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MemberChance Bonar

I am a PhD candidate in the Committee on the Study of Religion (New Testament and Early Christianity subfield) at Harvard University. My current course and research interests include the historiographical invention and development of the “Apostolic Fathers,” discourses of heresy and orthodoxy in antiquity, Greek and Coptic papyrology, ancient constructions of ethnic and religious difference, and translation of late ancient and Byzantine apocryphal texts. I am in the early stages of my dissertation, focusing on the Shepherd of Hermas.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberSean Martin

Currently (2018) undertaking PhD by practice in filmmaking at Edinburgh Napier University, making an experimental documentary about Scottish metaphysical writer David Lindsay (1876-1945), author of A Voyage to Arcturus, The Haunted Woman, and others. I am also the author of a number of popular history titles, including The Knights Templar: The History & Myths of the Legendary Military Order; The Cathars: The Rise & Fall of the Great Heresy and The Gnostics: The First Christian Heretics.

MemberDonna Arnold

Donna Arnold is the long-time music research librarian at the University of North Texas Music Library, where she serves a diversity of university, local, national, and international patrons. Her work is informed by her own music research interests, which range from Schubert, 17th-century lute music, and Russian Orthodox choral music to American roots music and early jazz.