Search

MemberQuinn Dombrowski

Quinn Dombrowski supports digitally-facilitated research in Stanford’s Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages as the Academic Technology Specialist. She has been involved with digital humanities since 2004, working on a variety of projects including a medieval Russian database, a digital research environment for Bulgarian linguistics and folklore, a Drupal-based platform for developing digital catalogues raisonnés for art historians, and the financial papers of George Washington. From 2008-2012, Quinn was on the program staff of the Mellon-funded digital humanities cyberinfrastructure initiative Project Bamboo. Her article “What Ever Happened to Project Bamboo?” reflects on the rise and fall of that effort. Quinn was a co-founder of DHCommons, a directory of digital humanities projects with an overlay journal, and was the director of the DiRT (Digital Research Tools) directory from 2010 until 2017. She has served on the executive board of the Association for Computers and the Humanities from 2014-2018. She is a co-editor of the Coding for Humanists series of practical, hands-on guides to digital humanities tools and technologies, and was the author of the inaugural volume, Drupal for Humanists. Her other book, Crescat Graffiti, Vita Excolatur, documents graffiti in the University of Chicago’s Regenstein library. Quinn previously spent a decade working in central IT organizations at the University of Chicago and UC Berkeley, in various roles ranging from managing a scholarly communications group, coordinating digital humanities consulting, and supporting a high-performance computing cluster. Quinn’s interests include the old Novgorod birchbark letters, digital humanities infrastructure, and failure. She helps wrangle the Stanford Digital Humanities website, and occasionally tweets at @quinnanya.

MemberTiffany Funk

Tiffany Funk (PhD) is an artist, critical theorist, and researcher specializing in emerging media, computer art, video games, and performance art practices. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the Video Game Art Reader and Co-founding Lecturer and Academic Advisor of IDEAS (Interdisciplinary Education in the Arts)—an intermedia, theory and practice-based Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

MemberDanielle Sofer

Dr. Danielle Sofer (she/her/they/them) is Executive Director of the LGBTQ+ Music Study Groups. Dr. Sofer’s recent publications concern various means of electronic mediation, exploring how gender dynamically cuts across current social justice activism, postcolonial resistances, as well as historical and systemic constitutions of race and sexuality. Such topics feature extensively in a forthcoming monograph, Making Sex Sound: Vectors of Difference in Electronic Music (MIT Press), the first book to explore sexuality in electronic music. A nomad by blood, generations before her moved about East of the Mediterranean, and she’s never lived anywhere longer than 3 years. She was a professor for 10 years – recently quit her job over sexual harassment and bullying – and is now more determined than ever to resist those for whom equality feels like oppression.   A music theorist attuned to gendered hearings and sensitive to cultural context, Dr. Sofer has published on music by Elizabeth Maconchy, Juliana Hodkinson, Alice Shields, Donna Summer, and Barry Truax and on the reception of Adorno’s ‘listening typology’. She completed a PhD with distinction at the Kunstuniversität Graz.   Her volume Elizabeth Maconchy: Music as Impassioned Argument (Universal Edition, 2018), edited with Christa Brüstle, features contributions from the composer’s two daughters, family photos, and a complete list of the composer’s works presented for the first time. Recent articles include an analysis of gender and sexuality in music by Barry Truax (Organised Sound, 2018), and ‘Breaking Silence, Breaching Censorship: “Ongoing Interculturality’” in Alice Shields’s Electronic Opera Apocalypse’, forthcoming in American Music journal, awarded subventions from the Society for Music Theory and the American Musicological Society’s AMS 75 Publication Awards for Young Scholars Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Danielle graduated summa cum laude from the State University of New York at New Paltz with a BA in music performance (viola and piano) and honours. She holds Master’s degrees from Binghamton University (New York) in piano performance and Stony Brook University (New York) in music history and theory, with a thesis on Prokofiev’s opera The Gambler, a project that brought her to St. Petersburg, Russia as an Erasmus student. Prior to joining the faculty of the Institute for Musical Criticism and Aesthetical Research at the Kunstuniversität Graz, Danielle studied music theory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she was an assistant to Brian Hyer. She has presented on sexuality and electronic music on several occasions, including conferences of the International Computer Music Association, The Society for Music Theory, The Society for Musicology in Ireland, and the Feminist Theory and Music conference. As a violist, pianist, and singer, Danielle has performed in New York City, Boston, San Francisco, Graz, Haifa, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and many smaller cities around the globe. http://daniellessofer.wixsite.com/daniellesofer  

MemberRob Lancefield

Rob Lancefield is Head of IT at the Yale Center for British Art. Previously he led digital work at the Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University, where he led the development and launch of DAC Open Access Images in 2012. He chairs the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) Council of Affiliates, a council of leadership representatives from 28 national and international organizations in the museum field. Rob is a former president of the Museum Computer Network (MCN), the professional organization for people who do digital work in museums, and a co-founding member of the ImageMuse discussion group, which now connects more than 500 digital imaging professionals in museums and other cultural organizations.

MemberJulia Voss

Research Interests:

My current and past work examines how literacy learning and performance take place across spaces and modes ranging across classroom and community settings. Informed by an emphasis on modality, my research focuses on the affordances and constraints of different social, technical, and institutional settings to examine possibilities and call for changes that support more equitable participation of all members.

