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MemberMarlin Blaine

I teach English and Comparative Literature at California State University, Fullerton, with a specialization in the early modern period.  My research focuses mostly on seventeenth-century English literature, with emphases on the intersections of politics and writing and on classical reception.

MemberLucia Martinez

I work primarily in early modern English poetry and non-dramatic prose, with a focus on Reformation politics and poetics; my Master’s thesis is on Donne’s first Satyre as prosopopoeia. My dissertation is titled _Making a Solemn Note: The Music and Meter of English Reformation Psalms_.Current (and ongoing) interests include the lyric poetry of Sidney and Donne, music in Milton, family dynamics in Shakespeare, Spenser’s shorter works and letters, and the science of cognitive poetics. My spare time is occupied by my beagle, Boswell, culinary debacles, penning a DIY column for thehairpin.com, and my violin.BM, Violin Performance, Florida State University (2005); MA, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia (2007); PhD, English Literature, University of Pennsylvania (2014).

MemberSteven Tötösy de Zepetnek

Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek’s http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweblibrary/totosycv areas of scholarship include (comparative) literature and cultural studies; comparative media and communication studies; postcolonial studies; (im)migration and ethnic minority studies; digital humanities (new media and knowledge management); education incl. online education and design; editing and publishing (print & online); film and literature; audience studies; European, US-American, and Canadian cultures and literatures; history; bibliography; and conflict management and diversity training. Education: B.A. history and German studies (U of Western Ontario 1980), M.A. comparative literature (Carleton U 1983), B.Ed. history and English as a second language (U of Ottawa 1984), Ph.D. comparative literature (U of Alberta 1989). Teaching: comparative literature, German, and English U of Alberta 1984-2000; media and communication studies U of Halle-Wittenberg 2002-2011; comparative literature Purdue U 2000-; education & cultural studies Ghent U 2012-; and (distinguished) visiting professorships in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. Publications: single-authored books include Comparative Cultural Studies and the Future of the Humanities (forthcoming); Comparative Literature: Theory, Method, Application; The Social Dimensions of Fiction; edited volumes include Digital Humanities and the Study of Intermediality in Comparative Cultural Studies; Companion to Comparative Literature, World Literatures, and Comparative Cultural Studies; Mapping the World, Culture, and Border-crossing; Perspectives on Identity, Migration, and Displacement; Imre Kertész and Holocaust Literature; Comparative Hungarian Cultural Studies; Comparative Central European Holocaust Studies; The New Central and East European Culture; Comparative Cultural Studies and Michael Ondaatje’s Writing; 200+ articles in peer-reviewed journals; also publications in Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Macedonian, Mara-thi, Polish, Portuguese, and Spanish translation. Editing and publishing 1981-current including series editor of Books in Comparative Cultural Studies (Purdue UP); Books in Comparative Culture, Media, and Communication Studies (Shaker Press); Research Institute for Comparative Literature Book Publishing Programme (U of Alber-ta); editor, CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture (Purdue UP), Canadian Review of Comparative Litera-ture/Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée (Canadian Comparative Literature Association / Association Canadienne de Littérature Comparée), and special issues of various journals. Languages: near-native English, native German and Hungarian, fluent French, reading Latin, Russian, Spanish, Italian.

MemberNicole Marie Gervasio

Nicole Gervasio is a Ph.D. Candidate in English & Comparative Literature with a certificate in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Columbia University. Using postcolonial, feminist, and queer frameworks, her research explores collective trauma, genocide, political violence, human rights, and state repression in contemporary Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone literature from the Global South. Her dissertation, “Arts of the Impossible: Remembering Political Repression in Today’s Decolonial Literatures,” examines the innovative methods by which descendants and witnesses of genocide and dictatorship across the Global South have represented unimaginable political violence. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College with a B.A. in English and Growth & Structure of Cities and has received Beinecke, Javits, Mellon Mays, and Mellon Interdisciplinary Fellowships. A 2015-16 Public Humanities Fellow at Humanities New York, she is founder of the Kaleidoscope Project, a not-for-profit, diversity-based contemporary literature and creative writing workshop for teens in New York City.

MemberLongxi Zhang

Chinese-Western comparative literature; classical Chinese literature and philosophy; cross-cultural studies; world literature. I have published widely in these areas in English and Chinese, and I am interested in the recent development in the study of world literature.