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MemberImani Mosley

Imani Mosley is currently a PhD candidate in Musicology at Duke University. After receiving two Masters degrees from Peabody (Bassoon Performance/Musicology), she began PhD work at Columbia where she received a Master of Arts in Musicology before attending Duke. She is currently writing her dissertation entitled “‘The queer things he said’: British Identity, Social History, and Press Reception of Benjamin Britten’s Postwar Operas.” In addition to her work on Britten, she also specializes in contemporary opera, feminist and queer theory, reception history, and British and American music from 1890 to 1945. She is currently the Harsha Murthy Fellow in Digital Scholarship (Duke University Libraries) where she creates and curates projects and events in the digital humanities. She has presented papers throughout the United States and the United Kingdom.

MemberMarian Wilson Kimber

  Marian Wilson Kimber is Professor of Musicology at the University of Iowa.  Her research about Felix Mendelssohn and Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel has appeared in numerous books and journals.  Wilson Kimber’s 2017 book, The Elocutionists: Women, Music, and the Spoken Word, published by the University of Illinois Press, explores women’s roles as performers and composers in the intersection of poetic recitation and music in American cultural life. The book is the recipient of the H. Earle Johnson Publication Subvention from the Society for American Music and an additional subvention from the American Musicological Society.  Wilson Kimber has recently taken up performing the women’s spoken-word compositions she writes about with pianist Natalie Landowski.  

MemberDanielle Sofer

Danielle Sofer (she/her/they/them) has been a lecturer at Maynooth University since 2016. A music theorist attuned to gendered hearings and sensitive to cultural context, Dr. Sofer has published on music by Elizabeth Maconchy, Juliana Hodkinson, Alice Shields, Donna Summer, and Barry Truax and on the reception of Adorno’s ‘listening typology’. She completed a PhD with distinction at the Kunstuniversität Graz with the dissertation, “Making Sex Sound: Erotic Currents in Electronic Music.” Her volume Elizabeth Maconchy: Music as Impassioned Argument (Universal Edition, 2018), edited with Christa Brüstle, features contributions from the composer’s two daughters, family photos, and a complete list of the composer’s works presented for the first time. Recent articles include an analysis of gender and sexuality in music by Barry Truax (Organised Sound, 2018), and ‘Breaking Silence, Breaching Censorship: “Ongoing Interculturality’” in Alice Shields’s Electronic Opera Apocalypse’, forthcoming in American Music journal, awarded subventions from the Society for Music Theory and the American Musicological Society’s AMS 75 Publication Awards for Young Scholars Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Danielle graduated summa cum laude from the State University of New York at New Paltz with a BA in music performance (viola and piano) and honours. She holds Master’s degrees from Binghamton University (New York) in piano performance and Stony Brook University (New York) in music history and theory, with a thesis on Prokofiev’s opera The Gambler, a project that brought her to St. Petersburg, Russia as an Erasmus student. Prior to joining the faculty of the Institute for Musical Criticism and Aesthetical Research at the Kunstuniversität Graz, Danielle studied music theory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she was an assistant to Brian Hyer. She has presented on sexuality and electronic music on several occasions, including conferences of the International Computer Music Association, The Society for Music Theory, The Society for Musicology in Ireland, and the Feminist Theory and Music conference. As a violist, pianist, and singer, Danielle has performed in New York City, Boston, San Francisco, Graz, Haifa, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and many smaller cities around the globe. http://daniellessofer.wixsite.com/daniellesofer  

MemberMorgan Rich

Morgan Rich is a Volkswagen Stiftung and the Andrew Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities, working at the Staatliches Institut für Musikforschung, Berlin. She received her PhD in musicology from the University of Florida. Her dissertation reassesses Theodor Adorno’s relationship with Alban Berg in a pivotal moment in his philosophical and compositional career. During the 2016/2017 academic year she was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Musicology at the University of Florida School of Music. She has presented at the Annual Meetings of the American Musicological Society, International Council of Europeanists, German Studies Association, Austrian Studies Association  as well as various national and international conferences for musicology and European studies.