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MemberAnnelies Cazemier

I am an ancient historian with a particular interest in the Greek world, Hellenistic history, and religion, as well as Greek history during the Roman period. Teaching in a History department at Southampton, I am also increasingly fascinated by the reception of the Greek world in later periods of history. My forthcoming book on Greek Sanctuaries and the Rise of Rome explores the spread of Roman power as seen from religious sites in Greece, the Aegean, and Asia Minor (from the third until the early first century BCE). It brings out the key role of cults and sanctuaries in early exchanges between Greeks, Romans, and Hellenistic rulers – in war, diplomacy, and trade. As part of my work for the Copenhagen Associations Project, I undertook research on ancient Greek associations, carrying out surveys and detailed studies of epigraphic evidence (esp. from the Aegean), and analysing religious aspects, foreign involvement, and relations with Rome. My ongoing research interests include the local histories and wider connections of islands in the Aegean from the fifth century BCE, through the Hellenistic age, into the Roman Imperial period; Greek sanctuaries and their networks; and travel and mobility in the ancient world.

MemberAaron L. Beek

Aaron L. Beek is a philologist and historian with two primary research areas: ancient banditry/piracy and ancient North Africa.  More broadly, he works on a swath of Middle Republic and Hellenistic events, particularly as told and remembered by imperial-era writers centuries later.  Other research interests include Plautus, Latin Patristics (especially Tertullian), and Latin epigraphy (particularly epigraphy in North Africa). He has also worked on history pedagogy, digital humanities, and text analysis.

MemberMicheal Palmer

I am the owner of Greek-Language.com, GreekLinguistics.com, and HellenisticGreek.com. You can find my blog at GreekLanguage.blog. After a career teaching Ancient Greek (both Classical and Hellenistic) and Biblical Studies, I made a radical switch in 2006 taking me much more into the field of modern language acquisition. I now teach both Spanish and English in a dual language elementary school, and I will co-direct an academic-vocabulary development program to support bi-literacy this year (2018-19).

MemberJohannes Bernhardt

I am a cultural historian with focus on the Hellenistic period and museum studies. 1999-2005 studies of Ancient History, Modern History and Archaeology in Freiburg and Paris, 2012 PhD in Freiburg. 2007-2010 Assistant Professor in Freiburg, 2011-2014 in Mannheim, 2015-2016 Postdoc at the Centre for Mediterranean Studies in Bochum. 2017 move to the Badisches Landesmuseum to develop a digitisation concept for the Friedrich Creuzer Collection; since 2018 lead of the Creative Collections project, which is dedicated to the development of new formats for citizen participation and the establishment of new approaches such as design thinking and barcamps.

MemberJody Gordon

Jody Michael Gordon is an Associate Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and an Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP). He received his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, where his dissertation involved an archaeological study of the effects of imperialism on local identities in Cyprus during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. In addition to working in Cyprus, Jody has excavated in Tunisia, Italy, Spain, and Greece, and his research interests include Roman archaeology, cultural identity, ancient imperialism, and computer applications in archaeology. See here for more on Jody’s teaching at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

MemberPaul Michael Kurtz

I am a modern cultural, intellectual, and religious historian. My research centers on the production and circulation of knowledge about the ancient world both in and between Europe and the Middle East during the 19th and 20th centuries. In my early work, I concentrated on the technical scholarly practices as well as the nationalist, political, and theological forces that shaped representations of early Judaism in the German Empire, esp in biblical, classical, and oriental studies. My latest work examines philology as the premier science of the nineteenth century, focusing on the networks, media, infrastructure, and instruments involved in collecting, processing, and reproducing texts. This research expands traditional work on the history of the humanities by combining an understanding of global and colonial history, media theory, history of science, and science and technology studies.   My work appears in the finest journals of history, religion, and culture, such as History & TheoryCritical Inquiry, Central European History, and Harvard Theological Review. My first monograph, on the historiography of ancient Israel in the German Empire, was published by Mohr Siebeck in 2018.   Since 2019, I have been a Research Fellow of the Flemish Research Council (FWO) at Ghent University. Before coming to Ghent, I was a Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Cambridge and Queens’ College (2017–19) and, prior, a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Göttingen (2016–17). In 2016, I obtained my PhD, with highest distinction, from Göttingen, where I was also a Fulbright Scholar. During doctoral studies, I held research fellowships at the University of Chicago, Leibniz Institute of European History (Mainz), Max Weber Centre for Advanced Studies (Erfurt), and Ghent. This followed an MDiv at Princeton Theological Seminary.   In addition to the FWO, I have secured funding from the European Commission (Horizon2020), Fulbright Program, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), and American Schools of Oriental Research.

MemberRonald Troxel

From January, 1991 through May, 2016 I taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I began as academic staff but eventually transitioned to tenured faculty, achieving the rank of Professor by retirement in May, 2016. I taught undergraduate courses in beginning and intermediate Biblical Hebrew, introductory courses in Hebrew Bible and Early Christian Literature, Prophets of the Bible, History-telling in the Bible, Jewish Literature of the Greco-Roman Period, The Gospels, and Pauline Christianity. In our graduate program in Hebrew Bible I taught year-long studies on the Hebrew books of the Pentateuch, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Job, Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Composition, Syriac Language and Literature, and graduate seminars on The Book of the Twelve, Philology and Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, and Jewish Hellenistic Literature. I continue to guide the work of dissertators and serve on dissertation defense committees. In the fall of 2017 I will join the Minister of Faith Formation at Wayzata Community Church, Rustin Comer (Ph.D. candidate in theology at Claremont Graduate University) in offering a full curriculum of biblical and theological courses in the church’s adult education program. From January, 2010 through May, 2014 I served as chair of the Department of Hebrew and Semitic Studies, overseeing the transfer of its program of modern Hebrew into the Jewish Studies Program and the merger of the program in Hebrew Bible with Classics to form a Department of Classical and Near Eastern studies.