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MemberAnnelies Cazemier

I am an ancient historian with a particular interest in the Greek world, Hellenistic history, and religion, as well as Greek history during the Roman period. Teaching in a History department at Southampton, I am also increasingly fascinated by the reception of the Greek world in later periods of history. My forthcoming book on Greek Sanctuaries and the Rise of Rome explores the spread of Roman power as seen from religious sites in Greece, the Aegean, and Asia Minor (from the third until the early first century BCE). It brings out the key role of cults and sanctuaries in early exchanges between Greeks, Romans, and Hellenistic rulers – in war, diplomacy, and trade. As part of my work for the Copenhagen Associations Project, I undertook research on ancient Greek associations, carrying out surveys and detailed studies of epigraphic evidence (esp. from the Aegean), and analysing religious aspects, foreign involvement, and relations with Rome. My ongoing research interests include the local histories and wider connections of islands in the Aegean from the fifth century BCE, through the Hellenistic age, into the Roman Imperial period; Greek sanctuaries and their networks; and travel and mobility in the ancient world.

MemberAaron L. Beek

Aaron L. Beek is a philologist and historian with two primary research areas: ancient banditry/piracy and ancient North Africa.  More broadly, he works on a swath of Middle Republic and Hellenistic events, particularly as told and remembered by imperial-era writers centuries later.  Other research interests include Plautus, Latin Patristics (especially Tertullian), and Latin epigraphy (particularly epigraphy in North Africa). He has also worked on history pedagogy, digital humanities, and text analysis.

MemberMicheal Palmer

I am the owner of Greek-Language.com, GreekLinguistics.com, and HellenisticGreek.com. You can find my blog at GreekLanguage.blog. After a career teaching Ancient Greek (both Classical and Hellenistic) and Biblical Studies, I made a radical switch in 2006 taking me much more into the field of modern language acquisition. I now teach both Spanish and English in a dual language elementary school, and I will co-direct an academic-vocabulary development program to support bi-literacy this year (2018-19).

MemberThomas J. Nelson

…ference 2019, London, 4–8 Jul.

2019: “Sweet and Shrill Songbirds: The Sounds of Lament in Graeco-Roman Elegy”, ‘Song, Lament, Love: Harking Back to the Sounds of Elegy’, 12th Celtic Conference in Classics, Coimbra, Portugal, 26–29 June

2019: “The Coma Stratonices: Hair Encomia, Queenly Power, and Ptolemaic-Seleucid Rivalry”, ‘Cherchez la femme: Women in Hellenistic History, Historiography and Reception’, 12th Celtic Conference in Classics, Coimbra, Portugal, 26–29 June

2019: “Intercultural Indexicality? Markers of Allusion Between Greece and the Near East”, Advanced Seminar in the Humanities, Venice International University, San Servolo, Venice, April 6th-13th

2019: “Scholarship and Learning in Hellenistic P…

I am a Research Fellow in Classics at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. My research focuses on the poetics and politics of Greek poetry from the archaic period to the Hellenistic world. I’m currently writing a book on the ‘pre-Alexandrian footnote’ and other markers of intertextuality in archaic and classical Greek literature. I explore how the earliest known Greek poets self-consciously acknowledged the familiarity of their subject matter and signalled their references to tradition – placing markers in their works for alert audiences to recognise. This kind of signposting is often considered the preserve of later literary cultures, closely linked with the development of libraries, literacy and writing. But I argue that these same devices were already deeply engrained in our earliest oral archaic Greek poetry. My other major research interest lies in the field of Hellenistic poetry, where I’m especially interested in the fragments and traces of poetic traditions beyond Ptolemaic Alexandria. In particular, I’m currently studying Attalid and Seleucid poetic traditions, as well as Hellenistic epic fragments more generally. As a student, I completed my PhD at Trinity College, Cambridge, supervised by Professor Richard Hunter; before that, I studied at the University of Oxford, completing both my BA and MSt at University College. I’ve co-organised a number of conferences, including ‘Hellenistic Poetry Beyond Callimachean Aesthetics’ (September 2016), the Cambridge AHRC DTP’s Conference on Time and Temporality (September 2016), and the Cambridge Laurence Seminar on Collaboration and Ancient Literature (June 2020). For the 2019 CA/FIEC conference, I also organised a panel entitled ‘Poetics Between Greece and the Near East’ (July 2019). Teaching materials for my undergraduates is available at http://www.thomas-j-nelson.co.uk/teaching.html. I’m very open to any kind of collaborative research and happy to be contacted about any ideas for collaboration, however preliminary.

