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MemberAraby Smyth

I am a PhD candidate and instructor in the Department of Geography at the University of Kentucky. Before moving to Lexington I lived in Brooklyn and attended Hunter College of the City University of New York. In NYC I was an activist on several fronts, organizing mass demonstrations and creative actions that were a part of the anti-globalization, anti-war, and immigrant rights movements. While studying at Hunter I was an intern at the Center for Migration Studies and the NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs. I also worked as a research assistant in the GIS lab at Baruch College and for the project Mapping the Solidarity Economy.

MemberWilliam Farrell

I am a librarian at the University of Leicester supporting research in the humanities and social sciences. I develop open access publishing services and collections, including:

I also have an interest in digital humanities and historical GIS. My open Zotero group for History and GIS can be found here. I trained as a historian and work on the economy and society of eighteenth-century Britain. My PhD was a study of the silk industry in London, and I have published on smuggling and the fiscal state. With Tim Reinke-Williams (Northampton) I am working on a study of apprentice migration from Wales, Scotland and Ireland to early modern London. I am book reviews editor of Local Population Studies and a committee member of CILIP Local Studies Group.

MemberVicki Mayer

I am a professor of communication and media with a special focus on media and cultural production: personal, industrial, as well as geographies and political economies of production. Methodologically, I tend to use a combination of ethnography, participant observation, action research, textual and archival research, GIS mapping, and design thinking to answer research questions about how and why different kinds of folks value media production in relation to social forces in their geographic and political-economic milieus.

MemberSusan Grunewald

I am a Ph.D. candidate in History at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. My dissertation examines German prisoners of war in the Soviet Union from 1941-1956. I am interested in how they were treated, why they were held for so long, and their role in the Soviet forced labor economy. To access their labor contribution, I digitally map the camp locations with regards to resources and infrastructure developments with the program ArcGIS. The role of the POWs in the early stages of the Cold War is also a major part of my research.

MemberJonathan Weiland

Jon’s research uses traditional classics scholarship, bioarchaeology and digital research methods, to investigate the darker aspects of the ancient world, topics like poverty, disease, slavery and violence.  His master’s thesis explored how malaria affected the landscapes of Roman Italy.  His dissertation focuses on the archaeology of what some refer to as the “Invisible Romans,” the people with the lowest socio-economic status in Italy, such as slaves and peasants.  His other projects include developing effective low-cost 3D modeling techniques for documenting archaeological evidence and using GIS to model ancient travel and exchange. Jon has worked for the Midwest Archaeological Center of the National Park Service, the Archaeological Mapping Lab at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and in Archaeological Collections at the Arizona State Museum.  He has participated in archaeological investigations in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Mexico, Peru, and at several locations in the United States. In his free time Jon enjoys travel, photography, rambling conversation, excessively long walks and binge watching good TV.

MemberJames Green

I have been a working archaeologist for almost 30 years in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic United States. I am experienced with all aspects of terrestrial archaeological survey, site testing, site mitigation, artifact analysis, curation, data management, historic and archival research, and report writing. I have supervised hundreds of Phase I site delineations and have crewed or supervised numerous Phase II and III prehistoric and historic site investigations. I have taught prehistoric lithic and ceramic analysis, as well as historic artifact analysis to up to 8 individuals at the corporate level. I have given knapping and prehistoric pottery making demonstrations, as well as reproducing prehistoric vessels for museums and corporate culture. I am a GIS professional who uses aerial imagery and LiDAR to analyze the terrain on a regular basis. Additionally, I have spent almost 20 years processing and analyzing offshore geophysical data.

MemberCarolyn Vieira-Martinez

Carolyn Vieira-Martinez completed her PhD at UCLA and was the specialist in Central African History and African Languages at Chapman University until 2015. Her dissertation entitled “Building Kimbundu” combined historical linguistics methodology with GIS technology to study gender, power, and the construction of community through language in 16th century Angola. She has taught computer mediated instruction methods and qualitative data analysis at many universities including the University of San Diego and UT Houston. Her ASILI© African Scholarly Integrated Language Inquiry database system is used by scholars to facilitate the use of Bantu languages as evidence for social history. She speaks unapologetically from a personal Chicana history grounded in Detroit and Los Angeles, pushes the boundaries in developing new technological research methods, and is passionately analytical, theoretical, and collaborative.

MemberPatricia Murrieta-Flores

…-Flores, P., Donaldson, C., and Gregory, I. (2017-In Press) GIS and Literary History: Advancing Digital Humanities Resea…

I’m the Director of the Digital Humanities Research Centre based at the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Chester. I’m also ERC Senior Researcher at the ‘Past in its Place Project’ (2014-2016) and Lecturer in Digital Humanities (from 2017). I’m part of the team of the HERA ‘Deepdead Project’ (2016-2019), a collaborator in the ‘Spatial Humanities Project’ at Lancaster University, and the European Cost Action ‘Reassembling the Republic of Letters’. My interest lies in the application of technologies for Humanities and her primary area of research is the Spatial Humanities and the investigation of different aspects of space, place and time using a range of technologies including GIS and Corpus Linguistic approaches. See some of my publications here: Patricia Murrieta-Flores in Academia.