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MemberNicholas Wagner

Nick is a PhD candidate in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities. He was an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin – Madison where he received a BA in Classics and Classical Humanities. His research interests include Greek and Roman historiography, Greek and Roman intellectual history, Roman political oratory, and Roman religion. He is writing his dissertation on the development of religious rhetoric in a number of Cicero’s from throughout his career. In particular, he is interested in tracking the rhetorical effects of Cicero’s religious language, such as the ways in which Cicero can use religion to denigrate his opponents or extol his allies, and how those rhetorical effect fit within the larger context of Roman identity in the late Republic.

MemberJulia Verkholantsev

I am a scholar of cultural, religious and intellectual history, early modern and medieval literary and linguistic culture. My publications and research are concerned with the cultural space of eastern, central, and southern Europe, particularly, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Bohemia, Poland, Croatia, Hungary, and Rus. In research and teaching, I deal with topics that include the history of and approaches to language, writing, and literacy; pre-modern historical writing and historical methods; Slavic (Cyrillic, Glagolitic, and Latin) and Greek paleography and cryptography; projects and theories of universal language; and Russian medieval and modern literature and culture. As a medievalist, I am convinced that the mapping of pre-modern Europe into the modern East – West divide creates unnecessary gaps between fields of knowledge that are inherently interconnected and impedes a dialogue between scholars who find themselves working in artificially bounded sub-disciplines. In my research and professional service I try to remedy this situation. In my teaching, I examine medieval literary and historical topics in the context of modern society and help students see their importance in the development of contemporary culture, politics, and social norms. I focus on the study of reading strategies of imaginative texts that leads to the advanced understanding of literature as part of cultural history.

MemberAnnelies Cazemier

I am an ancient historian with a particular interest in the Greek world, Hellenistic history, and religion, as well as Greek history during the Roman period. Teaching in a History department at Southampton, I am also increasingly fascinated by the reception of the Greek world in later periods of history. My forthcoming book on Greek Sanctuaries and the Rise of Rome explores the spread of Roman power as seen from religious sites in Greece, the Aegean, and Asia Minor (from the third until the early first century BCE). It brings out the key role of cults and sanctuaries in early exchanges between Greeks, Romans, and Hellenistic rulers – in war, diplomacy, and trade. As part of my work for the Copenhagen Associations Project, I undertook research on ancient Greek associations, carrying out surveys and detailed studies of epigraphic evidence (esp. from the Aegean), and analysing religious aspects, foreign involvement, and relations with Rome. My ongoing research interests include the local histories and wider connections of islands in the Aegean from the fifth century BCE, through the Hellenistic age, into the Roman Imperial period; Greek sanctuaries and their networks; and travel and mobility in the ancient world.

MemberAmy Coker

Amy Coker has over the last decade held positions in Classics and Ancient History in the UK at the Universities of Manchester, Liverpool and Bristol, including a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship (2013-2016) for a project on Greek sexual and scatological vocabulary and ancient offensive language. She is now an Honorary Research Fellow of the University of Bristol (2018-) and teacher of Classics at Cheltenham Ladies College (2018-). She has published work in the fields of historical linguistics, pragmatics and classics, most recently on the treatment of obscene language in the most well-known lexicon of Ancient Greek, Liddell and Scott, and on a filthy joke told by Cleopatra involving a ladle. She is a keen supporter of outreach and public engagement, and has worked with the UK charity Classics for All running projects to bring Latin and Greek teaching to schools which have no tradition of teaching these subjects. [May 2020: I’m in the process of uploading publications – email/message if you need anything (amy.coker [at] bristol.ac.uk)]

MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberNikos Pegioudis

Nikos Pegioudis is an art historian. He has received his PhD from the Department of History of Art at University College London (UCL) in 2015 with a dissertation titled ‘Artists and Radicalism in Germany, 1890-1933: Reform, Politics and the Paradoxes of the Avant-Garde’. In 2017-2018 he obtained a DAAD fellowship for a postodoctoral research project at the Freie Universität Berlin which was titled ‘Cultural Transfer in Architecture and Urban Planning: German Architecture and the Making of the Architect’s Profession in Greece, 1930-1950’. He has written various articles on the history of art, design and architecture in peer-reviewed academic journals and volumes. His main research interests are in German and Greek visual culture, architecture, the sociology of the avant-garde, politics of artistic professions, artistic labor and economic precarity.