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MemberDavid Hope

I am an economic historian specialising in the history of British overseas trade circa 1700 to 1850. I am particularly interested in the connections between commerce, colonialism, and consumption through the study of chartered trading companies, commodities, merchants, and distribution. As Economic History Society Anniversary Fellow — a one-year postdoctoral position co-sponsored by the Economic History Society, Newcastle University, and the Institute of Historical Research (School of Advanced Study, University of London) — I am writing my first monograph on the subject of the late-eighteenth and early nineteenth-century British Atlantic fur trade: a publication that advances my doctoral thesis beyond the records of the Hudson’s Bay Company by using new research into Scottish-Canadian merchant papers undertaken in Montreal, Ottawa, and Winnipeg over the summer of 2018. By locating the British fur trade within the wider ‘Atlantic World’, the book explores what this trade suggests about the institution of empire, the emergence of an integrated Atlantic economy, and the circulation of commodities in an era of protoglobalisation and burgeoning consumerism. I joined Newcastle University in October 2016 as a Teacher in History after completing my doctorate at Northumbria University. I have taught widely on the history of Britain, Europe, the Americas, and world empires at Newcastle, Northumbria, and Teesside Universities.

MemberVictoria Phillips

Victoria Phillips is the author of Martha Graham’s Cold War: The Dance of American Diplomacy, which explores the international political life of Martha Graham to promote the United States on in over thirty nations for every presidential administration from Franklin D. Roosevelt through George H.W. Bush. She has begun her next work, a political biography of Eleanor Lansing Dulles in divided Cold War Europe, 1945-1961. Through Columbia University’s Cultural Initiative at the European Institute, Victoria runs the Cold War Archival Research Project (CWAR) and takes advanced students from Columbia, the London School of Economics, and West Point Military Academy to archives in the US and Europe to conduct primary research on Cold War power, and the intersection of soft and hard. She was a Lecturer in History at the European Institute and Department of History, Associated Faculty at the Harriman Institute, visiting professor at the Institute of International Relations at Corvinus University of Budapest and a Distinguished Fellow at its Institute for Advanced Studies, and will continue in 2020 as a Visiting Fellow in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics.    Her articles have appeared in such varied publications as the New York TimesAmerican Communist History, Grant’s Interest Rate Observer, Dance ChronicleBallet News, and Dance Research Journal. She has curated several public exhibitions in the United States and Europe, and has lectured at renowned universities, colleges, high schools, arts academies, and international institutes. At present she serves on the boards of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the European Institute at Columbia University, The British Academy of Dance Scholars, and the Historic Dance Theatre. She is on the editorial boards of American Communist History and Dance Chronicle. Her primary research is held at the Library of Congress as the Victoria Phillips Collection. She is the Chair of the SHAFR Task Force on Remote Research in response to the current COVID crisis.  

MemberChristopher Ohge

I am Lecturer in Digital Approaches to Literature at the Institute of English Studies and Digital Humanities Research Hub at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. I work at the intersection between English literature and computation (computation as a way of thinking and analysing, in addition to creating formal systems through logical and quantitative means, I should clarify). My academic specialties are textual scholarship and bibliography; nineteenth and twentieth century literature, with a particular focus on romanticism, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, antislavery archives and print culture, and modernist authors; digital publishing (XML technologies and other markup languages); data science and corpus analysis approaches to literature, particularly with the R programming language. I also like to experiment with new methods which I am still learning, such as machine learning, network analysis, graph databases and technologies, spatial networks, and digital curation.   In addition to my current role, I serve as Associate Director of the Herman Melville Electronic Library and as a core faculty member for the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents, sponsored by the US National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). Before coming to London I was an editor at the Mark Twain Project at the University of California, Berkeley, and a postdoctoral fellow in digital humanities at the University of Maine.

MemberJane Winters

In my role as Professor of Digital Humanities & Pro-Dean for Libraries and Digital, I’m responsible for developing DH at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. I’ve led or co-directed a range of digital projects, including most recently Big UK Domain Data for the Arts and Humanities; Digging into Linked Parliamentary Metadata; Traces through Time: Prosopography in Practice across Big Data; the Thesaurus of British and Irish History as SKOS; and Born Digital Big Data and Approaches for History and the Humanities. I’m a Fellow and Councillor of the Royal Historical Society, and a member of RESAW (Research Infrastructure for the Study of the Archived Web), the Academic Steering & Advocacy Committee of the Open Library of Humanities, the Advisory Board of the Digital Preservation Coalition, the Advisory Board of the European Holocaust Research Infrastructure, the Advisory Board of Cambridge Digital Humanities, and the UK UNESCO Memory of the World Committee.

MemberNicholas S.M. Matheou

…Institute of Historical Research, School of Advanced Study, University of London…

