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MemberKristian Petersen

Kristian Petersen is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. His intellectual interests include Theory and Method in the Study of Religion, Islamic Studies, Chinese Religions, and Media Studies. He is host of the New Books in Religion and New Books in Islamic Studies podcasts. He is the author of Interpreting Islam in China: Pilgrimage, Scripture, and Language in the Han Kitab (Oxford University Press, 2017). He is currently writing a monograph entitled The Cinematic Lives of Muslims and working as part of the team developing De Gruyter’s new series, Introductions to Digital Humanities: Religion.

MemberLauren Osborne

My interests revolve broadly around perception and experience of religious texts. My areas of specialization include Islamic Studies, the Qur’an and Qur’anic Studies, Islam and music, and Sensory Studies in the study of religion. My current project is a book on meaning and experience across the sound, text, and performance of the recited Qur’an called, Recite! Aesthetics and Experience of the Recited Qur’an. In this work, I take a combined hermeneutic and ethnographic approach in considering the recited Qur’an in a wide range of contexts, illuminating the theoretical possibilities for interrelationships and discontinuities between different realms of meaning. In my research and teaching more broadly, I am interested in interactions between discursive and non-discursive meanings of religious texts—the Qur’an most specifically—, as well as sense experience within Islamic Studies and Religious Studies. I am currently the co-chair of the Qur’an Unit in the American Academy of Religion.

MemberJosef Meri

Born in the United States Prof. Meri hails from a Jerusalemite family. Meri is presently a faculty member of the College of Islamic Studies, Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, Qatar. He is also Faculty Associate (non-resident) at the Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations, Merrimack College, U.S.A. From 2014-2015 he was Visiting Professor in the Department of Studies of Islam in the Contemporary World at the University of Jordan. During the 2013-2014 academic year Meri served as 8th Allianz Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at the Ludwig Maximilians-University of Munich. From 2011-2014 he was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre of Islamic Studies, Cambridge University. From June 2010-March 2013 he was Fellow of St. Edmund’s College, Cambridge University and served as Academic Director of the Centre for the Study of Muslim-Jewish Relations, Woolf Institute, Cambridge. He has travelled extensively throughout the Middle East and Europe and has lived in Oxford, London, Cambridge, Munich, Amman, Cairo, Damascus and Jerusalem. From 2005-2010 he lived in Amman, where he oversaw a major Qur’anic exegesis project at the Jordanian Royal Court. He previously held visiting appointments at the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London and the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Meri is a historian of interfaith relations in the Middle East in past and present, a historian of religions, and a specialist in medieval Islamic history and civilisation. Prof. Meri’s research interests include: Muslim-non-Muslim relations in the medieval and modern Middle East, Pilgrimage and the Veneration of Saints and Relics in Islam, Judaism and Christianity; Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Popular Religion; History of the Jews of Arab Lands. His teaching interests include: Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Pilgrimage in Islam and Judaism; Medieval Islamic History and Civilisation; Travel, Hajj and Ziyara; History of Sacred Places in the Middle East; the Jewish communities of the Islamic World; Bibliographic Methods in the Study of the Abrahamic Religions, Autobiographical Writings of Middle Eastern Jews, Christians and Muslims. Prof. Meri served as Editor of the Routledge Handbook of Muslim-Jewish Relations (2016), a major academic resource for the academic study of Muslim-Jewish Relations. His publications include: (ed.) Jewish-Muslim Relations in Past and Present: A Kaleidoscopic View (Leiden: Brill, 2017), (ed.) Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia, 2 vols. (reissue with updated bibliographies and new preface) (Abingdon, Oxon. and New York: Routledge, 2017), and a new revised translation of Al-Ghazali, The Correct Balance (2019). His forthcoming publications include: Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Islam (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press) and A History of Interfaith Relations in the Middle East and Mediterranean (Toronto: University of Toronto Press). He previously served as Founding Advisory Board Member (Islamic Studies), Oxford Bibliographies On-line (2008-2010), General Editor of Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (2002-2005), Series Editor of the Great Tafsirs of the Holy Qur’an series (Fons Vitae Publishers, USA with Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought, Amman, Jordan)(2005-2010), Section Editor (Islam) of Wiley-Blackwell’s Religion Compass (2005-2010) and Book Review Editor (Medieval Islamic and Jewish Studies), Speculum, published by the Medieval Academy of America (2007-2012) and Founding Editor of Intertwined Worlds (2010-2013), an e-platform dedicated to the academic study of Muslim-Jewish and Muslim-Jewish-Christian Relations.

