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MemberJeffrey Becker

Jeffrey Becker is a Mediterranean archaeologist. Becker has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The College of William & Mary, Boston University, McMaster University, the University of Mississippi, and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. Additionally, Becker served as Acting Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of the Pleiades Project and contributing editor for Etruscan and Roman art at Smarthistory.org. Becker is a veteran of archaeological fieldwork in Italy, notably on the Palatine Hill in Rome with Clementina Panella and the University of Michigan’s project at Gabii in Central Italy. He is currently a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at Binghamton University – SUNY. At Binghamton, he teaches courses in Mediterranean archaeology and Graeco-Roman art history.

DepositArt in the ancient Greek world

This course explores the art, archaeology, and culture of the Greek world from the prehistory to the Roman period. The course focuses on architecture, sculpture, painted pottery, and wall painting as its main object classes and situates artistic and stylistic developments within their social, political, and historical context. We will consider issues of style, regional developments, technique and craftsmanship, trade and economy, and art forms in various contexts. Although focused on art and archaeology, the course will also address key cultural topics including the household, funerary culture, gender, ritual, and economy. Among key sites to be studied are Knossos, Mycenae, Athens, Corinth, Vergina, Delphi, Poseidonia/Paestum, Cyrene, and Olympia.

MemberHenry Colburn

My research focuses on the art and archaeology of ancient Iran, and on the regions of the Near East, Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia that interacted with Iran prior to the advent of Islam. I am especially interested in reconstructing the social, cultural, political and even economic environments in which objects were created. I am also interested in how our modern knowledge of the ancient world was created, since this affects how we interpret objects and the conclusions we draw about the people who made them. I have held fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums and the Getty Research Institute, and teaching positions at the University of California, Irvine and the University of Southern California. I am now the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow in Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

MemberErin Averett

Erin Walcek Averett is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Creighton University and Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project on Cyprus. She earned her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology at the University of Missouri in the Department of Art History and Archaeology in 2007.  She specializes in early Greek art and archaeology and the archaeology of Cyprus, focusing on terracotta figurines in the Geometric and Archaic periods in the Eastern Mediterranean. Dr. Averett has traveled and excavated throughout the Mediterranean and was a fellow of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens in Greece from 2002-2004.  Other areas of interest include Greek and Cypriot religion, points of contact between the Near East and the Aegean, gender in the ancient world, and digital archaeology.  She also serves as Adjunct Curator of Antiquities at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, NE.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.