MemberJohannes Bernhardt

I am a cultural historian with focus on the Hellenistic period and museum studies. 1999-2005 studies of Ancient History, Modern History and Archaeology in Freiburg and Paris, 2012 PhD in Freiburg. 2007-2010 Assistant Professor in Freiburg, 2011-2014 in Mannheim, 2015-2016 Postdoc at the Centre for Mediterranean Studies in Bochum. 2017 move to the Badisches Landesmuseum to develop a digitisation concept for the Friedrich Creuzer Collection; since 2018 lead of the Creative Collections project, which is dedicated to the development of new formats for citizen participation and the establishment of new approaches such as design thinking and barcamps.

MemberPaul Michael Kurtz

My research centers on intellectual culture in Germany from 1795 to 1920, with a focus on the history of the humanities – especially classical, biblical, orientalist, and theological scholarship. Thus far, I have concentrated on representations of ancient Judaism and their embeddedness in modern cultural, political, and religious complexes. These inquiries contribute, more broadly, to historiography, European history, and history of knowledge.

MemberJody Gordon

Jody Michael Gordon is an Associate Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and an Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP). He received his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, where his dissertation involved an archaeological study of the effects of imperialism on local identities in Cyprus during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. In addition to working in Cyprus, Jody has excavated in Tunisia, Italy, Spain, and Greece, and his research interests include Roman archaeology, cultural identity, ancient imperialism, and computer applications in archaeology. See here for more on Jody’s teaching at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

MemberMichail Kitsos

Michail Kitsos is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Middle East Studies at the University of Michigan specializing in the History of Judaism and Christianity in Late Antiquity. Kitsos also has an MA in Middle East Studies from the University of Michigan, an MA in Jewish Studies with a major in Rabbinics from Gratz College, Philadelphia, and an MA in Biblical Archaeology from the School of Theology, Department of Theology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His BA is in Theology with a major in the Interpretation of the Old and the New Testament and Patristics from the School of Theology, Department of Theology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens.   His research examines intersectionality, particularly, the crossing of religious and societal boundaries and identity formation of religious groups in late antiquity and the early Byzantine period in the Mediterranean world. Specifically, by comparing Greek and Syriac anti-Jewish multivocal texts known as Adversus or Contra Iudaeos dialogues and Rabbinic multivocal narratives between rabbis and “others, Kitsos explores the mechanisms that create and reinforce the binary of “us” and “them” between religious communities and how this binary affects the process of self-representation on the part of the outsider group or “other.” His work examines the rhetorical use and function of the image of the “other” by both Christians and Rabbis in dialogical literature within its historical context, and it helps to understand the birth, formation, and diffusion of stereotypes—a process evident in late antiquity that still occurs today.   His research languages include Classical, Hellenistic/Koinē, Ecclesiastical, and Medieval Greek; Classical and Ecclesiastical Latin; Biblical and Rabbinic Hebrew; Palestinian and Babylonian Aramaic; Syriac and Coptic.

MemberRonald Troxel

From January, 1991 through May, 2016 I taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I began as academic staff but eventually transitioned to tenured faculty, achieving the rank of Professor by retirement in May, 2016. I taught undergraduate courses in beginning and intermediate Biblical Hebrew, introductory courses in Hebrew Bible and Early Christian Literature, Prophets of the Bible, History-telling in the Bible, Jewish Literature of the Greco-Roman Period, The Gospels, and Pauline Christianity. In our graduate program in Hebrew Bible I taught year-long studies on the Hebrew books of the Pentateuch, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Job, Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Composition, Syriac Language and Literature, and graduate seminars on The Book of the Twelve, Philology and Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, and Jewish Hellenistic Literature. I continue to guide the work of dissertators and serve on dissertation defense committees. In the fall of 2017 I will join the Minister of Faith Formation at Wayzata Community Church, Rustin Comer (Ph.D. candidate in theology at Claremont Graduate University) in offering a full curriculum of biblical and theological courses in the church’s adult education program. From January, 2010 through May, 2014 I served as chair of the Department of Hebrew and Semitic Studies, overseeing the transfer of its program of modern Hebrew into the Jewish Studies Program and the merger of the program in Hebrew Bible with Classics to form a Department of Classical and Near Eastern studies.