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MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. Recently, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Michigan Society of Fellows and the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. At Texas Tech, she teaches undergraduate and masters courses in archaeology and classics and is also affiliated with the anthropology program.

MemberJeffrey A. Becker

Jeffrey Becker is a Mediterranean archaeologist. Becker has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The College of William & Mary, Boston University, McMaster University, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, and the University of Mississippi. Additionally, Becker served as Acting Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of the Pleiades Project and contributing editor for Etruscan and Roman art at Smarthistory.org. Becker is a veteran of archaeological fieldwork in Italy, notably on the Palatine Hill in Rome with Clementina Panella and the University of Michigan’s project at Gabii in Central Italy. He is currently a part-time lecturer in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at Binghamton University – SUNY. At Binghamton, he teaches courses in Mediterranean archaeology and Graeco-Roman art history.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.

MemberErin Walcek Averett

Erin Walcek Averett is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Creighton University and Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project on Cyprus. She earned her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology at the University of Missouri in the Department of Art History and Archaeology in 2007.  She specializes in early Greek art and archaeology and the archaeology of Cyprus, focusing on terracotta figurines in the Geometric and Archaic periods in the Eastern Mediterranean. Dr. Averett has traveled and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and was a fellow of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in Greece from 2002-2004.  Other areas of interest include Greek and Cypriot religion, points of contact between the Near East and the Aegean, gender in the ancient world, and digital archaeology.  She also serves as Adjunct Curator of Antiquities at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, NE.

MemberEvan Jewell

I am a Roman historian at Rutgers University – Camden (Assistant Professor of History). Prior to coming to Rutgers, I taught at Georgetown University (2019-20) and also spent a year long stint in Rome (2018-19). I received my Ph.D. from the interdepartmental Classical Studies graduate program at Columbia University in 2019, where I wrote a dissertation entitled, Youth and Power: Roman Performances of Age and Ageing from Plautus to Nero. My work examines Roman age and ageing and, in particular, the intersection of discourses about youth with the changing power relations at Rome from the birth of Plautus to the death of Nero. I am currently at work on my first monograph, based on the dissertation, which focuses on the period from 149 BCE to 68 CE. A second project, currently in its early stages, will look at non-elite spatial identities and modes of spatial perception in Roman urban contexts, as represented in both non-elite (primarily graffiti and inscriptions) and elite texts, as well as archaeological contexts and visual media.

I also have strong interests in: the ancient and contemporary history of displacement, migration, and refuge–among various other varieties of mobility;  Roman art history and archaeology; Latin epigraphy; Roman space; Roman gender and sexuality; Roman villa culture; Roman oratory and politics in the Republican period; Roman colonization; Roman slavery and freedpersons; comparative histories of slavery; Greek, Roman and modern historiography.