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MemberJosef Meri

Born in the United States Prof. Meri hails from a Jerusalemite family. Meri is presently a faculty member of the College of Islamic Studies, Hamad Bin Khalifa University in Doha, Qatar. He is also Faculty Associate (non-resident) at the Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations, Merrimack College, U.S.A. From 2014-2015 he was Visiting Professor in the Department of Studies of Islam in the Contemporary World at the University of Jordan. During the 2013-2014 academic year Meri served as 8th Allianz Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at the Ludwig Maximilians-University of Munich. From 2011-2014 he was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre of Islamic Studies, Cambridge University. From June 2010-March 2013 he was Fellow of St. Edmund’s College, Cambridge University and served as Academic Director of the Centre for the Study of Muslim-Jewish Relations, Woolf Institute, Cambridge. He has travelled extensively throughout the Middle East and Europe and has lived in Oxford, London, Cambridge, Munich, Amman, Cairo, Damascus and Jerusalem. From 2005-2010 he lived in Amman, where he oversaw a major Qur’anic exegesis project at the Jordanian Royal Court. He previously held visiting appointments at the Institute of Ismaili Studies in London and the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Meri is a historian of interfaith relations in the Middle East in past and present, a historian of religions, and a specialist in medieval Islamic history and civilisation. Prof. Meri’s research interests include: Muslim-non-Muslim relations in the medieval and modern Middle East, Pilgrimage and the Veneration of Saints and Relics in Islam, Judaism and Christianity; Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Popular Religion; History of the Jews of Arab Lands. His teaching interests include: Ritual in Islam and Judaism; Pilgrimage in Islam and Judaism; Medieval Islamic History and Civilisation; Travel, Hajj and Ziyara; History of Sacred Places in the Middle East; the Jewish communities of the Islamic World; Bibliographic Methods in the Study of the Abrahamic Religions, Autobiographical Writings of Middle Eastern Jews, Christians and Muslims. Prof. Meri served as Editor of the Routledge Handbook of Muslim-Jewish Relations (2016), a major academic resource for the academic study of Muslim-Jewish Relations. His publications include: (ed.) Jewish-Muslim Relations in Past and Present: A Kaleidoscopic View (Leiden: Brill, 2017), (ed.) Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia, 2 vols. (reissue with updated bibliographies and new preface) (Abingdon, Oxon. and New York: Routledge, 2017), and a new revised translation of Al-Ghazali, The Correct Balance (2019). His forthcoming publications include: Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Islam (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press) and A History of Interfaith Relations in the Middle East and Mediterranean (Toronto: University of Toronto Press). He previously served as Founding Advisory Board Member (Islamic Studies), Oxford Bibliographies On-line (2008-2010), General Editor of Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (2002-2005), Series Editor of the Great Tafsirs of the Holy Qur’an series (Fons Vitae Publishers, USA with Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought, Amman, Jordan)(2005-2010), Section Editor (Islam) of Wiley-Blackwell’s Religion Compass (2005-2010) and Book Review Editor (Medieval Islamic and Jewish Studies), Speculum, published by the Medieval Academy of America (2007-2012) and Founding Editor of Intertwined Worlds (2010-2013), an e-platform dedicated to the academic study of Muslim-Jewish and Muslim-Jewish-Christian Relations.

MemberHussein Rashid

… “Ghazali,” “Attar,” “Ibn Arabi,” “Rumi,” in Mysticism and the Spiritual Quest, edited by Phyllis Zagano. New York; Paulist Press.
2010. “Middle East,” in Religion and Violence: An Encyclopedia of Faith and Conflict from Antiquity to the Present, edited by Jeffrey Ian Ross. Armonk, NY: ME Sharpe.
2007. “Calendar,” “Calligraphy,” “Central Asians,” “Film,” “Five Percenters,” “Hip-Hop,” “Islam in America Journal,” “Qawwali,” “South Asians,” In Encyclopedia of Islam in the United States, edited by Jocelyne Cesari. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press.
Reports
2015. with Chris D. Cantwell. Religion, Media, and the Digital Turn. New York: Social Science Research Council.
Essays
2019. “Letter 4,” and “Authors’ Postscript,” in American Values Religious Voices, edited by Andrea L. Weiss and Lisa M. Weinberger. Cincinnati: University of Cincinnati Press, 30; 152-157.
2014. “Passing on Tradition in Islam,” In Sharing the Well: A Resource Guide for Jewish-Muslim En…

