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MemberParkorn Wangpaiboonkit

Parkorn’s research considers realism in opera and music drama as a means of inventing racial difference across the colonial modern. His work diagnoses the practice of dramatizing and musicalizing another/an Other’s ethnicity as an imperial tool for race-making in the colonial liminal, historicizing the discourse on race and opera away from contemporary identity politics. His current project focuses on Western art practices in nineteenth-century Siam, and examines how the selective emulation and criticism of Italian opera at the Siamese court served as a discursive site for negotiating ethnological imperialism. Parkorn’s broader interests in opera studies include the performance of race and racialization, operatic masculinities and queer opera culture, new and old technologies of operatic sound reproduction, and colonial histories of Western opera. His article “Excavating operatic masculinity” is forthcoming with Cambridge Opera Journal.

MemberSteven Vose

Dr. Vose’s main areas for research and teaching are the religious traditions of South Asia, primarily in Jainism and secondarily in Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Islam. He examines the history of interactions within and between these traditions to understand the meaning and contexts of community identity formation, religious authority, and the relationships between religious communities and the state in the medieval and early modern periods. Dr. Vose is interested in devotional practices as public religious expressions, especially pilgrimage and temple ritual; and the place of “tantra” and alchemy in medieval Indian society. Dr. Vose also works on the development of vernacular literary traditions, especially in Old Gujarati, and the interaction of Sanskrit, Prakrit and vernacular languages and literatures. Finally, his work examines architecture, sculpture and manuscript painting practices, especially in western India. More broadly, he is interested in historiography in the study of religion, literary theory and religious reading practices, modern and premodern religious identity politics, religious and ethno-nationalism, conflict and non-violence in South Asia. His early training was primarily anthropological, and he brings a focus on the lived reality of religious life to his study of the medieval and early modern Indian past.

MemberDiana King

Diana King holds a PhD in French and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. She specializes in cultural, political, and intellectual exchanges between France and China, transnational literature, and modern Chinese history. Her current book project, “Translating Revolution in Twentieth-Century China and France,” examines how French and Chinese writers interpreted each other’s revolutions during key moments of political crisis and change, and contends that translation served as a key site of knowledge production, shaping the formulation of various political and cultural projects from constructing a Chinese national identity to articulating women’s rights to thinking about radical emancipation in an era of decolonization. An instructor of French at Columbia, she resides in Brooklyn, New York.  

MemberRevekka Kefalea

Apart from my studies in social and political sciences, I am also certified in cultural management and I have attended various seminars on the creative reuses of digital cultural heritage. By participating in a few research projects, I familiarised myself with using open accessed digital archives and repositories – and gradually, apart from their scientific and educational value, I discovered the creative possibilities offered by the rights to reuse, modify and remix their content. Since then, I take initiatives and actively participate in various events aiming at the engagement of the general public with the extension, enlargement and creative reuses of the digital commons.