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Membernispero

I am a scholar of U.S. and Latin American literature and culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In particular, my first book and my current projects reflect a transnational approach to the cultural history of capitalism. They address a common broad question: how are our local and national identities shaped by and through popular economic and political narratives? My book, A Cultural History of Underdevelopment: Latin America in the U.S. Imagination (University of Virginia Press, 2016) explores how Americans have mapped the hemisphere from the mid-19th century to the end of the Cold War in terms of an economic geography in which the United States was a rich nation among poor ones. The most common term for this geography and condition of poverty has been “underdevelopment,” a term from the social sciences that has also drawn on cultural generalizations about the origins and the spaces of poverty. Since I arrived at Wayne State, I have also taught and writen about the history and culture of Detroit, especially in the ways its image circulates outside the city–as the Motor City, Motown, the Arsenal of Democracy, and the city of ruins. My new project, Keywords for the Age of Austerity, is an evolving online work of historical etymology and cultural criticism. I trace the history of economic concepts in the mass media, uncovering the history and common use of popular terms like “accountability,” “entrepreneur,” and “innovation.”

MemberCamille Cole

I am a Junior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Cambridge, working on the histories of environment, law, and capitalism in late Ottoman Iraq. My dissertation, “Empire on Edge: Land, Law, and Capital in Gilded Age Basra, 1884-1914,” uses microhistory to explore how individual capitalists shaped the emergence of capitalism and modern state practice by manipulating novel state vocabularies and bureaucratic instruments. I have a second project on histories of technology in the 19th century Middle East, focusing on steamships and irrigation projects in southern Iraq and Iran. I am also beginning work on a new project looking at the transnational history of concessions between Latin America and the Middle East.

MemberJason W. Moore

Jason W. Moore is an environmental historian and historical geographer at Binghamton University, where he is professor of sociology. He is author or editor, most recently, of Capitalism in the Web of Life (Verso, 2015), Capitalocene o Antropocene? (Ombre Corte, 2017), Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism (PM Press, 2016), and, with Raj Patel, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things(University of California Press, 2017). His books and essays on environmental history, capitalism, and social theory have been widely recognized, including the Alice Hamilton Prize of the American Society for Environmental History (2003), the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the Section on the Political Economy of the World-System (American Sociological Association, 2002 for articles, and 2015 for Web of Life), and the Byres and Bernstein Prize in Agrarian Change (2011). He coordinates the World-Ecology Research Network.

MemberJesse Sadler

I am an early modern historian interested in the social and familial basis of politics, religion, and trade. I received a Ph.D. in European History from UCLA in 2015 and have taught courses on cultural and intellectual history of early modern Europe and the Atlantic. My research investigates the familial basis of the early modern capitalism through archival research on two mercantile families from Antwerp at the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seventeenth century. I am currently working on a manuscript that argues for the significance of sibling relationships and inheritance in the development of early modern trade. My manuscript places concepts such as patriarchy, emotion, exile, and friendship at the heart of the efficacy of long-distance trade networks and the growth of capitalism.

MemberDeborah Dubald

hold a PhD in History and Civilisation from the European University Institute, Florence (2019) with my thesis Capital Nature: a History of French Municipal Museums of Natural History, 1795-1870. My doctoral thesis was awarded the 2020 James Kaye Memorial Prize for the Best Thesis in History and Visuality. In September 2020, I started working as a Research and Teaching Fellow in the History of Science (ATER) in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Strasbourg. From 2018 to 2020 I taught Modern European History at the University of Lille. My research deals with practices and cultures of natural history in the nineteenth century, with a focus on museums and collections of natural history; scientific practices; the production of scientific space. I am generally interested in the history of the relation between nature and the human societies. My current research interest is about the use of scientific and natural history collections in environmental history. I am also working at the publication of my thesis.

MemberPeter Mondelli

Peter Mondelli has served on the faculty at UNT’s College of Music since 2012.  His main research projects consider the impact of print culture and bourgeois capitalism on nineteenth-century Parisian opera.  Other areas of interest include oral song culture in the late eighteenth-century, early music and musicology in fin-de-siècle France, and the relationship between music studies and the posthumanities.

MemberRyan Patten

A PhD candidate in Editorial Studies at Boston University’s Editorial Institute, where my dissertation is a critical edition of a selection of Maurice Greene’s (1696–1755) orchestral anthems. Other interests include: music and cultural history of the Early Modern Era, especially of Britain and North America; sacred music and theology; Irish and Scottish music; textual criticism; and bibliography.