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MemberKaja Marczewska

I am a Research Fellow at the Centre for Postdigital Cultures and a member of Information as Material  editorial collective. Before joining Coventry in 2018, I was a Lecturer in English and Visual Culture at the University of Westminster. I completed my PhD at the Department of English Studies, Durham University, supervised by Professor Patricia Waugh and funded by the Von Huegel fellowship and the Durham Doctoral Studentship. I was an Eccles Centre Fellow in American Studies at the British Library in 2014 and a visiting researcher at Dartmouth College, USA in April 2015. In 2018, I will be a Reese Fellow for American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas and a visiting reseracher at the Getty Research Institute library.   My research is positioned at the intersection of cultural studies, publishing, and art history and theory. My interests include experimental and independent publishing, artists’ books, print cultures, economies of cultural production, artists’ collectives and forms of self-organisation, experimental art and writing, as well as intersections of humanities, technology and law.   I have recently completed my fist book – The is not a copy: writing at the Iterative Turn (Bloomsbury Academic 2018) – which investigates the implications of the propensity to copy as a creative practice in contemporary culture. In this project, I explore contemporary approaches to cultural production as a manifestation of what I call the Iterative Turn in order to re-think copying in art and writing as a critical praxis.   My current research builds on ideas explored in my monograph and interrogates diverse developments triggered by or related to The Iterative Turn, including the emergence of curatorial culture as a dominant contemporary model of cultural production, practices of re-performance and re-staging exhibitions, and contemporary uses of appropriation in digital media, film, and photography. These interests are related to my ongoing project – Appropriation Now – exploring the history of appropriation art from 1970s to the present.   My second monograph, in progress, focuses on self-publishing as an artistic strategy from 1960s onwards. The project explores transformations of reproduction technologies as they impact on production and distribution models of art and writing in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The project explores diverse forms of self-publishing  – from artists’ books, through ephemera, zines and photo-books, to contemporary forms of post-digital print – to ask questions about changing economies of cultural production. In the book, I focus in particular on exploring the role of self-publishing as a tool of self-organisation and collectivism and the role of DIY practices in the field of cultural production.   I have a long-standing interest in hybrid creative-critical forms and in alternative forms of making research public. In 2015/16, I curated a series of events at Carroll/Fletcher gallery in London showcasing contemporary experimental writing practices and interrogating ideas of experimentation in the arts today. I was also the organiser of the UK premiere of Mark Amerika’s Immobilité, an experimental mobile phone film, which was shown in May 2016 at the Regent Street cinema in London, and a curator of Forms of Criticism symposium at Parasol Unit, London in June 2016. The latter brought together artists, curators, critics, writers and academics engaging in hybrid creative-critical practices.

DepositContemporary Literature from Singapore

Literature in Singapore is written in the country’s four official languages: Chinese, English, Malay, and Tamil. Since 1999, with the state’s implementation of the Renaissance City Plan to revitalize arts and culture in Singapore, there have been various initiatives to increase the visibility of contemporary Singaporean writing both within the country itself and on an international scale. Translation plays a key role in bridging the linguistic and literary divides wrought by the state’s mother tongue policies, with several works by Cultural Medallion winners in different languages translated into English, which remains at present the shared language in Singapore. Literary anthologies are also invaluable forms through which the concepts of a national literature and national identity are expressed and negotiated. Writings about gender and sexuality have also become more prominent in single-author collections or edited anthologies, with writers exploring various inventive and experimental narrative forms. A number of poets and writers are also established playwrights, and theater has historically been and continues to be an extremely vital form of creative expression and cultural production. Graphic novels, crime and noir fiction, and speculative and science fiction publications are also on the rise, with the awarding of the Singapore Literature Prize to Sonny Liew’s The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye signaling that these genres merit serious literary consideration.

MemberElina Siltanen

My work focuses on contemporary American experimental poetry. My current research project is about reading experimental US poetry with a focus on emotion. I have been writing, for instance, about conceptual and post-conceptual poetry with reference to emotion. My book, Experimentalism as Reciprocal Communication in Contemporary American Poetry: John Ashbery, Lyn Hejinian, Ron Silliman came out from John Benjamins in 2016. The book presents a way of reading these poets’ work as reciprocal communication, where meaning-making happens in the community of readers, writers, and texts. Published in the FILLM Studies in Languages and Literatures series, the book is aimed at a double audience: those who are experts in contemporary poetry but also for others scholars and students who may not know about experimental poetry but are nevertheless interested in findings in the field.

DepositSometimes, I just want to draw…

This is the presentation of a conference paper at the Theoretical Archaeology Group conference 2018 (Chester). The conveners of the conference session ‘Practising Creativity: Experimentation, Mistakes and Successes in Art-Archaeology’, James Dixon and Seren Griffiths, ask participants to discuss experimentation in art-archaeology. Artists have been inspired by archaeology, and archaeologists by art: but what about the realities of creative practice in archaeology, warts and all? My paper introduces my use of archaeological comics during my PhD research, relating some of the successes and failures, and where I think this might go next. The presentation text accompanying each slide is available in the notes sections. You can also see my visual abstract for this paper in CORE.

Deposit“Sometimes, I just want to draw…”

This is a visual abstract for a conference paper at the Theoretical Archaeology Group conference 2018 (Chester). The conveners of the conference session ‘Practising Creativity: Experimentation, Mistakes and Successes in Art-Archaeology’, James Dixon and Seren Griffiths, ask participants to discuss experimentation in art-archaeology. Artists have been inspired by archaeology, and archaeologists by art: but what about the realities of creative practice in archaeology, warts and all? My paper introduces my use of archaeological comics during my PhD research, relating some of the successes and failures, and where I think this might go next.

MemberAnne Swartz

I lecture and write on various topics in contemporary art, including intermedia art, theory and criticism, and women artists.  I currently write about new media/new genre art, the home, and contemporary American feminist art.  I particularly focus on Pattern and Decoration, an American art movement of the 1970s-1980s.  I teach via eLearning for my college.