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MemberMatthias Wong

Early modern British history, PhD student at the University of Cambridge. Working on the regicide of Charles I, conceptions of time and the future, and their relation to trauma and temporal narratives in the English Civil War. Particular emphasis on astrologers, historians, utopian writers, and Baconian scientists of the Stuart and Interregnum periods.

MemberAnne Donlon

I am project manager for Humanities Commons and other digital initiatives at the Modern Language Association. Previously, I was a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Postdoctoral Fellow at Emory University, a position that was shared between the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives & Rare Book Library and the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship. I am a member of the Journal for Interactive Technology & Pedagogy editorial collective. In addition to my interest in the intersections between libraries, archives, and digital humanities, I research and write about African American culture and the Spanish Civil War.

MemberSarah Beetham

Dr. Sarah Beetham is an assistant professor of art history at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, specializing in American art and particularly the monuments erected to citizen soldiers after the Civil War. She holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in art history from the University of Delaware and a B.A. in art history and English from Rutgers University. Her current book project, Monumental Crisis: Accident, Vandalism, and the Civil War Citizen Soldier, focuses on the ways in which post-Civil War soldier monuments have served as flashpoints for heated discussion of American life and culture in the 150 years since the end of the war. Dr. Beetham has published work on Civil War monuments and art history pedagogy in Public Art Dialogue, Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art, Nierika: Revista de Estudios de Arte, and Common-Place. She has been interviewed regarding her work on Civil War monuments and the current debate over the future of Confederate monuments in several outlets, including the Washington Post, U.S. News and World Report, Architectural Digest, and Mic.

MemberKathleen Brown

Kathleen Brown is an incoming doctoral student in American Culture at the University fo Michigan. She recently finished a master’s degree in English Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. Her thesis, “The ‘Abnormal’ and ‘Unreal’: Examining the Premature Death of Muriel Rukeyser’s Savage Coast,” seeks to understand why Rukeyser’s Spanish Civil War account, based on her lived experience, was labeled as unreal by her publisher and summarily rejected. Her research interests include lost and found radicalism, historical memory, and women and writers of color in the antifascist movement. She is particularly interested in the writers at the margins of the Spanish Civil War and the transnational networks that sustained them.

MemberJesse Alemán

Jesse Alemán is a professor of English and the Director of Literature at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches nineteenth-century American and U.S. Latina/o literary and cultural histories. He also offers classes on the C19 American gothic; southwestern literature and film; and Chicana/o horror. He holds the title of Presidential Teaching Fellow, a distinction awarded for his critical pedagogy at a Hispanic Serving Institution.

MemberRyleigh Adams

I am a PhD Candidate in Classics at the University of Tasmania studying Roman provincial management. I finished my Bachelor of Arts in 2015, graduating with a double major in Classics and History, and a minor in English. In 2016, I completed my Honours thesis “Cicero and the Governors: Perceptions of Provincial Management in the Late Republic” and was awarded First Class Honours. My research interests include Roman Imperialism, Roman provincial management, and emotions in antiquity. I am particularly interested in uncovering the perspective of provincials brought under Roman rule in the chaotic, civil war-stricken period of the Late Republic.