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MemberAlexander Meshcheryakov

Alexander Meshcheryakov is a Russian historian at the Astrakhan State University who studies the history of the border relations between China and Russia. He studies the processes of cross-border interactions, cultural hybridization and Frontier in the Far East. He pays special attention to the relations between Chinese and Russian ethnic groups during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His another topic of research, based on the archive documents is an early history of grape growing and winemaking in Imperial Russia, bioprospecting of Imperial Russia, as well as of the formation of the Russian border in the Caspian Region.

MemberAdam Cook

Adam has always had a keen interest in medieval history, particularly borderlands and frontiers. He completed both a BA and MRes in History at the University of Hull in 2017 and 2018 respectively. Adam’s PhD research focuses on identity in Yorkshire and Northumberland between 1066 and 1216, using baronial families as a lens through which to examine the distinct political, social, cultural and religious characteristics of these regions. The project is funded by NECAH under the supervision of Dr Colin Veach at the University of Hull and Dr Katherine Lewis at the University of Huddersfield.

MemberJohn Edward Martin

…Digital Frontiers 2018 #DF18KU

“Monstrosity and the Topography of Fear“, Society for Comparative Literature and the Arts Conference, 2018

Realizing Resistance 2019  #RESIST19UNT…

I am a scholarly communication librarian and a collection development liaison for the departments of English, Communication Studies, and Technical Communication at the University of North Texas Libraries.  I work on scholarly publishing, scholarly impact, open access, open textbooks, journal hosting, information literacy, and digital scholarship initiatives.  I also hold a doctorate in American literature and have scholarly interests in American Romanticism, gothic & horror fiction and film, poetry, religion & literature, comics studies, and literary pedagogy. I’ve published scholarly work on Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickinson, H.P. Lovecraft, and the pedagogy of horror, as well as other professional writing on scholarly communication, information literacy, and comics studies. I also serve on the Board of Directors for Digital Frontiers, a community of makers and users of digital resources for the humanities.

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberYasmine Beale-Rivaya

My research centers on language contact, change, and borrowing in borderland communities. My main area of focus is evidence and practices of language contact and the contexts of the language practices between Romance and Semitic languages among medieval Iberian communities, especially the Mozarabic (Arabized-Christians) communities, Mudéjars, and Moriscos, living between the Andalusí and Christian frontier from the ninth to the early fourteenth century in Medieval Iberia. I maintain a parallel line of research where I study contact between Spanish and English, and Spanish and Indigenous Languages along borderland areas of the United States and Mexico.

MemberJoanna Gardner-Huggett

Joanna Gardner-Huggett is an Associate Professor and Associate Dean at DePaul University where she teaches courses on twentieth-century art and feminist theory. Gardner-Huggett’s research focuses on the intersection between feminism and arts activism and has been published in the journals British Art Journal, Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies, Historical Geography, and Woman’s Art Journal. Her most recent scholarship explores the history of the painter Julia Thecla (1896-1973), the Guerrilla Girls, the Feminist Art Workers, and the origins of the women artists’ cooperatives Artemisia Gallery in Chicago (1973-2003) and ARC (1973-present). 

MemberSheila McManus

I am a Professor of History at the University of Lethbridge in southern Alberta. My research focuses on the borderlands of the North American West, and I am one of the co-editors of the H-Borderlands network. I teach the histories of the North American West, borderlands, historiography and methodology, and world history. In 2001-2002 I was the first Post-Doctoral Associate at the Howard Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders at Yale University. I taught American and Canadian history at the University of Winnipeg in 2002-03, before joining the U of L History Department in 2003.

MemberBill Pascoe

Bill Pascoe is a Digital Humanities specialist and is currently the System Architect on Time Layered Cultural Map, a national digital humanities mapping infrastructure project. He has worked with the Centre For 21st Century Humanities and the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing at the University of Newcastle, Australia (Awabakal). He has been a leader and contributor in innovative and high impact DH and eResearch projects, including the Colonial Frontier Massacres project, the EMWRN archive, ELDTA endangered languages, IA stylometry software, Virtual Biobank 3D medical image processing and eWater. He has software development experience across finance, water engineering, science, health and humanities and an education in English, creative writing, semiotics and philosophy.