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MemberJohn Bell

John P. Bell is a software developer and artist at Dartmouth College. His work there includes acting as Director of the Data Experiences and Visualizations Studio, Associate Director of the Media Ecology Project, Manager of Dartmouth Research Computing‘s Digital Humanities Program, and teaching as a Lecturer in Film and Media Studies. His research focuses on collaborative creativity and has produced everything from utilitarian semantic web publishing platforms to aggressively useless installation art. With nine others, he was the co-author an 85,000-word long book about a 38-character long computer program. In addition to his work at Dartmouth, he is also an Assistant Professor of Digital Curation at the University of Maine and Senior Researcher at the Still Water Lab. He holds one of what is believed to be the first three collaborative doctoral degrees ever conferred in the United States, the other two of which are held by the co-authors of their collective dissertation on collaboration in the arts.

MemberAlenda Chang

Alenda Y. Chang is an Associate Professor in Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. With a multidisciplinary background in biology, literature, and film, she specializes in merging ecocritical theory with the analysis of contemporary media. Her writing has been featured in Ant Spider BeeInterdisciplinary Studies in Literature and EnvironmentQui Parle, the Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, and Ecozon@, and her first book Playing Nature: Ecology in Video Games (forthcoming University of Minnesota Press), develops ecological frameworks for understanding and designing digital games. Along with Film and Media Studies professor Laila Shereen Sakr, Chang is also the co-founder of the digital media studio Wireframe (Music 1410). Wireframe was established to support collaborative and cutting-edge research and teaching in new media, with an emphasis on global human rights, social justice, and environmental concerns. Located adjacent to the Digital Arts and Humanities Commons, the studio provides a space for production and critical engagement across media including games, data visualization, installation art, virtual/augmented reality, projection mapping, performance and installation, livestreaming, 3D modeling, mobile apps, and social media.

MemberGarrett Lynch (IRL)

Garrett Lynch (IRL) is an artist, lecturer, curator and theorist. His work deals with networks (in their most open sense) within an artistic context; the spaces between artist, artworks and audience as a means, site and context for artistic initiation, creation and discourse. Recently most active in live performance Garrett’s networked practice spans online art, installation, performance and writing. Currently Garrett’s research and practice focus is exploring the thesis that networks are a transformative factor in contemporary art practice. How both cultural and technological developments in the latter half of the 20th century e.g. the dematerialisation (Lippard, 1997) of art as object, art as process (Alloway, 1972) and the adoption of a systems approach to a number of fields, have enabled practice to become above all concerned with relationship and behaviour. Art has always suggested connections to the world it is embedded within. Contemporary art continues to do this at a now hyper accelerated pace within a globalised cultural and social context (Castells, 2000) however it can also facilitate actual connections through (new) media as discussed in new media theory. Relationships are produced as a result of connections which enable performative scenarios. As a result of its key concerns this practice should be considered a networked practice and not because of the media forms which may or may not be its technical enabler or carrier. Post-graduate of interactive research at the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs (EnsAD), Paris, France and PhD of networked art at South Bank University, London, England Garrett has taught on several new media courses throughout England and Wales.

MemberMiriam Schaer

Miriam Schaer is a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist who uses artist books, garments, photography, installation and college to explore feminine, social and spiritual issues. She is represented in numerous collections, including the Alan Chasanoff Book Arts Collection at the Yale Museum, the Arts of the Book Collection at Yale’s Sterling Library, the Mata & Arthur Jaffe Collection: Book as Aesthetic Object at Florida Atlantic University, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Harvard University, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture at Duke University. Miriam Schaer is an interdisciplinary artist who’s work includes artist books, photography, installation as well textiles, felt and embroidery, in relationship to artist books. Her projects, Crafting Women’s Stories: Lives in Georgian Felt and Craft Power: Enhancing Women’s Rights Through Traditional Practices in the Republic of Georgia, with colleagues Clifton Meador and Melissa Potter, earned Soros Foundation funding were realized in the Republic of Georgia in 2013. Her work has earned a NYFA Artists Fellowship, inclusion in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for the Feminist Art Base at the Brooklyn Museum, representation at the Cheongju International Craft Biennale in South Korea and was an artist in residence for the Imagining the Book Biennale at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Alexandria, Egypt. She was a Fulbright Fellow in the Republic of Georgia in March 2017. Her series, Baby (Not) On Board: The Last Prejudice?, about societal prejudice against women without children, was included in MAMA-Motherhood Around the Globe at the International Museum of Women, and featured on Babble.com and the Huffington Post. Schaer’s artist book,The Presence of Their Absence, incorporates her photographs, research and writing on the topic of childlessness. Her interactive project What’s Your Baby?  re-frames the question of why some people don’t have children to honor and respect everyone’s choices. Miriam Schaer is a an independent artist and educator. Formerly a Senior Lecturer in the Art+Art History Department at Columbia College Chicago, she also taught Art of the Book at the Pratt Institute, and served as a visiting artist at numerous institutions, including Sarah Lawrence College, Marshall University, and Colorado College. She is represented by the Central Booking Art Space and Vamp and Tramp Booksellers

