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MemberGenevieve Creedon

My research focuses on the ways in which narratives and discursive practices frame landscapes and shape human interactions with environments. I am interested in how individuals, institutions, and corporations use and participate in stories that foster affective connections to local, national, and international landscapes. As a comparative literature scholar working in the Environmental Humanities, with strong backgrounds in American Studies, Cultural Studies, and Animal Studies, I have focused my work on the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States, while drawing on transnational histories, currents, and influences. This has allowed me to integrate my interests in environmental studies and narrative studies with my training as a creative writer in developing an inter-disciplinary comparative framework for examining how narrative and rhetorical practices structure our experiences of nature.

MemberFranklin Ridgway

American Literature, Marxism, American Studies, Travel Writing, Built Environment, American Culture, Nineteenth Century Studies, Sociotechnical Systems, Enviromental Humanities, Literary Geography, Nineteenth Century United States, Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Literary Regionalism, American Realism and Naturalism, American Realism, Media History, Lacanian theory, U.S. Intellectual History, Spectatorship, American Immigrant Narratives, Phenomenology of Space and Place, Science and technology studies, Environmental Humanities, and Twentieth Century Literature

MemberKeith Pluymers

I’m an early modern environmental historian researching wood scarcity in 16th and 17th century England and how these fears shaped colonial expansion into the Atlantic World. I teach broad courses on environmental history that mix broad geographic and chronological frameworks with case studies. I’ve taught courses on early modern conservation and sustainability, rivers and human history from the Ancient world to Los Angeles, and doing history in the Anthropocene in addition to introductory courses to early modern Atlantic and American environmental history.

MemberWilko Graf von Hardenberg

My main disciplinary affiliation is environmental history, but I could also be termed a social historian, a historical geographer, or a digital humanist. My most recent research activities focus on the social history of the environment and on the history of science. In particular, I look at conflicts about rights to access resources, the history of nature conservation, and the development of the concept of mean sea level.