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MemberDavid Adler

In my current research project, I will inquire the governing of office work in and through its architectural conditions in late capitalism. Within the framework of an ethnographically extended dispositive analysis, I am especially interested in two aspects. On the one hand, I will investigate spatial control programs, generated by managerial and architectural discourses. An analysis of enacted and embodied practices, which take place with and within such ‘formatted’ spaces, on the other hand, will shift the focus towards the inner restrictions of these programs and local moments of subversion and resistance. Before that I have been working on an interactionist reframing of hegemony anaysis. Starting with the anouncement of Bin Laden’s death by Barack Obama I have traced the emergence of hegemony and conter-hegemony in the international and intranational reactions to the killing of Bin Laden.

MemberJames Pangborn

Trained in 20th-centure American Lit with forays into 18th-C Brits, psychological approaches, poetics, and lit theory (decon., hermeneutics, and Frankfurt-school critical studies), I’ve evolved toward ecocriticism with a perspective I’m calling biopragmatism. Concerned to develop a robust poetics for the present century (and the long haul) I work the intersection of several disciplines and ideas: cognitive studies, especially linguistics; ecology, evolution, and other environmental models and disciplines; the canonical American pragmatists (especially Peirce and Dewey) and their present-day interpreters, and contemplative discipline (e.g. Zen). I think this nexus of theory and praxis offers us a better framework for studying art and culture, and a much better rhetorical presence as a discipline among other disciplines, than poststructuralism and/or the cultural studies hegemony presently do. I also write poems.

MemberJoshua Rumbaoa Jerome Garcia

I am a Ph.D. Student in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at the Graduate Theological Union and my research concerns the poetics of liminality and hegemony in the literature of the Hebrew Bible and Ugarit. I interrogate these broader lines of historical-critical inquiry at the intersection of Postcolonial Theory and Gender Theory (particularly Masculinity Studies) while aware of my Filipinx-American social location. I hold master’s degrees from Yale University and Boston University and bachelor’s degrees in psychology and biblical studies from George Fox University.

MemberCaren Kaplan

Caren Kaplan is Professor of American Studies at the University of California at Davis. She is the author of Aerial Aftermaths: Wartime from Above (Duke 2018) and Questions of Travel: Postmodern Discourses of Displacement (Duke 1996) and the co-author/editor of Life in the Age of Drone Warfare (Duke 2017),  Introduction to Women’s Studies: Gender in a Transnational World (McGraw-Hill 2001/2005), Between Woman and Nation: Transnational Feminisms and the State (Duke 1999), and Scattered Hegemonies: Postmodernity and Transnational Feminist Practices (Minnesota 1994) as well as two large-scale, digital multi-media scholarly works, Dead Reckoning (2007) and Precision Targets (2010). She is the series co-editor of Next Wave: New Directions in Women’s Studies for Duke University Press.

MemberNicholas S.M. Matheou

I am a social historian specialising in the Middle East and Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, particularly Anatolia, Upper Mesopotamia and Caucasia (approximately modern-day Turkey, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan, as well as parts of northern Syria and Iraq). In particular my research focuses on the empire of New Rome (“Byzantium”), Armenian and Georgian polities in the central Middle Ages, and the city of Ani, between the ninth to and fourteenth centuries. I also takes a comparative perspective across the region, especially from Kurdish and Ottoman studies, as well as globally, from pre-history to the modern day. Through this research I theorise social-historical themes of hegemony and counterpower, ethnicity and nationhood, and critical political economy before, during and after the rise of capitalism. I aim towards a radical perspective on social history from an anarchist – that is, a methodologically anti-state – standpoint. I received my first degree in Ancient & Medieval History from the University of Edinburgh, before moving to the University of Oxford to complete first a master’s degree in Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, and then a doctoral dissertation in the Faculty of Oriental Studies titled ‘Situating the History attributed to Aristakes Lastiverc‘i: The Empire of New Rome & Caucasia in the Eleventh Century’. During my time as a postgraduate student I co-founded the international research network The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood at The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH), running a number of workshops, conferences and seminar series. At the IHR I will focus on developing my doctoral research into a monograph, and begin a new project titled ‘“The Fate of Unjust Cities”: Global History, Political Economy & the Abandoned City of Ani, 900-1400’. This radical global history and political economy of the abandoned city of Ani in central South Caucasia, modern-day eastern Turkey, will situate the city’s emergence, development and decline between the tenth and fourteenth centuries in macro regional and interregional transformations, particularly the Mediterranean Commercial Revolution and the emergent world-system generated by Mongol Eurasian hegemony, in connected micro analysis of developing social relations in the urban space. The project draws on Ani’s rich material remains, particularly the large corpus of monumental epigraphy, as well as numismatics, ceramics and architectural remains, supplemented by Armenian, Georgian, Greek and Islamic (Arabic & Persian) literary sources. Exploring and theorising the political economy of different state-systems, long durée histories of commercial capitalism, and subaltern resistance framed through the heuristics of hegemony and counterpower, the project touches on historical and social themes relevant across time and place.   Normal 0 false false false EN-GB KO X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