MemberNancy Um

Nancy Um is professor of art history at Binghamton University. She received her MA and PhD in art history from UCLA. Her research explores the Islamic world from the perspective of the coast, with a focus on material, visual, and built culture on the Arabian Peninsula and around the rims of the Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Her first book The Merchant Houses of Mocha: Trade and Architecture in an Indian Ocean Port (University of Washington Press, 2009) relies upon a cross-section of visual, architectural, and textual sources to present the early modern coastal city of Mocha as a space that was nested within wider world networks, structured to communicate with far-flung ports and cities across a vast matrix of exchange. Her second book, Shipped but not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Order of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017), explores the material practices and informal social protocols that undergirded the overseas trade in 18th C Yemen. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, African Arts, Northeast African Studies, Journal of Early Modern History, Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture, Art History, and Getty Research Journal. She has received research fellowships from the Fulbright program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Getty Foundation, and the American Institute for Yemeni Studies.

MemberClara Salina

Born in Italy in 1961, Clara Salina is an Italian photographer and contemporary visual artist, resident in Chile since 2006. She hold a Maximum Honor bachelor in Visual Arts and a Diploma in Film Script. As a scenic photographer, she has had the opportunity to photograph staging or concerts in theaters and extremely different places on the planet. In Chile, it is due to highlights her collaboration with the Nescafé de las Artes Theater (2009/10) and the WOMAD festival (2014/18) In September 2009, he made her first personal RE-VISIONS exhibition in the Oriente Theater Hall of Providencia. Later, the two books of the Nescafé de las Arte Theater include many of her photos. After collaborating with the “Nescafé”, since 2012 she opts for a freelance career and goes into photographic, sociological, historical and environmental research projects. In July 2017, at the “Italian Institute of Culture” in Providencia (Santiago, Chile) she exhibited “Due ma non Due” (Two but not Two): two installations focused on science, philosophy and environment. In November of 2017 the same, she launched the photographic book “Cielos of Santiago” that include the first 50 photos of an artistic, visual and semiotic research she begun in 2013, about the architectonical inner ceilings as a memory repository. From April to August 2018, two of the photographs of the series “Cielos”, titled “Salón Rojo” and “Camarín”, were exhibited in the La Moneda Cultural Center (Santiago-Chile) in a collective exhibition with the title “Cambio de lugar” (Change of location – curatorship of Mariagrazia Muscatello and Montserrat Rojas) Those two photos have been later included within the MAC Museum Collection (Chile) and been exhibited at the Quinta Normal MAC seat between December 2018 and January 2019. Her last exhibition “El poder de los Cielos” (10 photos and one installation) with the curatorship of Mariagrazia Muscatello has been exhibited from July 17 to September 9, 2019 at the Italian Institute of Culture in Santiago and from October 12 to 12 December 2019 at the MAM Museum in Chiloé.   The “Cielos” research is constantly under development and a second stage is adding on Valparaíso and Viña del Mar.

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberAgata Lulkowska

Interdisciplinary researcher, photographer and filmmaker. Agata Lulkowska holds a practice-based PhD in film and Latin American studies from Birkbeck, University of London. Her research focuses on the politics of visual representation among the Arhuaco community from Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia. She used collaborative filmmaking as a method. Lulkowska also holds Master’s Degree in Film and Media Studies at Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland, unfinished MA in Film Direction at Silesian University, Katowice, Poland, and a First Class Honours degree in Digital Media Arts at London South Bank University. Alongside her research work, she actively exhibits her visual work in wide international circles such as Tokyo, Paris, Amsterdam, Barcelona, London, Bologna. Lulkowska’s research addresses questions of representation, otherness, and intercultural communication. She is particularly interested in the way film and video circulate in international circles, and how the aspect of communication transcends the cultural barriers. She lived and worked on three different continents, and she is trilingual.