Search

MemberMarc Bregman


l968-l969 Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion,

Cincinnati. Rabbinic Studies.

 

l969-l970 Brown University, Providence. Graduate Student in

Religious Studies.

 

l970-l971 Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion,

Los Angeles. Judaic Studies.

M.A. l971

 

l972-1983 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Research Student,

Hebrew Literature: Midrash and Aggadah.

 

l983-1990 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Doctoral Candidate.

Ph.D. 1991…

Marc Bregman Brief Biography January 2018     Marc Bregman received his Ph.D. from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1991. He taught at the Hebrew Union College (Jerusalem), The Hebrew University in Jerusalem, the Schechter Institute for Judaic Studies in Jerusalem, and at the Ben-Gurion University in Beer Sheba, Israel. During 1993 he was Visiting Associate Professor at Yale University, and during 1996 he was the Stroum Professor of Jewish Studies and Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle. During 2005, Bregman served as the Harry Starr Fellow in Judaica at Harvard University and was awarded a Teaching Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He also has served as Forchheimer Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. His book in Hebrew, The Tanhuma-Yelammedenu Literature: Studies in the Evolution of the Versions (Gorgias Press, 2003), has been hailed as “undoubtedly the best research ever done about the most complicated issue in the study of rabbinic literature”. In 2006, Bregman was appointed the Herman and Zelda Bernard Distinguished Professor of Jewish Studies at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, where he also headed the program in Jewish Studies, until 2013. Bregman retired from UNCG as of July 31, 2017. He has now returned to Jerusalem where he is continuing his research and teaching activities. He may be contacted by email at marc.bregman@gmail.com.

MemberYael Landman

Hebrew Bible; ancient Near East; biblical, cuneiform, and early Jewish law; law and literature; Semitic linguistics My work examines the Hebrew Bible in comparison with ancient Near Eastern sources and draws on contemporary legal and literary theory and linguistics, with further recourse to ancient Jewish sources and medieval exegesis. I am currently transforming my dissertation into a book entitled Legal Practice, Legal Writing: The Biblical Bailment Law and Divine Justice.  I am Acquisitions Editor of Hebrew Bible, Ancient Near East, and Jewish Studies at Gorgias Press. If you are interested in submitting a proposal, email me at yael@gorgiaspress.com. I am currently Visiting Research Fellow in Judaic Studies at CUNY Brooklyn College.

MemberJonathan Schmidt-Swartz

…2021 (expected)
Ph.D., New York University, New York, NY
Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies
Concentration: Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East
Dissertation: “Recasting Kingship: Power, Disrupted History, and Scribal Adaptation”
Committee: Daniel E. Fleming (chair); Mark S. Smith

2019
M.Phil., New York University, New York, NY
Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies

2015
A.B. summa cum laude, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Majors: Comparative Literature and Religious Studies
Minors: Near Eastern Studies and Je…

Jonathan Schmidt-Swartz is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University focusing on Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East. His primary research interests and dissertation focus broadly on the intersection of ancient scribal culture, critical theory, and kingship. More specifically, his dissertation aims to trace the intellectual history and historiography of kingship in more concrete terms, namely, by determining how post-monarchic scribes reinterpreted sources they inherited; how the juxtapositions of monarchic sources to their post-monarchic framings entails a two-way reinterpretation between older and newer texts. Unlike previous studies on the history of kingship in Israel-Judah, his work seeks to unpack the differing notions of kingship — the power dynamics between the king, Yahweh, and the people — through the lens of specific scribal practices as his guiding method. His objective is to understand, recognize, and begin to pull apart the layered conceptions of kingship on display in the Bible’s primary narrative about the kingdoms and recognize at once the conscious diachronic juxtaposition of sources by scribes and their synchronic multivalent unity. Dissertation: Recasting Kingship: Power, Disrupted History, and Scribal Adaptation Interests: Hebrew Bible, Ancient Near East, Critical Theory, Scribal Culture, Religious Studies/History of Religions, History/Historiography, Jewish Studies, Interdisciplinary Humanities, Public Humanities

MemberLiran Yadgar

Dr. Liran Yadgar, the UCLA Viterbi Visiting Professor/Postdoctoral Scholar in Mediterranean Jewish Studies, earned his B.A. and M.A. from Tel Aviv University, and received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2016. His research examines the history of Jewish communities in the Mamluk Sultanate of Egypt and Syria (1250-1517), and Jewish-Muslim interaction and intellectual exchange during the Late Middle Islamic Period. He currently is working on his first book about the representations and knowledge of Jews, Judaism, and the Hebrew Bible in the works of two prominent theologians of fourteenth-century Damascus, Ibn Taymiyya and Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya. Previously Yadgar served as the Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Postdoctoral Associate in the Judaic Studies Program of Yale University. Email: yadgar@humnet.ucla.edu Academia.com homepage: https://ucla.academia.edu/LiranYadgar The Viterbi Family Program in Mediterranean Jewish Studies: http://www.cjs.ucla.edu/mediterranean-studies/