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MemberKirsty Millican

I completed my PhD from the University of Glasgow titled ‘Contextualising the Cropmark Record: The timber monuments of Neolithic Scotland’ in 2009. From 2009-10 I held a short-term lectureship at the University of of Aberdeen and from 2010 have worked for Historic Environment Scotland. I am currently Aerial Survey Projects Manager at Historic Environment Scotland and Affiliate Researcher (Archaeology) at the University of Glasgow. I am co-director of the Lochbrow Landscape Project, an archaeological survey project investigating the sites and landscapes at and around Lochbrow in Dumfries and Galloway. My research interests include the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland, timber monumentality and the use of wood to build monuments, aerial archaeology and the interpretation of cropmarks, relationships between humans and the environment in prehistory, landscape archaeology and the integration of experiential and GIS approaches. My publications cover themes of Neolithic Scotland, cropmark archaeology, experiential and landscape archaeology.

MemberJonathan Weiland

Jon’s research uses traditional classics scholarship, bioarchaeology and digital research methods, to investigate the darker aspects of the ancient world, topics like poverty, disease, slavery and violence.  His master’s thesis explored how malaria affected the landscapes of Roman Italy.  His dissertation focuses on the archaeology of what some refer to as the “Invisible Romans,” the people with the lowest socio-economic status in Italy, such as slaves and peasants.  His other projects include developing effective low-cost 3D modeling techniques for documenting archaeological evidence and using GIS to model ancient travel and exchange. Jon has worked for the Midwest Archaeological Center of the National Park Service, the Archaeological Mapping Lab at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and in Archaeological Collections at the Arizona State Museum.  He has participated in archaeological investigations in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Mexico, Peru, and at several locations in the United States. In his free time Jon enjoys travel, photography, rambling conversation, excessively long walks and binge watching good TV.

MemberPaul Reilly

Currently, Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Archaeological Computing Research Group at the University of Southampton, where I focus on two main areas of research: ontological transformations of archaeology in the digital, especially due to the developing alignments between virtual and physical words; exploring the significance of craft skills in field archaeology, which involves extensive cross-disciplinary collaboration with fine artists.I am a pioneer of data visualisation and virtual heritage. My involvement in archaeological computing began in 1982 while working on my PhD in which I developed and applied proto-GIS technology to the analysis of the archaeological landscape of the Isle of Man. My fascination with the potential and pitfalls of digital technologies to model, explore, present, translate, transform and re-present archaeological data and interpretation has expanded ever since. Now my peer-reviewed research output investigates the implications of additive manufacturing and their affordances for contemporary archaeology (see ORCID account: orcid.org/0000-0002-8067-8991).I am a past chairman and now life member of CAA (Computer Applications in Archaeology), Chairman of the CAA International Scientific Committee, a member of Virtual Heritage Network Ireland, CAA-Greece and the editorial board of Virtual Archaeology (virtualarchaeology.ru)In addition to my academic credentials I bring more than 23 years of wide international business experience in the IT and communications sector (with IBM) where I was worldwide leader for Knowledge brokering, professional and community development and complex solution deployment for the Telecommunications Industry business unit. I have also held leadership roles for strategy development, marketing, sales and research and development (where I was the industry leadership team interface to IBM Research Division). Previous to IBM I was a research fellow and free-lance field archaeologist working in UK, Germany, Austria, and Spain and pioneer of data visualisation techniques in archaeology.

MemberPatricia Murrieta-Flores

I’m the Director of the Digital Humanities Research Centre based at the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Chester. I’m also ERC Senior Researcher at the ‘Past in its Place Project’ (2014-2016) and Lecturer in Digital Humanities (from 2017). I’m part of the team of the HERA ‘Deepdead Project’ (2016-2019), a collaborator in the ‘Spatial Humanities Project’ at Lancaster University, and the European Cost Action ‘Reassembling the Republic of Letters’. My interest lies in the application of technologies for Humanities and her primary area of research is the Spatial Humanities and the investigation of different aspects of space, place and time using a range of technologies including GIS and Corpus Linguistic approaches. See some of my publications here: Patricia Murrieta-Flores in Academia.

MemberBébio Vieira Amaro

Bébio Amaro is a Doctor of Engineering from the University of Tokyo, specializing in the architectural, urban and territorial history of East Asian port towns during the 16th and 17th centuries. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor at the School of Engineering in Tianjin University, and also serves as Assistant Director of the International Research Centre for Chinese Cultural Heritage Conservation (IRC/CCHC) at the same university.   His current research focus is to apply methodologies from the fields of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing, Environmental Sciences, Archaeology and Archaeogeography to digitally reconstruct pre-modern landscapes, and analyze the urbanization process of port cities such as Tianjin over very long time spans (100-400 years). Furthermore, he is an avid proponent of building bridges between the worlds of Humanities and Natural Sciences, as it is impossible to properly understand urban development, urban morphology and built heritage without taking into account the cultural viewpoints of various social groups at different time periods. To this end, he encourages students to broaden their horizons, and consider emotional, ritual/religious, artistic/symbolic and environmental perspectives when studying the urban and non-urban landscape.   His perspectives on building and landscape morphology are informed by the work of theorists such as Bruno Latour, Tim Ingold and Gérard Chouquer, arguing that landscapes are generated by long and complex processes that involve both humans and non-humans (ex: diseases, animals, natural disasters, geomorphological processes, etc.). It is these complex, self-organized and non-linear processes that over long periods of time gradually give birth to elements of heritage and memory.

MemberRebecca Seifried

I am the Geospatial Information Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries, and I have a background in anthropological archaeology. My current role is to help folks at UMass learn about GIS and use different geospatial resources in their research and teaching. My research focuses on the interaction between marginal, rural regions and expanding empires in the medieval and post-medieval Mani peninsula, Greece, using a combination of archaeological data, archival sources, and remotely-sensed imagery analysis.

MemberKatrina Grant

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently a lecturer at the Australian National University in the Centre for Digital HUmanities Research. She is also in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas.