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MemberAna I Simón-Alegre

Nineteenth-century Iberian literatures and cultures (popular music, journalistic discourse, archival studies, and narratives of punishment, trauma and prison); Spanish realism and naturalism; Spanish women’s transnational literary and cultural networks; Slavery and antislavery in the Hispanic world; Gender, Sexualities and Women studies; Postcolonial studies; Global Hispanophone studies; Digital Humanities; Translation Studies & Activism; Visual and Written fiction narratives in the Hispanic Movies; Inclusive Language;

MemberNicole Marie Gervasio

Nicole Gervasio is a Ph.D. Candidate in English & Comparative Literature with a certificate in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Columbia University. Using postcolonial, feminist, and queer frameworks, her research explores collective trauma, genocide, political violence, human rights, and state repression in contemporary Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone literature from the Global South. Her dissertation, “Arts of the Impossible: Remembering Political Repression in Today’s Decolonial Literatures,” examines the innovative methods by which descendants and witnesses of genocide and dictatorship across the Global South have represented unimaginable political violence. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College with a B.A. in English and Growth & Structure of Cities and has received Beinecke, Javits, Mellon Mays, and Mellon Interdisciplinary Fellowships. A 2015-16 Public Humanities Fellow at Humanities New York, she is founder of the Kaleidoscope Project, a not-for-profit, diversity-based contemporary literature and creative writing workshop for teens in New York City.

MemberJennifer Wicke

19th, 20th, 21st century literatures; global studies; modernism and modernity studies; colonial/postcolonial/Empire studies; the novel; film, media, new media studies; critical and political theory; aesthetics and philosophy; queer and feminist theory; visual culture; the Global South; critical geography; Global Wests, American West; eco-critical studies and activism; precarity, labor, poverty, class; mass culture, TV studies; classics; the epic; Irish literature and culture; contemporary global fiction; science; mysticism.

MemberDaniel Hazard

I am a doctoral candidate in English at Princeton University. My research focuses on postcolonial studies, critical theory, and the literature of the plantation zones and diasporas of the Americas—especially Anglophone and Hispanophone Caribbean literature and African-American literature. I also have long-standing interests in U.S. Latina/o literature, twentieth-century Irish and British literature, and the history and theory of the novel. My dissertation project, “Freedom and Plantation Form,” examines how the plantation is figured as a space for freedom and self-making in Caribbean literature, film, and critical writing after 1945.