I am a social historian specialising in the Middle East and Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, particularly Anatolia, Upper Mesopotamia and Caucasia (approximately modern-day Turkey, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan, as well as parts of northern Syria and Iraq). In particular my research focuses on the empire of New Rome (“Byzantium”), Armenian and Georgian polities in the central Middle Ages, and the city of Ani, between the ninth to and fourteenth centuries. I also takes a comparative perspective across the region, especially from Kurdish and Ottoman studies, as well as globally, from pre-history to the modern day. Through this research I theorise social-historical themes of hegemony and counterpower, ethnicity and nationhood, and critical political economy before, during and after the rise of capitalism. I aim towards a radical perspective on social history from an anarchist – that is, a methodologically anti-state – standpoint. I received my first degree in Ancient & Medieval History from the University of Edinburgh, before moving to the University of Oxford to complete first a master’s degree in Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, and then a doctoral dissertation in the Faculty of Oriental Studies titled ‘Situating the History attributed to Aristakes Lastiverc‘i: The Empire of New Rome & Caucasia in the Eleventh Century’. During my time as a postgraduate student I co-founded the international research network The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood at The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH), running a number of workshops, conferences and seminar series. At the IHR I will focus on developing my doctoral research into a monograph, and begin a new project titled ‘“The Fate of Unjust Cities”: Global History, Political Economy & the Abandoned City of Ani, 900-1400’. This radical global history and political economy of the abandoned city of Ani in central South Caucasia, modern-day eastern Turkey, will situate the city’s emergence, development and decline between the tenth and fourteenth centuries in macro regional and interregional transformations, particularly the Mediterranean Commercial Revolution and the emergent world-system generated by Mongol Eurasian hegemony, in connected micro analysis of developing social relations in the urban space. The project draws on Ani’s rich material remains, particularly the large corpus of monumental epigraphy, as well as numismatics, ceramics and architectural remains, supplemented by Armenian, Georgian, Greek and Islamic (Arabic & Persian) literary sources. Exploring and theorising the political economy of different state-systems, long durée histories of commercial capitalism, and subaltern resistance framed through the heuristics of hegemony and counterpower, the project touches on historical and social themes relevant across time and place.   Normal 0 false false false EN-GB KO X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

MemberPaula Sofia Hohti

I am a historian of material culture, fashion, and everyday life, and an assistant professor of the History of Art and Culture at Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Helsinki. Since I gained by my PhD at the University of Sussex in 2006, supervised by Evelyn Welch, I have held positions at Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, the European University in Florence, Bard Graduate Centre in New York and Center for Textile Research in Copenhagen. I have been a principal investigator in two international projects, The Material Renaissance: Costs and Consumption in Italy 1350-1600 and Fashioning the Early Modern: Creativity and Innovation in Europe, 1500-1800. In 2016, I received a 2m euro ERC grant to study early modern popular fashions and historical and digital reconstruction as a methodology for dress historians.

MemberMichael David-Fox

Michael David-Fox is a historian of modern Russia and the USSR, whose work has ranged from cultural and political history to transnational studies and modernity theory. At the outset of his career, he became one of the first foreign researchers to work in formerly closed Communist Party archives during the collapse of the Soviet Union. He went on to become a founding editor of Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History [https://kritika.georgetown.edu/], now based at Georgetown, a transformative journal that has helped to internationalize the field of Russian Studies. For this, he received the 2010 Distinguished Editor Award from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. In a series of books, nine edited volumes, twelve edited special theme issues of journals, and over forty-five articles and chapters, David-Fox has probed unexpected connections between culture and politics, institutions and mentalities, and domestic and international shifts. His latest work explores covert entanglements across borders, ideologies, and cultures. He has strong interests in transnational and comparative history and in the history of Russian-German relations, broadly conceived, as well as in the history of the Russian Revolution and Stalinism. David-Fox received his A.B. from Princeton and his PhD from Yale. He is author of Revolution of the Mind: Higher Learning among the Bolsheviks, 1918-1929 (1997); Showcasing the Great Experiment: Cultural Diplomacy and Western Visitors to the Soviet Union, 1921-1941 (2012, translated into Russian and Chinese, a Choice Outstanding Academic Title); Crossing Borders: Modernity, Ideology, and Culture in Russia and the Soviet Union (2015, under translation into Russian, winner of the 2016 Historia Nova Prize for Best Book in Russian Intellectual and Cultural History). David-Fox has been a Humboldt Fellow (Germany), a visiting professor at the Centre russe, EHESS (France), and was awarded the title of honorary professor from Samara State University (Russia). He has been a visiting scholar or fellow at the W. Averill Harriman Institute at Columbia University, the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies, the Mershon Center for Studies in International Security and Public Policy, the National Academy of Education, the Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University, the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (2017). His current book project, “Smolensk under Nazi and Soviet Rule,” is a study of the exercise of power in a Russian region under Stalinism and the German occupation during WWII. Aiming squarely at the place where regional history meets the grand narrative, it cross-fertilizes three rapidly evolving fields: the study of Stalinism, German occupation on the Eastern Front during World War II, and the Holocaust. Since 2013, David-Fox has served as scholarly advisor to the International Centre for the History and Sociology of World War II and its Consequences at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow.

MemberPaul Michael Kurtz

I am a modern cultural, intellectual, and religious historian. My research centers on the production and circulation of knowledge about the ancient world both in and between Europe and the Middle East during the 19th and 20th centuries. In my early work, I concentrated on the technical scholarly practices as well as the nationalist, political, and theological forces that shaped representations of early Judaism in the German Empire, esp in biblical, classical, and oriental studies. My latest work examines philology as the premier science of the nineteenth century, focusing on the networks, media, infrastructure, and instruments involved in collecting, processing, and reproducing texts. This research expands traditional work on the history of the humanities by combining an understanding of global and colonial history, media theory, history of science, and science and technology studies.   My work appears in the finest journals of history, religion, and culture, such as History & TheoryCritical Inquiry, Central European History, and Harvard Theological Review. My first monograph, on the historiography of ancient Israel in the German Empire, was published by Mohr Siebeck in 2018.   Since 2019, I have been a Research Fellow of the Flemish Research Council (FWO) at Ghent University. Before coming to Ghent, I was a Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Cambridge and Queens’ College (2017–19) and, prior, a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Göttingen (2016–17). In 2016, I obtained my PhD, with highest distinction, from Göttingen, where I was also a Fulbright Scholar. During doctoral studies, I held research fellowships at the University of Chicago, Leibniz Institute of European History (Mainz), Max Weber Centre for Advanced Studies (Erfurt), and Ghent. This followed an MDiv at Princeton Theological Seminary.   In addition to the FWO, I have secured funding from the European Commission (Horizon2020), Fulbright Program, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), and American Schools of Oriental Research.