MemberAntonio Sotomayor

I am an Associate Professor, Historian, and Librarian of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I also hold faculty appointments in the Departments of Spanish and Portuguese, and Recreation, Sport, and Tourism, and I am an affiliated faculty at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Illinois. My research revolves around issues of idenity/cultural politics, nationalism, international relations, religion, hegemony, and U.S.-Latin American relations through the window of sport. My book, The Sovereign Colony: Olympic Sport, National Identity, and International Politics in Puerto Rico, studies the role that the Olympic movement played in Puerto Rican construction of national identity, in the development of an autonomist political culture, and in Puerto Rican agency in international politics. It was the recipient of the 2017 José Toribio Medina Award, from the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), the premier international association for Latin American librarians. My work appears in journals such as Journal of Sport HistoryCaribbean Studies, The Latin Americanist, The Americas, and The International Journal of the History of Sport. Currently, I am co-editor of Olimpismo The Olympic Movement in the Making of Latin America and the Caribbean (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2020). I am working on a book project on religion, imperialism, and sport through the YMCA in Puerto Rico and Cuba (1898-1950s). As a librarian, I direct the Latin American and Caribbean Studies collection at the University of Illinois. With close to one million volumes and numerous specialized databases, the collection is considered among the best in the nation. I oversee all aspects related to Latin America and the Caribbean at the University Library including collection development, reference, instruction, serial management, and offer specialized research consultations. My main interests at the library include in depth research consultations, collection development, and liaison work with the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies. I am the director of the Digital Library of Latin American and Caribbean Sport (DLLACS), and on the Conde de Montemar Letters, a portal that provides open access to a set of some 300 unique letters belonging to the family of the Count of Montemar between Lima and Madrid during the years of 1761 and 1799.

MemberFabian Steininger

…nischen Reich“. Moderne Stadtgeschichte 1 (2018): 53–67.

Edwards, Andrew, Fabian Steininger, and Andrea Giorgio Tosato: “The Era of Chinese Global Hegemony: Denaturalizing Money in the Early Modern World”. L’Atelier du Centre de recherches historiques. Revue électronique du CRH, Nr. 18/2018. Open …

I am a historian of the late Ottoman empire. My research explores the relationship between morality, emotions, and conceptions of the national community in the late 19th century.

MemberJonathan Valk

…Papers

Forthcoming. Crime and Punishment: Deportation in the Levant in the Age of Assyrian Hegemony. Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research.
Forthcoming. The Eagle and the Snake, or anzû and bašmu? Another Mythological Dimension in the Epic of Etana. Journal of the American Oriental Society.

University Lecturer in Assyriology at Leiden University specializing in the social and economic history of the Ancient Near East and in the theory of collective identity.

MemberHeather Heckman-McKenna

…“Women in Hysterics and Female Agency: Subverting Patriarchal Hegemony Through Performances of Femininity in Charlotte Smith’s Emmeline,” International Conference on Romanticism, forthcoming October 2018. Greenville, SC….

Heather Heckman-McKenna is an English Literature Ph.D. Candidate, Research Assistant, and Graduate Instructor at the University of Missouri. Her research interests include British Romanticism and the eighteenth-century, nineteenth-century American literature, and women writers of the period. To date, Heather is also a memoirist and creative nonfiction writer.