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MemberHenry Colburn

My research focuses on the art and archaeology of ancient Iran, and on the regions of the Near East, Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia that interacted with Iran prior to the advent of Islam. I am especially interested in reconstructing the social, cultural, political and even economic environments in which objects were created. I am also interested in how our modern knowledge of the ancient world was created, since this affects how we interpret objects and the conclusions we draw about the people who made them. I have held fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums and the Getty Research Institute, and teaching positions at the University of California, Irvine and the University of Southern California. I am now the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow in Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

MemberCatherine Bonesho

I am currently an Assistant Professor in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. In 2017-2018 I was the Emeline Hill Richardson Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome. I received my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East.

MemberHamish Cameron

In keeping with his research and teaching interests, Hamish Cameron is an itinerant historian hailing from a far-flung colony of a former empire. Thematically, he studies movement, borderlands, networks, geography and imperialism. Geographically, he explores the Eastern Mediterranean, Southwest Asia/the Near East and Rome. Chronologically, he investigates the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Philologically, he enjoys cultural allusions and tricola. No, tetracola… Wait, I’ll come in again… Hamish received his PhD in Classics from the University of Southern California in 2014 where he wrote a dissertation examining the representation of “Mesopotamia” as a borderland in Imperial Roman geographic writing of the first four centuries CE. His monograph on the subject has now been published: Making Mesopotamia: Geography and Empire in a Romano-Iranian Borderland (Brill 2019). He received his MA from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand in 2006 with a thesis on the arrival of Roman power in Cilicia. He also holds a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Science and Technology (2011) from the USC Spatial Sciences Institute. He has participated in two survey seasons in Greece and in specialist conferences on digital geography, borderlands, networks, religion, and Cilicia. Hamish has taught classes in History and Classical Languages dealing with topics from the Bronze Age to the Information Age. He is interested in the applied methodologies of digital humanities, especially digital geography, the digital dissemination of academic information, and the pedagogy of tabletop games. He also designs boardgames and roleplaying games.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberJeffrey A. Becker

Jeffrey Becker is a Mediterranean archaeologist. Becker has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The College of William & Mary, Boston University, McMaster University, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, and the University of Mississippi. Additionally, Becker served as Acting Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of the Pleiades Project and contributing editor for Etruscan and Roman art at Smarthistory.org. Becker is a veteran of archaeological fieldwork in Italy, notably on the Palatine Hill in Rome with Clementina Panella and the University of Michigan’s project at Gabii in Central Italy. He is currently a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at Binghamton University – SUNY. At Binghamton, he teaches courses in Mediterranean archaeology and Graeco-Roman art history.

MemberJody Gordon

Jody Michael Gordon is an Associate Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and an Assistant Director of the Athienou Archaeological Project (AAP). He received his Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati, where his dissertation involved an archaeological study of the effects of imperialism on local identities in Cyprus during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. In addition to working in Cyprus, Jody has excavated in Tunisia, Italy, Spain, and Greece, and his research interests include Roman archaeology, cultural identity, ancient imperialism, and computer applications in archaeology. See here for more on Jody’s teaching at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

MemberNicholas S.M. Matheou

I am a social historian specialising in the Middle East and Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, particularly Anatolia, Upper Mesopotamia and Caucasia (approximately modern-day Turkey, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan, as well as parts of northern Syria and Iraq). In particular my research focuses on the empire of New Rome (“Byzantium”), Armenian and Georgian polities in the central Middle Ages, and the city of Ani, between the ninth to and fourteenth centuries. I also takes a comparative perspective across the region, especially from Kurdish and Ottoman studies, as well as globally, from pre-history to the modern day. Through this research I theorise social-historical themes of hegemony and counterpower, ethnicity and nationhood, and critical political economy before, during and after the rise of capitalism. I aim towards a radical perspective on social history from an anarchist – that is, a methodologically anti-state – standpoint. I received my first degree in Ancient & Medieval History from the University of Edinburgh, before moving to the University of Oxford to complete first a master’s degree in Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, and then a doctoral dissertation in the Faculty of Oriental Studies titled ‘Situating the History attributed to Aristakes Lastiverc‘i: The Empire of New Rome & Caucasia in the Eleventh Century’. During my time as a postgraduate student I co-founded the international research network The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood at The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities (TORCH), running a number of workshops, conferences and seminar series. At the IHR I will focus on developing my doctoral research into a monograph, and begin a new project titled ‘“The Fate of Unjust Cities”: Global History, Political Economy & the Abandoned City of Ani, 900-1400’. This radical global history and political economy of the abandoned city of Ani in central South Caucasia, modern-day eastern Turkey, will situate the city’s emergence, development and decline between the tenth and fourteenth centuries in macro regional and interregional transformations, particularly the Mediterranean Commercial Revolution and the emergent world-system generated by Mongol Eurasian hegemony, in connected micro analysis of developing social relations in the urban space. The project draws on Ani’s rich material remains, particularly the large corpus of monumental epigraphy, as well as numismatics, ceramics and architectural remains, supplemented by Armenian, Georgian, Greek and Islamic (Arabic & Persian) literary sources. Exploring and theorising the political economy of different state-systems, long durée histories of commercial capitalism, and subaltern resistance framed through the heuristics of hegemony and counterpower, the project touches on historical and social themes relevant across time and place.   Normal 0 false false false EN-GB KO X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}