Search

MemberAnnelies Cazemier

I am an ancient historian with a particular interest in the Greek world, Hellenistic history, and religion, as well as Greek history during the Roman period. Teaching in a History department at Southampton, I am also increasingly fascinated by the reception of the Greek world in later periods of history. My forthcoming book on Greek Sanctuaries and the Rise of Rome explores the spread of Roman power as seen from religious sites in Greece, the Aegean, and Asia Minor (from the third until the early first century BCE). It brings out the key role of cults and sanctuaries in early exchanges between Greeks, Romans, and Hellenistic rulers – in war, diplomacy, and trade. As part of my work for the Copenhagen Associations Project, I undertook research on ancient Greek associations, carrying out surveys and detailed studies of epigraphic evidence (esp. from the Aegean), and analysing religious aspects, foreign involvement, and relations with Rome. My ongoing research interests include the local histories and wider connections of islands in the Aegean from the fifth century BCE, through the Hellenistic age, into the Roman Imperial period; Greek sanctuaries and their networks; and travel and mobility in the ancient world.

MemberThomas J. Nelson

…ference 2019, London, 4–8 Jul.

2019: “Sweet and Shrill Songbirds: The Sounds of Lament in Graeco-Roman Elegy”, ‘Song, Lament, Love: Harking Back to the Sounds of Elegy’, 12th Celtic Conference in Classics, Coimbra, Portugal, 26–29 June

2019: “The Coma Stratonices: Hair Encomia, Queenly Power, and Ptolemaic-Seleucid Rivalry”, ‘Cherchez la femme: Women in Hellenistic History, Historiography and Reception’, 12th Celtic Conference in Classics, Coimbra, Portugal, 26–29 June

2019: “Intercultural Indexicality? Markers of Allusion Between Greece and the Near East”, Advanced Seminar in the Humanities, Venice International University, San Servolo, Venice, April 6th-13th

2019: “Scholarship and Learning in Hellenistic P…

Tom Nelson is a Research Fellow in Classics at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. In 2018, he completed his PhD at Trinity College, supervised by Professor Richard Hunter (‘Early Greek Indexicality: Markers of Allusion in Archaic Greek Poetry’). His thesis explores the so-called “Alexandrian footnote” and markers of intertextuality in Latin and Greek Literature, with a particular focus on archaic and classical Greek poetry. It examines the manner in which these poets self-consciously signalled their interactions with other texts and traditions. He completed the MSt in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature at the University of Oxford, writing a dissertation on the various analogies and allegories employed to conceptualise victories over the Galatians in Hellenistic Literature and Art. From 1 October 2018, he will be a Research Fellow in Classics at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He has recently co-organised a conference on Hellenistic Poetry Beyond Callimachean Aesthetics, 1-3 September 2016 (http://www.castingoffshadows2016.co.uk/), and was also a member of the organising committee for the Cambridge AHRC DTP’s Conference on Time and Temporality, 14-16 September 2016. Teaching materials for his undergraduates is available at http://www.thomas-j-nelson.co.uk/teaching.html. He is very open to any kind of collaborative research and happy to be contacted about any ideas for collaboration, however preliminary.

MemberAaron L. Beek

Aaron L. Beek is a philologist and historian with two primary research areas: ancient banditry/piracy and ancient North Africa.  More broadly, he works on a swath of Middle Republic and Hellenistic events, particularly as told and remembered by imperial-era writers centuries later.  Other research interests include Plautus, Latin Patristics (especially Tertullian), and Latin epigraphy (particularly epigraphy in North Africa). He has also worked on history pedagogy, digital humanities, and text analysis.

MemberMicheal Palmer

I am the owner of Greek-Language.com, GreekLinguistics.com, and HellenisticGreek.com. You can find my blog at GreekLanguage.blog. After a career teaching Ancient Greek (both Classical and Hellenistic) and Biblical Studies, I made a radical switch in 2006 taking me much more into the field of modern language acquisition. I now teach both Spanish and English in a dual language elementary school, and I will co-direct an academic-vocabulary development program to support bi-literacy this year (2018-19).

MemberJacquelyn Clements

I’m currently a Metadata Assistant at the Getty Research Institute, where I work on digital humanities projects related to the Getty Provenance Index (GPI) remodel. This includes the standardization and reconciliation of data from the GPI as we transition to a Linked Open Data model, which will virtually unite millions of records pertinent to the study of the history of collecting, provenance, and the art market. Through data cleaning and management, I help facilitate art historical research both now and for the future. My current project assists in the production and publication of data related to the German Sales II Project (1900-1929). My academic interests range from the topography, sculpture, and vase painting of Classical Greece – I wrote my dissertation on Athenian autochthony and identity during the Peloponnesian War – to research pertaining to the provenance of Greek and Roman antiquities and the history of travel, collecting, and display of works of ancient art.

MemberJody Gordon

Jody Michael Gordon is an Associate Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and an Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP). He received his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, where his dissertation involved an archaeological study of the effects of imperialism on local identities in Cyprus during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. In addition to working in Cyprus, Jody has excavated in Tunisia, Italy, Spain, and Greece, and his research interests include Roman archaeology, cultural identity, ancient imperialism, and computer applications in archaeology. See here for more on Jody’s teaching at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

MemberRonald Troxel

From January, 1991 through May, 2016 I taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I began as academic staff but eventually transitioned to tenured faculty, achieving the rank of Professor by retirement in May, 2016. I taught undergraduate courses in beginning and intermediate Biblical Hebrew, introductory courses in Hebrew Bible and Early Christian Literature, Prophets of the Bible, History-telling in the Bible, Jewish Literature of the Greco-Roman Period, The Gospels, and Pauline Christianity. In our graduate program in Hebrew Bible I taught year-long studies on the Hebrew books of the Pentateuch, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Job, Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Composition, Syriac Language and Literature, and graduate seminars on The Book of the Twelve, Philology and Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, and Jewish Hellenistic Literature. I continue to guide the work of dissertators and serve on dissertation defense committees. In the fall of 2017 I will join the Minister of Faith Formation at Wayzata Community Church, Rustin Comer (Ph.D. candidate in theology at Claremont Graduate University) in offering a full curriculum of biblical and theological courses in the church’s adult education program. From January, 2010 through May, 2014 I served as chair of the Department of Hebrew and Semitic Studies, overseeing the transfer of its program of modern Hebrew into the Jewish Studies Program and the merger of the program in Hebrew Bible with Classics to form a Department of Classical and Near Eastern studies.

MemberHeather D Baker

As an Assyriologist who has also trained in archaeology and gained considerable experience of Near Eastern excavation, my primary interest is in combining textual information and material culture in the study of Mesopotamian society and economy. I apply this approach to the study of the Babylonian city and to investigating house and household. I am currently PI of an international project, Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. Research Interests My work focuses on the social, political and economic history and material culture of 1st millennium BC Mesopotamia, with a particular interest in Babylonian urbanism and the built environment, and in the Neo-Assyrian royal household. My research and publications cover the following topics:

  • urbanism and the built environment
  • religious architecture
  • house and household
  • integration of textual and archaeological data
  • Hellenistic Babylonia (especially the city of Uruk)
  • the Assyrian royal palace and household
  • onomastics and naming practices
  • prosopography
  • slavery
  • society and economy
  • political history
  • cuneiform archives and archival practices

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq