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MemberRichard J. Callahan, Jr.

Material histories of religion, emphasizing the work of people in and on the world, stemming from American history and culture through the networks of resource extraction to oceanic spaces and the dark of coal mines. Comparative studies of religion and globalization embedded in those networks, influencing and influenced by the relentless frames of capitalism and “civilization.”

MemberNicholas Karn

My work relates to two principal themes or research interests. I work on the history of English law in the central middle ages, and have published and spoken on the cultural and social history of law, as well as one specific legal texts. I also work on the cultural and social history of religion, and have worked on both Benedictine monasticism and the work and impact of the episcopate.

MemberBrian W. Ogilvie

I am an intellectual and cultural historian of Europe, with special interests in the history of science, scholarship, and religion from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment. I am currently Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Chair of the History Department. I have previously served as Graduate Program Director and Associate Chair/Scheduling Officer in History, as Co-Director of the Digital Humanities Initiative in the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, and as Director of the university’s Oxford Summer Seminar. I am engaged in several research projects in cultural history and the history of science. I teach Renaissance and early modern European history, history of science, and history of religion.

MemberCollin Cornell

Collin Cornell is visiting assistant professor for the School of Theology at Sewanee: The University of the South. He edited the volume Divine Doppelgängers: YHWH’s Ancient Look-Alikes for Penn State University Press, and his monograph, Divine Aggression in Psalms and Inscriptions, is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. His interests include history of religions, biblical theology, and pedagogy.

MemberChelsea Miller

I currently work in the Acquisitions department at the State University of New York Press as an Editorial Assistant, where I work with authors and editors to publish scholarship in the fields of history, politics, religion, and more.I have experience in writing, editing, curatorial practice, teaching, web development, and event management. I am interested in the intellectual and physical spaces in which the past and present collide. In my personal work, I focus especially on writing history for digital and print media and examining the role of the activist-scholar through public history and public memory projects.

MemberIlyse Morgenstein Fuerst

I am Ilyse R. Morgenstein Fuerst and, yes, that whole bit after the R. is my surname. I’m an assistant professor of religion and the current director of Middle East studies at the University of Vermont. I’m also the co-chair of the Study of Islam Unit at the American Academy of Religion, the editor of the Islam section for Religion Compass, and on various editorial and advisory boards for Islamic studies journals and projects. Generally speaking, my published work addresses South Asian Islam, theories and history of religion, and the racialization of Islam. My first book, Indian Muslim Minorities and the 1857 Rebellion, was published by I.B. Tauris in 2017. I’m working on other projects, mostly around boundaries of the study of Islam, memorialization of Islamic history in South Asia, and histories of Islamophobia and the racialization of Muslims.

MemberPatrick McCullough

…Ph.D., History of Religion, Early Christianity, University of California, Los Angeles, 2018
M.A., History of Religion, Early Christianity, University of California, Los Angeles, 2011…

I currently serve as an Upper School History Teacher at Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles (US History; The World and Europe). In the classroom, I guide students as they further embrace their own analytical voices on difficult topics with confidence and clarity. I have broad teaching expertise that spans history, religion, and literature from the ancient world to the present. In my classes, I help students make creative connections between the ancient and modern; between dense theoretical materials and popular culture. In their evaluations, my students often note how much they appreciate an instructor who pushes the boundaries of their analytical abilities but also meets them where they are. I earned a Ph.D. in History of Religion, Early Christianity, at UCLA, where I also served as a regular Teaching Fellow. In my academic work, I examine representations of ideologies and identities in ancient Jewish and Christian texts and their modern interpreters. My work problematizes the modern categories we deploy in our discussions of antiquity and religion. My dissertation, “Apocalypse and Difference: Rereading Cultural Boundaries in Early Christian Texts,” explores how apocalyptic discourse in early Christian texts maintains group boundaries as their Christ-confessing authors simultaneously participate in the discursive practices of their ancient Mediterranean society and culture.