Search

MemberJonathan Sarna

…University Professor and Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Prof. Of American Jewish History…
… General Grant Expelled the Jews.  Schocken/Nextbook, 2012. [Finalist, National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies, 2012].
 
Jewish Renaissance and Revival in America, Coedited with Eitan Fishbane.  Brandeis University Press/UPNE, 2011.
 
New Essays in American Jewish History [Commemorating 60th Anniversary of American Jewish Archives].  Coedited with Pamela S. Nadell and Lance J. Sussman.  Ktav/AJA, 2010.
 
Jews and the Civil War:  A Reader.  With Adam Mendelsohn.  NYU Press, 2010.
 
A Time to Every Purpose:  Letters to a …

Jonathan D. Sarna is spending this year as a fellow of the Israel Institute for Advanced Studies.  Ordinarily he serves as University Professor and the Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University, where he chairs its Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program. He also is the past president of the Association for Jewish Studies and Chief Historian of the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia.  Author or editor of more than thirty books on American Jewish history and life, his American Judaism: A History won six awards including the 2004 “Everett Jewish Book of the Year Award” from the Jewish Book Council. Sarna is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Academy of Jewish Research. His most recent books are When General Grant Expelled the Jews and Lincoln & the Jews: A History (with Benjamin Shapell), which has just appeared in a Hebrew edition. 

MemberHelen Spurling

My research focuses on the interpretation of midrashic literature, with particular reference to Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim relations, Jewish history from biblical times to Late Antiquity, and apocalypticism and eschatology. Following a BA in Theology and an MPhil in Hebrew Bible, I completed my PhD at Christ’s College, University of Cambridge, examining Jewish apocalyptic texts as a response to the emergence of Islam. I then worked as a Research Associate first at the University of Sheffield (2003-2005) and then the University of Cambridge (2005-2009) before joining the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations in 2009.

MemberPhillip Webster

I use the study of early forms of Christianity and Judaism to tease out the applications and potentialities of various theoretical approaches and questions, including those inspired by “New Materialism,” Feminist, Transgender, and Queer Theory, M. Foucault, phenomenology, and Science and Technology Studies. My book project examines references to the soul in Greek and Roman antiquity, with the aim of exploring the effects, functions, and power of the ancient soul’s phantom-like presence upon ancient bodies. In my teaching, I like to introduce my students to big, interdisciplinary questions through the study of early Christian and Jewish histories and their receptions in modernity.

MemberAdrienne Williams Boyarin

Adrienne Williams Boyarin (PhD UC Berkeley, 2006) is Associate Professor of English and English Graduate Program Advisor at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. She is author of Miracles of the Virgin in Medieval England: Law and Jewishness in Marian Legends (D.S. Brewer 2010), praised as “elegantly written, scrupulously researched,” and a model of “codicological expertise” (Speculum 88.1, 2013). She is editor and translator of the alliterative Siege of Jerusalem (Broadview 2013, rev. in TLS) and Miracles of the Virgin in Middle English (Broadview 2015, rev. in TMR), and the founding Executive Editor of the journal Early Middle English (Arc Humanities/Amsterdam UP). Her research interests include Jewish-Christian polemics, medieval Anglo-Jewish history, Early Middle English (and the multilingual Early Middle English period broadly), manuscript studies, Marian texts, and gender studies. She is a former member of the MLA Executive Committee for TC Religion and Literature (2014-2019) and the MLA Delegate Assembly (2017-2019).  

MemberSean Burrus

…Duke University, Department of Religious Studies February, 2017
Ph.D., Perilman Fellow in Religious Studies
Concentration in Jewish History
Dissertation: “Remembering the Righteous: Sarcophagus Sculpture and Jewish Identity in the Roman World”
Minor Fields: Classical Studies, Anthropology, Hebrew Bible

Duke University, Department of Religious Studies May, 2012
M.A., Religious Studies

Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rothberg Institute 2009
Post-Graduate Studies
Concentration: Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic

University of North Carolina, C…

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.

MemberClaire Le Foll

I am Associate Professor of East European Jewish History and Culture at the University of Southampton, G.B., where I have worked since 2009. I work on the history and culture of Jews in Eastern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, and more specifically on the history of Jews in Belarus. My current research project deals with the national experiments in Lithuania, Belorussia and Ukraine from 1905 to 1941, and in particular how national-cultural autonomy was implemented in these emerging republics. I am conducting research on the cultural interactions in literature, art, theatre, cinema and on the circulation of knowledge among various ethnic groups (Jews, Belorussians, Poles, Ukrainians, etc) and geographic areas (Poland, Russia and the previous margins of the Russian empire – Ukraine, Belarus). I recently published a book on La Biélorussie dans l’histoire et l’imaginaire des Juifs de l’Empire russe, 1772-1905 (Belarus in the history and imaginary of Russian Jews, 1772-1905) and am currently working on illustrations of Yiddish journals and books in Soviet Belorussia.