Search

MemberDavid Evans-Powell

Hi!  I’m a part-time doctoral candidate in Film and Television Studies at the University of Birmingham studying folk horror on the British screen. My research interests include:

  • British cinema and television, particularly the horror, science-fiction, telefantasy, thriller, exploitation, comedy and historical genres;
  • British ‘low culture’ on screen;
  • Horror on screen;
  • Topographies, hauntology and psychogeography on screen;
  • History, heritage and landscape on screen;
  • British national identity mediated through film;
  • Genre theory.

MemberLéna Remy-Kovach

My name is Léna Remy-Kovach. I am a Ph.D. Student in North American Indigenous Literatures at the Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, in Germany. I study the notions of healing and (re)conciliation in contemporary Horror and Gothic Indigenous novels. My current projects include the imagery of hunger and cannibalism in contemporary Native horror literature, the commodification of Native American monsters in Horror television series, and the use of traditional Euro-American creatures and tropes in modern Horror by Indigenous writers from Turtle Island.

MemberBrittany R. Roberts

Brittany Roberts earned her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from University of California, Riverside. Her work focuses on 20th- and 21st-century Russian and Anglophone literature and cinema, particularly speculative fiction and the environmental humanities. She is currently preparing her first book, which undertakes a comparative analysis of Russian and Anglophone horror literature and cinema focusing on depictions of humans, animals, the environment, and the ecological and metaphysical dynamics that link them. Brittany has published articles and chapters in The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies, The Spaces and Places of Horror, Plants in Science Fiction: Speculative Vegetation, and the forthcoming collection Fear and Nature: Ecohorror Studies in the Anthropocene. She is especially interested in how horror and other speculative fiction genres disrupt the human-nonhuman binary and in how speculative fiction reconsiders, challenges, and reconceives of our relations with other species.

MemberJesse Alemán

Jesse Alemán is a professor of English and the Director of Literature at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches nineteenth-century American and U.S. Latina/o literary and cultural histories. He also offers classes on the C19 American gothic; southwestern literature and film; and Chicana/o horror. He holds the title of Presidential Teaching Fellow, a distinction awarded for his critical pedagogy at a Hispanic Serving Institution.