MemberDale J. Correa

…PhD, New York University, Middle East & Islamic Studies

MA, New York University, Middle East & Islamic Studies

MSLIS, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Special Collections

AB, Dartmouth College, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies

Certificate, Center for Arabic Study Abroad (Cairo)…

Dale J. Correa, PhD, is the Middle Eastern Studies Librarian and History Coordinator for the University of Texas Libraries, the University of Texas at Austin. She serves as the liaison to the Department of History, the Department and Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and the Islamic Studies Program. Dr. Correa specializes in Islamic legal theory, theology,  philosophy, and Qur’anic studies, with a particular interest in the intellectual tradition of the eastern regions of the Islamicate empire (namely, Transoxania, which is today in Uzbekistan/Tajikistan). Her research, although rooted in the 10th-12th centuries CE, extends to contemporary conceptions of what it means to be Muslim, particularly in Eurasia. Her current book project examines the development and flourishing of the Transoxanian approach to testimony, or communication: that is, the transmission of knowledge of a past event by agents over time and space. This study brings together Qur’anic exegesis, Islamic legal theory, and Islamic theology with contemporary approaches to epistemology, philosophy of language and the mind, and logic to examine the consequences of positing epistemology as a confessional boundary.

MemberEdmund Hayes

  Edmund Hayes is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Leiden. He gained his doctorate with honours from the department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago in June 2015. He works on early Islamic history, in particular Shiʿi history, focusing on the intersection of intellectual developments and social and political dynamics. He also has interests in group dynamics, ethnicity, and gender and sexuality.   He is working on a book  entitled Agents of the Hidden Imam: the Birth Pangs of Twelver Shiʿism, 850-950 CE. He has published, or has articles forthcoming in Iranian Studies, Comparative Islamic Studies and the Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies.   He is  investigating letters as a case-study in the embodiment of authority in pre-modern society. In particular, he uses a comparative perspective to place Shiʿi excommunication letters from the Imams within a typology of excommunication and anathematization practices in Jewish, Christian, Zoroastrian and Muslim (Shiʿi and Sunni) communities. This allows us to understand how the ecclesiastical punishment of excommunication can complement, replace or subvert coercive governmental power. He is also looking at tax-demand letters and the relationship between fiscal policy and religious protest in early Islam. This involves  investigating  the development of Islamic canonical revenues, ghanīma, fayʾ, kharāj, khums, anfāl, ṣadaqa, and zakāt, the ways in which these terms overlap and relate to each other, and the ways in which they were both practically applied and conceptualized by early Islamic jurists and thinkers.  

MemberIlyse Morgenstein Fuerst

“Made by Committee: How Academic Job Ads Reify and Shape Islamic Studies,” forthcoming conference paper at AAR 2018, and article-in-process….
…Volume

Shifting Boundaries: The Study of Islam in the Humanities, special edition of Muslim World, Volume
106, Number 4 (October 2016). Co-edited with Zahra M. S. Ayubi.
 

Refereed Journal Articles

“Locating Religion in South Asia: Islamicate Definitions and Categories,” Comparative Islamic Studies,
Volume 10, no. 2 (2017): 217-241.
“Shifting Boundaries: the Study of Islam in the Humanities,” Muslim World, Volume 106,
Number 4 (October 2016): 643-654. Co-authored with Zahra M. S. Ayubi.
“A Muslim Bhagavadgita: ‘Abd al-Rahman’s Interpretive Translation and its Imp…

I am Ilyse R. Morgenstein Fuerst and, yes, that whole bit after the R. is my surname. I’m an assistant professor of religion and the current director of Middle East studies at the University of Vermont. I’m also the co-chair of the Study of Islam Unit at the American Academy of Religion, the editor of the Islam section for Religion Compass, and on various editorial and advisory boards for Islamic studies journals and projects. Generally speaking, my published work addresses South Asian Islam, theories and history of religion, and the racialization of Islam. My first book, Indian Muslim Minorities and the 1857 Rebellion, was published by I.B. Tauris in 2017. I’m working on other projects, mostly around boundaries of the study of Islam, memorialization of Islamic history in South Asia, and histories of Islamophobia and the racialization of Muslims.