Hussein Rashid, PhD, is founder of islamicate, L3C, a consultancy focusing on religious literacy and cultural competency. He works with a variety of NGOs, foundations, non-profits, and governmental agencies for content expertise on religion broadly, with a specialization on Islam. His work includes exploring theology, the interaction between culture and religion, and the role of the arts in conflict mediation. Hussein has a BA in Middle Eastern Studies from Columbia University, a Masters in Theological Studies focusing on Islam, and an MA and PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, focusing on South and Central Asia from Harvard University. He is a contingent faculty member and has taught at Hofstra University, Fordham University, Iona College, Virginia Theological Seminary, Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, SUNY Old Westbury, Barnard College, Columbia University, and The New School. His research focuses on Muslims and American popular culture. He writes and speaks about music, comics, movies, and the blogistan. He also has a background in South and Central Asian studies, with a deep interest in Shi’i justice theology. He has published academic works on Muslims and American Popular Culture, Malcolm X, qawwali, intra-Muslim racism, teaching Shi’ism, Islam and comics, free speech, Sikhs and Islamophobia, Muslims in film, and American Muslim spaces of worship. His current project focuses on the role of technology in teaching religion. He is a fellow with The Ariane de Rothschild Fellowship in Social Entrepreneurship, the American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute, and the Truman National Security Project. He was a fellow at the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, and a term member on the Council of Foreign Relations. He is on the advisory boards of The Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art (Building Bridges Program), Sacred Matters, Anikaya Dance Theater, the Tanenbaum Center, and Al-Rawiya. He served on the advisory board of Project Interfaith, Everplans, Intersections International, Deily, and the British Council’s Our Shared Future Program. He is currently working with the Children’s Museum of Manhattan as a content expert. He was on the editorial boards of Religion Dispatches, The Islamic Monthly, and Cyber Orient, in addition to being an emeritus scholar at State of Formation. Hussein appears on mainstream media, including CNN, Channel 4 (UK),  Al-Jazeera America, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and has published at On Faith (Washington Post), Belief Blog (CNN), On Being (NPR), The Revealer, and as a contributor to Religion News Service.

MemberMegan Goodwin

I work on race, gender, sexuality, politics, and American minority religions. My current project, Women and Children Last: Sex, Abuse, and American Minority Religions, looks at how Americans code religious difference as sexual danger.  The next one’s on the ways contemporary American whiteness is (or feels) threatened by Muslims and Islam. I’m also an expert in creative and innovative pedagogy and a syllabus design nerd.

MemberSteven Vose

Dr. Vose’s main areas for research and teaching are the religious traditions of South Asia, primarily in Jainism and secondarily in Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Islam. He examines the history of interactions within and between these traditions to understand the meaning and contexts of community identity formation, religious authority, and the relationships between religious communities and the state in the medieval and early modern periods. Dr. Vose is interested in devotional practices as public religious expressions, especially pilgrimage and temple ritual; and the place of “tantra” and alchemy in medieval Indian society. Dr. Vose also works on the development of vernacular literary traditions, especially in Old Gujarati, and the interaction of Sanskrit, Prakrit and vernacular languages and literatures. Finally, his work examines architecture, sculpture and manuscript painting practices, especially in western India. More broadly, he is interested in historiography in the study of religion, literary theory and religious reading practices, modern and premodern religious identity politics, religious and ethno-nationalism, conflict and non-violence in South Asia. His early training was primarily anthropological, and he brings a focus on the lived reality of religious life to his study of the medieval and early modern Indian past.

MemberNeema GHENIM

Ghenim Neema is a professor of English Literature at the University Mohamed Ben Ahmed, Oran 2, Algeria. She earned a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature on Sufism in Algeria as well as Transcendentalism in the United States. Her field of interest is comparative literature with a focus on postcolonial Africa and the question of democracy as well as the challenge between remembering and forgetfulness. She is also interested in literary theories dealing with questions of gender and identity in literary discourse. As a teacher, she tries to make connections between literature and history. She engages and inspires her students to cultivate their curiosity.

MemberSierra Rooney

I am an assistant professor of art history at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, specializing in American visual culture and public art. My research interests include representations of gender and race, commemoration, civic-engagement, and place-based identity within the United States. My current book project, Breaking the Bronze Ceiling: Contemporary Statue Monuments to Women and the Changing Heroic Ideal in the United States, analyzes more than fifty monuments to the five most-commemorated women in the United States (Sacagawea, Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart and Rosa Parks) to uncover the many ways in which artists and patrons adapt the traditional model of the hero statue to integrate feminist and race-conscious modes of thought into local communities.   

MemberKaty Ryan

I teach twentieth-century American literature, performance, and prison studies. In 2004, I founded the Appalachian Prison Book Project, a community and student organization that sends free books to women and men imprisoned in six states. Recently I edited a collection of creative and critical writings on the death penalty, _Demands of the Dead: Executions, Storytelling, and Activism in the United States_ (Univ of Iowa 2012).