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MemberKeith Pluymers

…American Society for Environmental History

North American Conference for British Studies

American Historical Association…
…l history not published in Agricultural History.

“‘Pirates’ and the Problems of Plantation in Seventeenth-Century Ireland,” in Governing the Sea in the Early Modern Era: Essays in Honor of Robert C. Ritchie, edited by Peter C. Mancall and Carole Shammas, (San Marino, CA: Huntington Library Press, 2015), pgs. 79-108.

“Taming the Wilderness in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Ireland and Virginia,” Environmental History (October 2011) 16 (4): pgs. 610-632….

I’m an early modern environmental historian researching wood scarcity in 16th and 17th century England and how these fears shaped colonial expansion into the Atlantic World. I teach broad courses on environmental history that mix broad geographic and chronological frameworks with case studies. I’ve taught courses on early modern conservation and sustainability, rivers and human history from the Ancient world to Los Angeles, and doing history in the Anthropocene in addition to introductory courses to early modern Atlantic and American environmental history.

MemberWilko Graf von Hardenberg

My main disciplinary affiliation is environmental history, but I could also be termed a social historian, a historical geographer, or a digital humanist. My most recent research activities focus on the social history of the environment and on the history of science. In particular, I look at conflicts about rights to access resources, the history of nature conservation, and the development of the concept of mean sea level.

MemberGerman Pallares

German is a PhD Candidate at the Stuart Weitzman school of Design interested in the history of modern architecture in Latin America and the United States with a focus on cultural relations, borders and politics. His work is interdisciplinary, drawing on fields such as Border and Chicano Studies, Environmental History, and Urbanism, and explores Post-colonial and De-colonial concepts that refine understandings of territories, nations, and migration as they relate to architectural and urban conditions. German has taught History & Theory courses in Mexico and the U.S.

MemberJason W. Moore

Jason W. Moore is an environmental historian and historical geographer at Binghamton University, where he is professor of sociology. He is author or editor, most recently, of Capitalism in the Web of Life (Verso, 2015), Capitalocene o Antropocene? (Ombre Corte, 2017), Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism (PM Press, 2016), and, with Raj Patel, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things(University of California Press, 2017). His books and essays on environmental history, capitalism, and social theory have been widely recognized, including the Alice Hamilton Prize of the American Society for Environmental History (2003), the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the Section on the Political Economy of the World-System (American Sociological Association, 2002 for articles, and 2015 for Web of Life), and the Byres and Bernstein Prize in Agrarian Change (2011). He coordinates the World-Ecology Research Network.

MemberKaren Schamberger

Karen Schamberger is a curator and historian with a love of museums and public history. She is currently working at the National Museum of Australia as part of a team developing a new environmental history gallery. She has  previously worked on the Identity: Yours, Mine, Ours exhibition (2011) at the Immigration Museum and Journeys exhibition (2009) at the National Museum of Australia. Her PhD dissertation: Identity, belonging and cultural diversity in Australian Museums examined the ways that objects mediate relations between people of culturally diverse backgrounds in Australian society and history. This included an examination of the ways that museums, through their collections and exhibitions, are implicated in processes of inclusion and exclusion. Her interests include museology, transnationalism, migration, histories of place, colonisation, whiteness, human relationships with other species and material culture.

MemberHeidi Dodson

Heidi Dodson is a postdoctoral fellow in the Humanities in the World initiative at the Penn State Humanities Institute. She is a historian who specialized in twentieth-century African American history. Her research interests include community building, social movements, race and landscape, public and digital history, and environmental history. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has an MLIS from the University of Texas at Austin. Heidi is currently working on a book manuscript based on her dissertation, titled “We Cleared the Land with Our Hands”: Claiming Black Community Space in the Missouri Delta. Her work interrogates the intersections of rural migration, activism, and place in the Border South. Heidi most recently held positions as the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Scholarship at the University at Buffalo (2018-2019) and Oral History Scholar-in-Residence at the Marian Cheek Jackson Center in Chapel Hill, NC (2017-2018).

MemberJim Clifford

Jim Clifford is an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of Saskatchewan. He researches environmental and urban historian of Britain and the British World during the long nineteenth century. Using digital methods including historical GIS and text mining, he explores the industrialization in Greater London and global commodities. He is currently focused on ecological limits to industrial growth and how British industry came to rely on overseas “ghost acres” to maintain growth during the nineteenth century. Book: Jim Clifford, West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshland, 1839-1914Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017. Reviews: