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MemberJay Atkinson

Most of my professional life has been divided between Unitarian Universalist (UU) parish ministry and the academy, the latter including both adjunct seminary teaching and research in UU history and theology. My scholarship is focused primarily in the early modern period on the theology and ecclesiology of the Polish Brethren (later known outside Poland as “Socinians”), whose 100+ congregations (1560-1660) were the first anywhere in which anti-trinitarian (proto-unitarian) ideas were ecclesially embraced and catechized.

MemberAbigail Young

After finishing a Licentiate and PhD in mediaeval studies (specifically the history of mediaeval scritural exegesis), I found myself in non-traditional academic employment as a research associate at the Records of Early English Drama at the University of Toronto. There I honed my Latin and palaeographic skills, developed copy-editing skills, and learned to code C and HTML. But I found little time to give to the history of theology or exegesis, even to my chief interest, the Fourth Gospel. Now, in retirement, I am pursuing a long-desired goal of writing a commentary on that Gospel. It’s both a learning and a teaching experience.

MemberBeatrice Marovich

I am currently an Assistant Professor of Theology at Hanover College, in southern Indiana. My research is concerned with the intellectual history of Christianity, and the secular afterlives of theological concepts. I am interested in both the erasures and the endurances of the theological within secular frames of thought. And I am especially interested in how these traces of the theological have influenced the way we think about the natural world, other creatures, our mortal bodies (and their eventual destinies). My current book project, Creature Feeling: Power and Affect in Creaturely Life examines the figure of the creature in theological, and extra-theological, texts.

MemberNicholas Perez

Currently an independent research focusing on religion, philosophy, and history who is hoping to attend the University of Louisville for the PhD in Humanities program.  Planned research is over Teresa of Avila’s epistemology of the body. Research interests include Virgin Mary, primarily theological conceptions conerning her and cultural reception of her; theology and history of Christianity (primary periods ancient, medieval, and postmodern), particular focus on concepts of salvation, the Eucharist, gender, and the body; female Christian mystics, primarily Catherine of Siena and Teresa of Avila; Biblical exegesis, translation, and literary analysis; connections between literature and religion; philosophy of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Nietzsche, Freud, Heideggar, Bataille, Beauvoir, Kirsteva, and Irigaray (primary philosophic interest is existential phenomenology).