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MemberGarrett Lynch (IRL)

Garrett Lynch (IRL) is an artist, lecturer, curator and theorist. His work deals with networks (in their most open sense) within an artistic context; the spaces between artist, artworks and audience as a means, site and context for artistic initiation, creation and discourse. Recently most active in live performance Garrett’s networked practice spans online art, installation, performance and writing. Currently Garrett’s research and practice focus is exploring the thesis that networks are a transformative factor in contemporary art practice. How both cultural and technological developments in the latter half of the 20th century e.g. the dematerialisation (Lippard, 1997) of art as object, art as process (Alloway, 1972) and the adoption of a systems approach to a number of fields, have enabled practice to become above all concerned with relationship and behaviour. Art has always suggested connections to the world it is embedded within. Contemporary art continues to do this at a now hyper accelerated pace within a globalised cultural and social context (Castells, 2000) however it can also facilitate actual connections through (new) media as discussed in new media theory. Relationships are produced as a result of connections which enable performative scenarios. As a result of its key concerns this practice should be considered a networked practice and not because of the media forms which may or may not be its technical enabler or carrier. Post-graduate of interactive research at the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs (EnsAD), Paris, France and PhD of networked art at South Bank University, London, England Garrett has taught on several new media courses throughout England and Wales.

MemberMiriam Schaer

Miriam Schaer is a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist who uses artist books, garments, photography, installation and college to explore feminine, social and spiritual issues. She is represented in numerous collections, including the Alan Chasanoff Book Arts Collection at the Yale Museum, the Arts of the Book Collection at Yale’s Sterling Library, the Mata & Arthur Jaffe Collection: Book as Aesthetic Object at Florida Atlantic University, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Harvard University, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture at Duke University. Miriam Schaer is an interdisciplinary artist who’s work includes artist books, photography, installation as well textiles, felt and embroidery, in relationship to artist books. Her projects, Crafting Women’s Stories: Lives in Georgian Felt and Craft Power: Enhancing Women’s Rights Through Traditional Practices in the Republic of Georgia, with colleagues Clifton Meador and Melissa Potter, earned Soros Foundation funding were realized in the Republic of Georgia in 2013. Her work has earned a NYFA Artists Fellowship, inclusion in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for the Feminist Art Base at the Brooklyn Museum, representation at the Cheongju International Craft Biennale in South Korea and was an artist in residence for the Imagining the Book Biennale at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Alexandria, Egypt. She was a Fulbright Fellow in the Republic of Georgia in March 2017. Her series, Baby (Not) On Board: The Last Prejudice?, about societal prejudice against women without children, was included in MAMA-Motherhood Around the Globe at the International Museum of Women, and featured on Babble.com and the Huffington Post. Schaer’s artist book,The Presence of Their Absence, incorporates her photographs, research and writing on the topic of childlessness. Her interactive project What’s Your Baby?  re-frames the question of why some people don’t have children to honor and respect everyone’s choices. Miriam Schaer is a an independent artist and educator. Formerly a Senior Lecturer in the Art+Art History Department at Columbia College Chicago, she also taught Art of the Book at the Pratt Institute, and served as a visiting artist at numerous institutions, including Sarah Lawrence College, Marshall University, and Colorado College. She is represented by the Central Booking Art Space and Vamp and Tramp Booksellers

MemberNancy Um

Nancy Um is professor of art history at Binghamton University. She received her MA and PhD in art history from UCLA. Her research explores the Islamic world from the perspective of the coast, with a focus on material, visual, and built culture on the Arabian Peninsula and around the rims of the Red Sea and Indian Ocean. Her first book The Merchant Houses of Mocha: Trade and Architecture in an Indian Ocean Port (University of Washington Press, 2009) relies upon a cross-section of visual, architectural, and textual sources to present the early modern coastal city of Mocha as a space that was nested within wider world networks, structured to communicate with far-flung ports and cities across a vast matrix of exchange. Her second book, Shipped but not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Order of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017), explores the material practices and informal social protocols that undergirded the overseas trade in 18th C Yemen. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, African Arts, Northeast African Studies, Journal of Early Modern History, Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture, Art History, and Getty Research Journal. She has received research fellowships from the Fulbright program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Getty Foundation, and the American Institute for Yemeni Studies.

