German Architecture and the Making of the Architect’s Profession in Greece, 1930-1950’. He has written various articles on the history of art, design and architecture in peer-reviewed academic journals and volumes. His main research interests are in German and Greek visual culture, architecture, the sociology of the avant-garde, politics of artistic professions, artistic labor and economic precarity.