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MemberErin Walcek Averett

Erin Walcek Averett is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Creighton University and Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project on Cyprus. She earned her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology at the University of Missouri in the Department of Art History and Archaeology in 2007.  She specializes in early Greek art and archaeology and the archaeology of Cyprus, focusing on terracotta figurines in the Geometric and Archaic periods in the Eastern Mediterranean. Dr. Averett has traveled and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and was a fellow of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in Greece from 2002-2004.  Other areas of interest include Greek and Cypriot religion, points of contact between the Near East and the Aegean, gender in the ancient world, and digital archaeology.  She also serves as Adjunct Curator of Antiquities at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, NE.

MemberIoannis Georganas

Ioannis Georganas is Academic Director and Lecturer at Hellenic International Studies in the Arts. He holds an MA (1998) and a PhD (2003) in Archaeology from the University of Nottingham, and has worked for the British School at Athens, the Foundation of the Hellenic World, Lake Forest College, and the University of St Andrews. His research interests include the study of Early Iron Age burial customs and the construction of identities in Greece, as well as weapons and warfare in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Aegean. Ioannis has participated in excavations and field surveys in Greece (Kouphovouno, Lefkandi, Kastro-Kallithea, Praisos, Kenchreai) and Bulgaria (Halka Bunar). He served as President of the Athens-Greece Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (2005-2017) and he’s been Secretary of the Society of Ancient Military Historians (2013-present).

MemberSarah C. Murray

Sarah C. Murray is currently an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Toronto. She received a BA in Classical Archaeology from Dartmouth College in 2004 and a PhD in Classics from Stanford University in 2013. Her research interests include the development of Greek economic, cultural and ritual institutions between the end of the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age (ca. 1300–700 BCE), archaeological survey methods, and the use of quantitative evidence in archaeological research. She has conducted fieldwork at many sites throughout Greece, including the Bronze Age harbor site of Korfos-Kalamianos, the Mycenaean chamber tomb cemetery of Ayia Sotira, the transitional Bronze to Iron Age site on the islet of Mitrou, the Mesolithic site of Damnoni and cave art at Asphendou in southwestern Crete, and the agricultural landscape of the Mazi Plain. She is currently the co-director of the Bays of East Attica Regional Survey Project situated around the bay of Porto Rafti in eastern Attica (Greece). Her peer-reviewed publications include articles on women’s roles in ceramic production in the Early Iron Age Aegean and the LH IIIC cemetery of Perati in eastern Attica (in the American Journal of Archaeology, 2018, 2020) and the historiography of the Greek Dark Ages (in the journal Hesperia, 2018), and a monograph, The Collapse of the Mycenaean Economy: Trade, Imports, and Institutions, published by Cambridge University Press in 2017. She was born and raised in Marietta, Ohio, and was inducted into the Marietta High School Athletic Hall of Fame in 2018.

MemberMichael Anthony Fowler

Michael Anthony Fowler is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Department of Art and Design at East Tennessee State University (ETSU). An art historian and classical archaeologist, Prof. Fowler specializes in the art and material culture of ancient Greece and the Near East. His dissertation, “Human Sacrifice in Greek Antiquity: Between Myth, Image, and Reality,” offers an archaeologically and art historically grounded inquiry into the historicity, forms, and meanings of human sacrifice. The project combines several of Fowler’s research interests, particularly the iconography and archaeology of ritual and violence in the artistic imagination. Prof. Fowler most recently held the position of Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History (2018-2019) at ETSU. He has also taught as Visiting Lecturer at the University of Tübingen’s Institute for Classical Archaeology (2014) and as Art Humanities Instructor at Columbia (2013-2014; 2016-2017), where he earned the Preceptor Award for Excellence in Teaching for the Core Curriculum in 2014. Since 2015, Prof. Fowler has been an active member of the team excavating the sanctuary of Poseidon at Onchestos (Boeotia, Greece), and for the past four years has served on the excavation’s senior staff as Supervisor of Site B (the administrative center). In summer 2018 he joined the excavation and scientific team working at the sanctuary of Apollo on the Cycladic islet of Despotiko. Prof. Fowler is also co-author of the annual Chronique Archéologique de la Religion Grecque (Kernos), for which he is responsible for Central Greece. Prof. Fowler was educated at Columbia University (Ph.D., M.Phil., M.A.), Tufts University (M.A.), Harvard University (M.T.S.), and The Colorado College (B.A.). His research has been generously supported by the Alexander S. Onassis Foundation Foreigners’ Fellowship, the Teach@Tübingen program, an Alliance Doctoral Mobility grant, the Riggio Fellowships in Art History, and a C.V. Starr writing grant.

MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. Recently, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Michigan Society of Fellows and the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. At Texas Tech, she teaches undergraduate and masters courses in archaeology and classics and is also affiliated with the anthropology program.

MemberSamuel Dorf

Dr. Samuel N. Dorf is a musicologist and dance historian. He has published articles dealing with the performance and reinvention of ancient Greek music and dance in fin-de-siècle Paris, and queer music reception and has presented papers at history, queer studies, dance history, archaeology, and musicology conferences throughout North America and Europe. His research areas include intersections between musicology and dance studies and the history of technology, reception studies, queer studies, film studies, and the history of performance practice. His book, Performing Antiquity: Ancient Greek Music and Dance from Paris to Delphi, 1890-1930, is under contract with Oxford University Press.

MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.