MemberAgata Lulkowska

Interdisciplinary researcher, photographer and filmmaker. Agata Lulkowska holds a practice-based PhD in film and Latin American studies from Birkbeck, University of London. Her research focuses on the politics of visual representation among the Arhuaco community from Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia. She used collaborative filmmaking as a method. Lulkowska also holds Master’s Degree in Film and Media Studies at Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland, unfinished MA in Film Direction at Silesian University, Katowice, Poland, and a First Class Honours degree in Digital Media Arts at London South Bank University. Alongside her research work, she actively exhibits her visual work in wide international circles such as Tokyo, Paris, Amsterdam, Barcelona, London, Bologna. Lulkowska’s research addresses questions of representation, otherness, and intercultural communication. She is particularly interested in the way film and video circulate in international circles, and how the aspect of communication transcends the cultural barriers. She lived and worked on three different continents, and she is trilingual.

MemberTiffany Ng

Tiffany Ng is assistant professor of Carillon and University carillonist at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. An energetic advocate of diversity in contemporary music, she has premiered or revived over forty works by emerging and established composers from Yvette Janine Jackson to Augusta Read Thomas, pioneered models for interactive “crowdsourced” carillon performances and environmental data-driven sound installations with Greg Niemeyer, Chris Chafe, Ed Campion, Ken Goldberg, John Granzow, and Laura Steenberge, and through her composer collaborations significantly increased the American repertoire for carillon and electronics. Her concert career has taken her to festivals in fifteen countries in Europe, Asia, and North America, including the 2018 University of Chicago Rockefeller Carillon New Music Festival, 2018 Canberra Carillon Festival, 2017 University of Michigan Bicentennial, UC Berkeley 2015 Campanile Centennial, Stanford 2014 CCRMA anniversary festival, 23rd International Carillon Festival at Bok Tower Gardens-Florida, 2014 International Carillon Festival Barcelona, and 2008 Post-Congress Festival of the World Carillon Federation. Dr. Ng’s previous positions include visiting professor of Music History at St. Olaf College, associate carillonist at the University of California, Berkeley, and instructor of Carillon at the University of Rochester. Her musicology dissertation, “The Heritage of the Future: Historical Keyboards, Technology, and Modernism,” explores the carillon and organ in terms of music technology, the Early Music movement, and the Cold War in America and the Netherlands, drawing on media studies, urban planning, legal history, and the history of military electronics to reevaluate the Organ Reform Movement and the postwar use of carillons as diplomatic and urban planning technologies. Ng holds a licentiate diploma magna cum laude from the Royal Carillon School “Jef Denyn” where she studied with Geert D’hollander, a PhD from UC Berkeley where she studied with Richard Taruskin (musicology and new media), a master’s degree from the Eastman School of Music where she studied with William Porter (organ), and a bachelor’s degree from Yale University (English and music). She is a former special exhibit curator at the Yale University Collection of Musical Instruments, former assistant director of the Women in Music Festival and the Contemporary Organ Music Festival in Rochester, New York, author of the multimedia catalog of the Municipal Carillon Museum of Mechelen, Belgium, and currently serves on advisory boards for the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments, Yale University Guild of Carillonneurs, and Organ Historical Society. Ng’s awards include the Shirley Verrett Award for the support of women of color in the arts, the Ronald Barnes Memorial Scholarship for Carillon Studies, the E. Power Biggs Fellowship of the Organ Historical Society, the Consortium for Faculty Diversity Fellowship, the UC Berkeley Arts Research Center Fellowship, the Westfield Center for Early Keyboard Studies paper award, and the Belgian American Educational Foundation Fellowship.

MemberJoanna Gardner-Huggett

Joanna Gardner-Huggett is an Associate Professor and Chair of History of Art and Architecture where she teaches courses on twentieth-century art and feminist theory. Gardner-Huggett’s research focuses on the intersection between feminism and arts activism and has been published in the journals British Art Journal, Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies, Historical Geography, and Woman’s Art Journal. Her most recent scholarship explores the history of the painter Julia Thecla (1896-1973), the Guerrilla Girls, the Feminist Art Workers, and the origins of the women artists’ cooperatives Artemisia Gallery in Chicago (1973-2003) and ARC (1973-present). 

MemberMartin Alejandro Biaggini

He is a Senior Technician in Film Direction (ESC), Professor in History (ISSJ), Bachelor in the Teaching of Combined Arts (UNLA), Specialist in Education, Languages ​​and Media (UNSaM) and Master in Education and Media (UNSaM). It is part of the audiovisual collective TV Matanza Cultural Coop. Ltda. and Matanza Arde, in which he performs as a filmmaker. As a teacher, in addition to numerous courses and seminars in state and private entities, he served as a professor at the National University of La Matanza, the University of Belgrano and is currently a professor at the National Arturo Jauretche University and the National University of Lanús. He coordinates the Aesthetics Area in the Culture Studies Program (UNAJ), is the coordinator of the International Art, Culture and Politics Conference (UNAJ), which is held annually since 2015 and forms part of the editorial committee of the E-verba journal (UNAJ-BCC).