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MemberMatthew Scarborough

I was awarded my Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (UK) in March 2017 for a dissertation on the linguistic prehistory and historical dialectology of the Aeolic dialects of Ancient Greek. Since October 2015 I have been also collaborating as a research associate with the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (Jena, Germany) on a new database of Indo-European cognate relations. Since Fall 2019 I have also been a sessional lecturer in Classics at MacEwan University (Edmonton, Canada). My research interests can be subdivided into a handful of related topics:

  • Greek language and linguistics (from Mycenaean to the modern spoken language)
  • Ancient Greek dialect studies (from both literary and sub-literary sources)
  • Ancient Greek epigraphy and papyrology
  • Indo-European comparative linguistics and philology (including comparative myth and poetics)
  • Homer and other Early Greek poetry
  • Etymology and the Indo-European lexicon
  • Language classification, cladistics, and subgrouping methodologies in historical linguistics

MemberJames Tauber

I work at the intersection of computing, philology, and linguistics both as an independent scholar and as a software developer working on digital humanities projects with other scholars. My interests include morphology (theoretical, computational, and historical), Indo-European linguistics, Linguistic Linked Open Data, text encoding and annotation of historical language corpora (especially Ancient Greek but also Old English and Old Norse), machine-actionable language description, computer-aided historical language learning (especially Ancient Greek but also Old English and Old Norse).

MemberKeith Tse

Theoretical linguistics, theoretical syntax, historical syntax, historical and comparative linguistics, Chinese linguistics, East Asian linguistics, Latin/Romance linguistics, Indo-European linguistics, grammaticalization, linguistic interfaces

MemberNelson Goering

I’m a linguist and philologist specialized in the earlier history of the Germanic languages, including Old and Middle English, Old Norse, Gothic, Old Frisian, Old Saxon, and Old High German. I currently hold a British Academy postdoctoral fellowship to research Norse Influence on Middle English Prosody. Based on this work, I am preparing a book manuscript synthesizing the phonological and metrical evidence for foot structure in medieval English and Old Norse. I maintain a broad interest in what used to be called Germanic comparative philology, including the phonological and morphological development of the Germanic languages from Proto-Indo-European. This field combines close attention to ancient and medieval texts as the primary sources for information about older languages, and a grounding in the typology of languages around the world and current thinking about the possibilities and constraints concerning how languages and Language in general work. My ongoing blog series The History of the English Language in A Hundred Words aims to bring the full history of English, from its earliest reconstructible prehistory to the present day, to a wider public in a readable and reliable way.

MemberPeter-Alexander Kerkhof

I am a research fellow at Leiden University and Ghent University. My current research deals with the study of personal names and settlement names in Dutch and Belgian Brabant as a window on Brabantine medieval history. My expertise lies in on the crossroads between Germanic philology, Romance philology and medieval settlement history. Notable discoveries in my career have been

  • (2018) a Romance etymology for Dutch polder
  • (2018) a Celtic etymology for Dutch straf
  • (2014) reading the word auzandils on the Gothic Bologna fragment

From 2014-2016 and from 2018-20, I was a lecturer at Leiden University , teaching academic courses on Historical Linguistics, Old High German, Old Dutch, Old Saxon, Gothic, Paleolinguistics and Morphology. I have worked from 2016-2018 at the EVALISA project at Ghent University  where I focussed on the Proto-Indo-European origin of Old Germanic and Old Romance verbs that show non-canonical subject marking. In 2018, I received a PhD from Leiden University for my research on language contact between Merovingian Gallo-Romance and Merovingian Frankish. I have a keen interest in medieval vernacular languages and the historical experiences of the medieval commoner. By training, I am a linguist and a medievalist. In recent years, I have expanded my skills to include settlement history and agricultural history. I hope to improve my digital cartography skills in the future. I have written numerous popularizing articles about Dutch etymology, the history of the Dutch language and its links to the history of French. In the past years, I have also set up a national conference for Old Germanic Studies (Junius Symposium) together with my colleague Thijs Porck and I have given multiple newspaper and radio interviews on the prehistory of Dutch. I am also involved with several heritage projects highlighting the dimension of language when disclosing historical narratives.