Professional Interests:

My research on classroom design and writing in the disciplines has increasingly drawn my attention to the institutional and infrastructural work of writing program administration. As writing specialists, we need to continue our decades-long work with colleagues across the university to design effective writing curricula based on our own disciplinary knowledge. However, as (unacknowledged) experts in active learning pedagogies, writing specialists and WPAs also have considerable expertise to contribute to learning space design initiatives, involving stakeholders outside academic departments at the level of the university’s physical facilities.

Teaching Interests:

I teach classes in digital and print composing with an emphasis on (multi)modality, technical communication, writing studies, digital culture.

MemberCaleb Andrew Milligan

I am a Doctoral Candidate and Graduate Teacher of Record in the Department of English at the University of Florida, specializing in comparative media studies, digital humanities, and embodied rhetorics. I teach, research, and publish broadly across intersections between literature, film, and digital media. My current research project, Post-Digital Touch: Writing Embodiments, Affective Interfaces, and Haptic Media, builds from my published and forthcoming work to account for the importance of touch to textual encounters in an age of ubiquitous computing devices which change the ways we compose our media and our bodily selves. In addition to my research agenda and teaching record, I am a 2016-2018 HASTAC scholar, founding member of the TRACE Innovation Initiative, and coordinator of interdisciplinary digital humanities conferences and workshops at UF.

MemberPatrick Finn

I work in a variety of areas related to human performance. My work focuses on the intersection of performance and technology, where “technology” is any form or process that we use to express ourselves. Thus, technology could be anything from the use of story to share information, the application of vocal training to better communicate, or the development of complex computer programs in order to engage the world. Specialties: Performance, Research Methods, Teaching, Drama, Theatre, English Literature, Music, Internet, Web, Culture, Social Media, Information Technology, Culture, Literature, Writing.

MemberEmer McHugh

I graduated with my PhD in Drama and Theatre Studies at NUI Galway in 2019, where I also teach. I am the author of the forthcoming Irish Shakespeares: Gender, Sexuality, and Performance in the Twenty-First Century, currently under contract with Routledge. This is an expansion upon my doctoral dissertation, ‘Shakespeare, Gender, and Contemporary Ireland: Performing and Recreating National Identities’ (fully funded by the Irish Research Council), which looks at contemporary Shakespeare performance by Irish practitioners inside and outside of Ireland, exploring their engagement with gender, queerness, and feminisms, and exploring this in tandem with its contested relationship with issues of Irish national identity. Case studies include Druid Theatre’s Henriad adaptation DruidShakespeare (2015), Shakespeare’s Globe’s production of The Taming of the Shrew (2016), the Abbey Theatre’s production of Twelfh Night (2014), and the Almeida/Harold Pinter Theatre production of Hamlet (2017). My research interests include: early modern performance studies; Shakespeare and Ireland; theatre and celebrity culture; theatre history and historiography; audience and reception studies; contemporary Irish and British performance; and queer and feminist theory and performance. I am currently writing and developing articles and book chapters on Irish Shakespeare performance; Shakespeare on film and celebrity culture; and the terminologies of early modern performance studies. From 2015-2018, I served on the steering committee of the Society for Theatre Research’s New Researchers’ Network. I also co-hosted the podcast Feminist Theatre Squadron, and have contributed my work to Women Are BoringShakespeare in Ireland, and Reviewing Shakespeare. I also teach undergraduates in Drama at NUI Galway, and have also taught in the Discipline of English at NUIG and in the School of English, Drama and Film at University College Dublin. I also teach in the School of English, Trinity College Dublin. I specialise in and have taught classes on theatre histories and historiographies; global Shakespeares; the history and practice of performing Shakespeare; film and Shakespeare; revenge tragedies; approaches to staging classical texts; modern Irish theatre; and comedy in performance. (And, of course, I am always open to specialising in other areas too.)

MemberLeighton Harold Geoffrey Triplow

Australian high tenor Dr Leighton Triplow specialises in the performance and study of early music, particularly that of the English Baroque. A confident, diligent, and enthusiastic young man, he works tirelessly with excellence in practical, theoretical, and administrative realms of the music craft. Leighton completed his PhD (Musicology and Vocal Performance) in his mid-20s at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne. His graduate research explored constructs of gender, performance styles, and character realisation in the vocal music of Restoration composer Henry Purcell (1659–1695). 

MemberErik Malcolm Champion

UNESCO Chair of Cultural Heritage and Visualisation, and Professor at Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry, in the Humanities Faculty of Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. The purpose of the Chair is to promote an integrated system of research, training, information and documentation on virtual heritage sites and facilitate collaboration between high-level, internationally-recognized researchers and teaching staff of Curtin University and other institutions throughout the world.   My recent books are Critical Gaming: Interactive History and Virtual Heritage for Routledge’s Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities Series, Playing with the Past (Springer, 2011), editor of Game Mods: Design, Theory and Criticism (ETC Press, 2012) and co-editor of  Cultural Heritage Infrastructures in Digital Humanities (Routledge, 2017).