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MemberNatasha Bailey

I am a cultural and gender historian, whose work focuses primarily on indigenous Nahua women in central Mexico during the early colonial period (early C16-mid C17). In my doctoral research I look at the participation of Nahua women in producing and selling the alcoholic beverage pulque and how their domination of the trade offered opportunities to negotiate their social position within a colonial state. My doctoral project brings together scholarship from gender history, indigenous history and drinking studies, pursuing an innovative methodology that combines source materials in Spanish, Nahuatl and visual languages.

MemberKyle Taylor Lucas

American Indian and Canada First Nations Studies Intersection of Colonial Oppression and Trauma Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Urban Indian Survival Indigenous and Post-Colonial Studies Indigenous Women and Generational Trauma Criminal Justice System Reform Dismantling the Prison Industrial Complex Political Economy and Justice History of Race, Class, and Gender in Colonial U.S. Women of Color and Feminist Theory Environmental Justice Wild Salmon Recovery Water as a Human Right

MemberEmily Smith

I specialize in research on 18th-century natural history collections and collectors, as well as the intersections between natural history and anthropology. I am especially interested in how recontextualizing historical narratives and reintegrating indigenous perspectives might yield a more wholistic understanding of human and “natural” landscapes.

MemberAshley Caranto Morford

Ashley Caranto Morford (she/her) is a Pilipina-British scholar-activist. She is currently completing SSHRC-funded doctoral studies in English Literature and Book History at the University of Toronto. Her research and pedagogy is in relationship with and accountable to Indigenous studies, Pilipinx studies, Indigenous-Pilipinx solidarity and coalition building, anti-colonial pedagogies and methods, and digital humanities.

MemberBernd Brabec de Mori

Bernd Brabec de Mori received his Ph.D in musicology from the University of Vienna. He specialised in indigenous music from the Ucayali valley in Eastern Peru, where he spent five years among the indigenous group Shipibo-Konibo. Since 2006, he has been working at the Phonogrammarchiv of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna; as a research and teaching assistant at the Centre for Systematic Musicology in Graz; as senior scientist at the Institute of Ethnomusicology, University of Music and Performing Arts, Graz; as guest professor at the Institute of Musicology of the University of Vienna, and as a lecturer at the department of social and cultural anthropology, Philipps-Universität Marburg. He is the author of “Die Lieder der Richtigen Menschen” (Songs of the Real People, 2015), editor of “The Human and Non-human in Lowland South American Indigenous Music” (2013), and co-editor of “Mundos audibles de América” (2015, with Matthias Lewy and Miguel A. García) and “Auditive Wissenskulturen” (2018, with Martin Winter). His publications contribute to the research areas of Western Amazonian indigenous music, arts, and history; to the complex of music, ritual, and altered states; as well as to theories about knowledge, ontology, and aurality/orality.

MemberSelena Couture

Selena Couture is a settler scholar and Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton/ Treaty 6 territory and Métis Region No.4. Her projects engage with theatrical and cultural performances including speech acts, place naming, Indigenous language revitalization and phenomenological spatial orientations. Through these elements she explores relationships to land: deconstructing conceptions of settler colonial whiteness and possession while foregrounding the maintenance of Indigenous places through performance. Publications include, Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park (McGill-Queen’s UP Indigenous and Northern Series, 2020) and On this Patch of Grass: City Parks and Occupied Lands (Fernwood 2018). She holds a SSHRC Insight Development Grant, “Decolonizing Performative Reenactments of History” which engages with the historical narratives created in rural BC, taking into account the lack of treaties to govern settler access to the land; the continuously present Indigenous protection of unceded territories despite settler colonial extraction; and the unique relation to the lands expressed through Indigenous languages. She is also a co-director of the Ecologies research cluster in the SSHRC Partnership Grant “Hemispheric Encounters: Developing Transborder Research-Creation Practices,” (2020-2027) led by Dr. Laura Levin of York University. The project is developing a network across the Americas of organizations, artists, activists and scholars actively working in and with hemispheric performance to share strategies and resources. Her research in this project focuses on human and environmental effects of transnational resource extraction, as well as site-based performance strategies of refusal that address urban, environmental, and spatial politics. Her research practice responds to the growing crisis of global warming, develops a wider collaborative network and expands efforts to create responsible relations with Indigenous people, lands and all other-than-human beings.