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MemberMatthew Scarborough

I was awarded my Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (UK) in March 2017 for a dissertation on the linguistic prehistory and historical dialectology of the Aeolic dialects of Ancient Greek. Since October 2015 I have been also collaborating as a research associate with the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (Jena, Germany) on a new database of Indo-European cognate relations. From Fall 2019 to April 2020 I was a sessional lecturer in Classics at MacEwan University (Edmonton, Canada). My research interests can be subdivided into a handful of related topics:

  • Greek language and linguistics (from Mycenaean to the modern spoken language)
  • Ancient Greek dialect studies (from both literary and sub-literary sources)
  • Ancient Greek epigraphy and papyrology
  • Indo-European comparative linguistics and philology (including comparative myth and poetics)
  • Homer and other Early Greek poetry
  • Etymology and the Indo-European lexicon
  • Language classification, cladistics, and subgrouping methodologies in historical linguistics

MemberAnnelies Cazemier

I am an ancient historian with a particular interest in the Greek world, Hellenistic history, and religion, as well as Greek history during the Roman period. Teaching in a History department at Southampton, I am also increasingly fascinated by the reception of the Greek world in later periods of history. My forthcoming book on Greek Sanctuaries and the Rise of Rome explores the spread of Roman power as seen from religious sites in Greece, the Aegean, and Asia Minor (from the third until the early first century BCE). It brings out the key role of cults and sanctuaries in early exchanges between Greeks, Romans, and Hellenistic rulers – in war, diplomacy, and trade. As part of my work for the Copenhagen Associations Project, I undertook research on ancient Greek associations, carrying out surveys and detailed studies of epigraphic evidence (esp. from the Aegean), and analysing religious aspects, foreign involvement, and relations with Rome. My ongoing research interests include the local histories and wider connections of islands in the Aegean from the fifth century BCE, through the Hellenistic age, into the Roman Imperial period; Greek sanctuaries and their networks; and travel and mobility in the ancient world.

MemberNatalia Elvira Astoreca

I’m a PhD student at the CREWS Project (Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems), where I’m developing my Thesis on the beginnings of Greek alphabetic writing. I’m particularly interested in the origin of the different local Greek alphabets with a multidisciplinar approach that brings together epigraphic, linguistic and contextual analysis of the written samples. My main research interests are Linguistics, Epigraphy, Greek dialectology and writing systems, especially ancient Mediterranean scripts. I wish to apply Digital Humanities to the study of these disciplines in the future.

MemberMekhola Gomes

I am a scholar of early South Asia. I am currently working on a book manuscript that traces the history of connections between writing, kinship, and  rule in early India  I am also working on a new project that compares discourses and practices of power across early India and Indonesia through the epigraphic record. My broader areas of interest include epigraphy, social history, feminist theory, and religion.

MemberAnna-Maria Sichani

Anna-Maria Sichani (Άννα-Μαρία Σιχάνη) is a Modern Greek literary scholar and a Digital Humanist. Anna-Maria is currently an Early Stage Researcher and Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow affiliated with the Digital Scholarly Editing Initial Training Network (DiXiT) (EU-FP7), based at Huygens ING and a PhD Research Fellow at King’s Digital Lab. Her PhD research – currently in the final stages at the University of Ioannina (Greece) – focuses on how changes on textual mediality and communication technologies informed while radicalised editorial practices and literary activities in the Modern Greek literary field during the Sixties. She holds a BA and a MPhil in Modern Greek Philology from the University of Athens (Greece), then followed by a MA in Digital Humanities in UCL, with a dissertation on literary drafts and computational technologies. Anna-Maria’s research interests, work experience and expertise intersect the changing materialities of literary culture, textual scholarship and scholarly communication with a particular focus on their related practices, politics and economics. She has collaborated with a number of Digital Humanities projects (Transcribe Bentham, DARIAH etc) and her skills include modelling, encoding and digital publication of textual materials, data architecture and analysis.

MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberMicheal Palmer

I am the owner of Greek-Language.com, GreekLinguistics.com, and HellenisticGreek.com. You can find my blog at GreekLanguage.blog. After a career teaching Ancient Greek (both Classical and Hellenistic) and Biblical Studies, I made a radical switch in 2006 taking me much more into the field of modern language acquisition. I now teach both Spanish and English in a dual language elementary school, and I will co-direct an academic-vocabulary development program to support bi-literacy this year (2018-19).

MemberAaron L. Beek

Aaron L. Beek is a philologist and historian with two primary research areas: ancient banditry/piracy and ancient North Africa.  More broadly, he works on a swath of Middle Republic and Hellenistic events, particularly as told and remembered by imperial-era writers centuries later.  Other research interests include Plautus, Latin Patristics (especially Tertullian), and Latin epigraphy (particularly epigraphy in North Africa). He has also worked on history pedagogy, digital humanities, and text analysis.