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MemberStylianos (Stelios) Giamarelos

Dr Stylianos (Stelios) Giamarelos is an architect, historian and theorist of postmodern culture. Before undertaking a PhD in Architectural History & Theory at the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL, he studied Architecture, Philosophy, and History of Science and Technology in Athens. He is currently a Teaching Fellow and module coordinator in Architectural History, Theory & Interdisciplinary Studies at the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL. A founding editor of the Bartlett’s LOBBY magazine (2013-2016), he is also a General Editor for the EAHN’s Architectural Histories since 2017. In 2008, he co-curated ATHENS by SOUND, the National Participation of Greece in the 11th Biennale of Architecture in Venice. Among others, he has published in the Journal of Architecture, Journal of Architectural Education, Architectural Design, Footprint, OASE, FRAME, San Rocco, and Metalocus. In 2018, he was a Judge for the international Undergraduate Awards and a finalist runner-up for the biannual EAHN Publication Award. Research Areas include: postmodern and digital architectural cultures; transcultural authorships of regional architectures; oral histories in architecture; philosophy, science, technology and narrative (from comics and literature to videogames) in architectural histories, theories and practices.

MemberA.Bowdoin Van Riper

In my “day job” I work for the Martha’s Vineyard Museum as a researcher, reference librarian, journal editor, and public historian . . . helping to introduce visitors (both on-site and virtual) to the history and culture of a hundred-square-mile island off the southern coast of New England. In the wider academic world, I’m a historian who’s interested in the intersections of science and technology with society and culture, who originally worked on the history of geology and archaeology and is probably best known these days for writing about images of science and technology in popular culture, particularly film and television. Note: I omit the space between my first initial and middle name in my HC profile to keep the site from parsing the name incorrectly; if searching for me outside HC, use “A. Bowdoin Van Riper”  🙂

MemberGabriel Finkelstein

My biography of Emil du Bois-Reymond, the most important forgotten intellectual of the nineteenth century, received an Honorable Mention for History of Science, Medicine, and Technology at the 2013 PROSE Awards, was shortlisted for the 2014 John Pickstone Prize (Britain’s most prestigious award for the best scholarly book in the history of science), and was named by the American Association for the Advancement of Science as one of the Best Books of 2014.

MemberDana Simmons

I am a historian of science and technology. My research interests include hunger, nutrition, political economy, the human sciences, feminist theory and technopolitics. My book, Vital Minimum: Need, Science and Politics in Modern France, traces the history of the concept of the “vital minimum”–the living wage, a measure of physical and social needs. In the book I am concerned with intersections between technologies of measurement, such as calorimeters and social surveys, and technologies of wages and welfare, such as minimum wages, poor aid, and welfare programs. How we define and measure needs tells us about the social authority of nature and the physical nature of inequality. I am faculty co-organizer of the UCR Science Studies group, which is committed to building a community inclusive of indigenous, minority and marginalized knowledge makers in STS.

MemberIngo Frank

I am a digital humanist and data librarian with an academic background in philosophy, information and computer science. My research interests are applied ontology, knowledge organization, and diagrammatic reasoning for digital history considered as historical information science. Currently I am working with semantic web and linked data technologies in order to build document and research data repositories to support interdisciplinary research on historical and social phenomena.

MemberAllison Margaret Bigelow

I study the language of colonial science and technology, mostly agriculture and metalwork. By finding texts that bridge the “trade gap” of history and literature – technical treatises, memoriales de arbitristas, legal papers – my research shows how we can unearth the rich literacies and intellectual agencies of understudied groups like women and indigenous experts.