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MemberNicholas Perez

Currently an independent research focusing on religion, philosophy, and history who is hoping to attend the University of Louisville for the PhD in Humanities program.  Planned research is over Teresa of Avila’s epistemology of the body. Research interests include Virgin Mary, primarily theological conceptions conerning her and cultural reception of her; theology and history of Christianity (primary periods ancient, medieval, and postmodern), particular focus on concepts of salvation, the Eucharist, gender, and the body; female Christian mystics, primarily Catherine of Siena and Teresa of Avila; Biblical exegesis, translation, and literary analysis; connections between literature and religion; philosophy of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Nietzsche, Freud, Heideggar, Bataille, Beauvoir, Kirsteva, and Irigaray (primary philosophic interest is existential phenomenology).

MemberRobert von Thaden, Jr.

I trained as a biblical scholar under Vernon K. Robbins at Emory University and use his sociorhetorical interpretive analytic to perform my biblical interpretations. In that role, I am one of the associate editors of the Emory Studies in Early Christianity book series (SBL Press) along with Bart B. Bruehler. As a teacher, I am a generalist who offers a wide selection of courses at my institution. I am the only biblical scholar in my department, so I offer the courses on biblical (and other sacred) texts as well as in the history of Christianity: Sacred Texts, New Testament & Christian Origins, Women & Scripture, Desert Mothers & Fathers, and Christianity. I also offer a range of other courses, such as: What Is Religion?,  American Religion, Death & Dying, and Apocalypse to Zombie.

MemberSean Hannan

…ed in Book XI of the Confessions and putting them into conversation with Augustine’s other writings (including the City of God).  The end goal is to see how Augustine’s understanding of time bears upon his understanding of transformation, both personal and historical.  That, in turn, helps us to reflect on the relationship to temporality we ourselves assume whenever we talk about personal conversion or historical change.

Digital Pedagogies in the History of Christianity 

As part of my Digital Humanities mandate at MacEwan University, I have been working to craft new assignments that organically incorporate digital resources, ranging from mapping programs to timeline-creation software and beyond. The goal is not simply to ‘spice up’ the syllabus, but to rethink course design in light of twenty-first-century tools. As a corollary to that project, I have been trying to publish more pi…

Sean Hannan (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 2016) is an Assistant Professor in the Humanities at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. His research focuses on the intellectual history of Christianity, with emphases on late antiquity, North Africa, and the philosophy of time. While his doctoral project dealt with temporality in the works of Augustine of Hippo, his current research broadens out to incorporate alternative accounts of time drawn from antiquity and the Middle Ages. At MacEwan, he has a mandate to make use of methods from the digital humanities when teaching courses on ancient, medieval, and early modern history.

MemberBeatrice Marovich

I am currently an Assistant Professor of Theology at Hanover College, in southern Indiana. My research is concerned with the intellectual history of Christianity, and the secular afterlives of theological concepts. I am interested in both the erasures and the endurances of the theological within secular frames of thought. And I am especially interested in how these traces of the theological have influenced the way we think about the natural world, other creatures, our mortal bodies (and their eventual destinies). My current book project, Creature Feeling: Power and Affect in Creaturely Life examines the figure of the creature in theological, and extra-theological, texts.

MemberJason Bruner

I am a scholar of religious history with a particular interest in the intersected histories of Christian missions, European imperialism, and the growth of Christianities in Sub-Saharan Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries. I am intrigued by the religious and cultural exchanges between European missionaries and those who converted, with a focus upon the agency of African peoples. My first book, Living Salvation in the East African Revival in Uganda, which is forthcoming with the University of Rochester Press, is a history of the East African (Balokole) Revival in Uganda from the early 1930s to the early 1960s. While the revival was a conversionary movement that proclaimed a Christian message of salvation, this project examines the ways in which salvation was not simply a personal, eternal aspiration for the Balokole, but rather a comprehensive way of life. This book will illuminate the many ways in which the revival created a new lifestyle for those who converted through its message, which had profound impacts upon revivalists’ understanding of themselves and how they ought to relate to their families, communities, societies, and nations.

MemberCharles Tieszen

Charles is a historian of religious thought, specializing in the interactions between medieval Muslim and Christian communities as well as the interface of Islam and Christianity. He is interested in how Muslims and Christians engaged one another through religious dialogue and the theological underpinnings of these encounters. He also reflects on the current state of Muslim-Christian dialogue through his research, writing, and teaching.

MemberPatrick McCullough

I currently serve as an Upper School History Teacher at Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles (US History; The World and Europe). In the classroom, I guide students as they further embrace their own analytical voices on difficult topics with confidence and clarity. I have broad teaching expertise that spans history, religion, and literature from the ancient world to the present. In my classes, I help students make creative connections between the ancient and modern; between dense theoretical materials and popular culture. In their evaluations, my students often note how much they appreciate an instructor who pushes the boundaries of their analytical abilities but also meets them where they are. I earned a Ph.D. in History of Religion, Early Christianity, at UCLA, where I also served as a regular Teaching Fellow. In my academic work, I examine representations of ideologies and identities in ancient Jewish and Christian texts and their modern interpreters. My work problematizes the modern categories we deploy in our discussions of antiquity and religion. My dissertation, “Apocalypse and Difference: Rereading Cultural Boundaries in Early Christian Texts,” explores how apocalyptic discourse in early Christian texts maintains group boundaries as their Christ-confessing authors simultaneously participate in the discursive practices of their ancient Mediterranean society and culture.