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MemberStacy Fahrenthold

Stacy Fahrenthold is a historian of the Middle East, with research specializations on modern Syria and Lebanon, migration, displacement, and the First World War in the Ottoman Empire. She is the author of Between the Ottomans and the Entente: the First World War in the Syrian and Lebanese Diaspora (OUP 2019) and several articles on transnational politics, borderlands, and Arabic-speaking migrants in the Americas. She received her Ph.D. from Northeastern University in 2014 and is currently Assistant Professor of migration history at University of California, Davis.

MemberSheila McManus

I am a Professor of History at the University of Lethbridge in southern Alberta. My research focuses on the borderlands of the North American West, and I am one of the co-editors of the H-Borderlands network. I teach the histories of the North American West, borderlands, historiography and methodology, and world history. In 2001-2002 I was the first Post-Doctoral Associate at the Howard Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders at Yale University. I taught American and Canadian history at the University of Winnipeg in 2002-03, before joining the U of L History Department in 2003.

MemberAlejandro L. Madrid

Alejandro L. Madrid is author or editor of books and edited volumes about the intersection of modernity, tradition, globalization, and ethnic identity in popular and art music, dance, and expressive culture of Mexico, the US-Mexico border, and the circum-Caribbean. Working at the intersection of musicology, ethnomusicology, and performance studies, Madrid’s work interrogates neoliberalism, globalization, and postmodernism while exploring questions of transnationalism, diaspora, and migration; homophobia and constructions of masculinity; embodied culture; and historiography, narrative, biography theory, and alternative ways of knowledge production in music and sound practices from the long twentieth century. In 2017, he was awarded the Dent Medal for “outstanding contributions to musicology” by the Royal Musical Association and the International Musicological Society. He is the only Ibero-American to have received this award since its inception in 1961. He is also the recipient of top prizes from the Latin American Studies Association, the American Musicological Society, the ASCAP Foundation Deems Taylor/Virgil Thomson Awards, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music-US Branch, and Casa de las Américas, among others, as well as fellowships and grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Ford Foundation, and the Fulbright Program. Madrid is currently professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at Cornell University’s Department of Music. He is the editor of the series Currents in Iberian and Latin American Music for Oxford University Press, and is regularly invited as guest professor at universities in Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, and Uruguay. Most recently, he served as music advisor to acclaimed director Peter Greenaway, whose latest film, Eisenstein in Guanajuato, is set in 1930s Mexico.

MemberFelipe Martinez-Pinzon

19th Century Latin American Literature, Latin American Studies, Latin American Literature (Literature), 19th Century Colombian History, Colombia, Maps and Society, Historical Geography, Tropical Ecology, Eco-criticism, War Theory, Naturaleza/cultura, Nature Culture, Costumbrismo Latinoamericano, 19th century culture and politics – Colombia & Latin America, 19th Century Latin American Art History, Modernismo, Spanish and Latin American Modernism, Spanish American Independence, Society and Politics 19th Century Latin America, Amazonia, Costumbrismo hispánico, and Historia política y social siglos XIX y XX

MemberRichard J. Callahan, Jr.

Material histories of religion, emphasizing the work of people in and on the world, stemming from American history and culture through the networks of resource extraction to oceanic spaces and the dark of coal mines. Comparative studies of religion and globalization embedded in those networks, influencing and influenced by the relentless frames of capitalism and “civilization.”