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MemberMartin Munke

I am a historian interested in East-Central and Eastern European History. My focus lies on the relations and entanglements of these areas with the German lands, especially in the Age of Enlightenment and the ‘Age of Extremes’. After several years as research assistant at Chemnitz University of Technology (Institute of European History, Institute of European Studies), I work as head of the divison “Saxonica” (since 2016) and vice head of the department “Manuscripts, Rare Prints, and Saxony” (since 2017) at Saxon State and University Library (SLUB), Dresden.

MemberAgustín Cosovschi

I am a currently a postdoctoral fellow working at the Department of Southeastern European History at Humboldt University in Berlin. My research focuses on the political, cultural and intellectual connections of socialist Yugoslavia to the United States and Latin America during the 1960s. I have a Ph.D in History from the University of San Martín (Argentina) and the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (France). More generally, I am interested in Central and Eastern European history, including Yiddish studies, as well as global intellectual history and studies of political and economic transition.

MemberMartin Brown

Dr Brown holds a Ph.D. in International History from the University of Surrey, and a M. A. in central and eastern European studies from the School Of Slavonic and East European Studies (S.S.E.E.S.) at the University of London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (F.R.Hist.S.), and a member of the New Diplomatic History Network.He is the Associate Dean for Research at Richmond, and a section editor in History for the Open Library of the Humanities.The primary focus of his recent research has been European diplomatic history. He is currently studying British foreign policy during the era of Détente leading up to the Helsinki Final Act of 1975.

MemberAmber Nickell

Amber N. Nickell is a Ph.D. Candidate at Purdue University. Her primary research and teaching field is “Modern Central and Eastern European History”; however, she completed minor preliminary exam fields in “Transnational Germany” and “Russian Imperial Borderlands.”  She earned a Master’s degree in American history (2013) and a Bachelor’s degree in European history (2011) from the University of Northern Colorado. She has presented her work at numerous local, national, and international conferences, workshops, and symposia and received a number of awards for her writing, research, service, and teaching. Additionally, she is a recipient of several research grants and fellowships, including the 2016 Auschwitz Jewish Center Fellowship, Title VIII Grants, and most recently the Fulbright Fellowship (Ukraine). Amber’s training as a scholar of both Europe and the United States enables her to conduct research and teach across these fields. Her methodologies transcend the national, focusing on transnational phenomena, including migration, diaspora, deportation, ethnic cleansing, genocide, human rights, and internationalism. Her command of the spatial humanities augments these strengths. Amber’s most recent publication, “Time to Show the Kremlin America’s Full House: The Committee for Human Rights in the Soviet Union, Rabbi Gedalyah Engel, and their Refusnik Adoptees, 1977-1992,” which appeared in The Transnational Yearbook, Volume 1 (Fairleigh Dickenson, 2018), serves as one example. For more details, see: https://rowman.com/isbn/9781683930037/yearbook-of-transnational-history-(2018)-volume-1 Amber’s current project, tentatively titled “Brotherlands to Bloodlands: Ethnic Germans and Jews in Southern Ukraine, Late Tsarist to Postwar” examines coexistence and confluence between the two groups in territories which now fall in Southern Ukraine and Moldova. She considers the astounding territorial, political, and demographic shifts in the region and ponders their impact on intergroup relationships. In doing so, she illuminates historical processes that transformed interactions between ethnic Germans and their Jewish neighbors from neighborly to murderous.

MemberMarty Mullins

My passions include teaching and Slovakia–a strange combination that has afforded me experience teaching at the secondary level in Slovakia and has led me to complete my Ph.D. in East Central European History in order to publish and teach at the university level. Dr. Manor Mullins earned her Ph.D. at the University of Washington in 2013. A Fulbright Scholar, she conducted research for her dissertation in Kosice, Slovakia, the city where she lived and worked for 7 years. Her published work focuses on the history of Kosice and eastern Slovakia’s experience during the turning points of Czechoslovakia’s postwar history (1948, 1968 and 1989).

MemberJosé M. Faraldo

I am a Profesor Contratado Doctor (assistant professor, tenured) at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM); I have been Ramón-y-Cajal researcher at the UCM (2009-2015). My Ph. Diss in history was at the same university with a work on Russian nationalism. After further studies in history and cultural studies in Moscow, Frankfurt/Oder and Poznań I worked from 1997 to 2002, at the European University Viadrina, in Frankfurt/Oder (Germany). From 2004 to 2008 I was research fellow and project coordinator at the Center of Research on Contemporary History, (Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung, ZZF), in Potsdam (Germany). I have published extensively in English, German, Spanish and Polish languages. Some works: about nationalism in Polish communism (Europe, Nation, Communism. Essays on Poland, New York, Frankfurt 2008), on Europeanism in Socialist countries (Europe in the Eastern Bloc. Imaginations and Discourses, Vienna/Cologne 2008 [with Paulina Gulińska-Jurgiel and Christian Domnitz (Eds.)]), about resistance against fascism and communism in comparison (La Europa Clandestina. La Resistencia contra las ocupaciones nazi y soviética (1938-1948), Madrid 2011); exiles from dictatorships (Reconsidering a Lost Intellectual Project. Exiles’ Reflections on Cultural Differences, CSP 2012 [with Carolina Rodríguez-López (eds.)]), history of Tourism (Introducción a la historia del Turismo, Madrid 2013[with Carolina Rodríguez-López]). My last book has been a critical review of the Russian revolution of 1917 and its memory (La Revolución rusa: historia y memoria, Madrid 2017).

MemberSusan Smith-Peter

Susan Smith-Peter works on Russian history beyond the two capitals of Moscow and St. Petersburg.  Beginning with a study of identity in the provinces of European (or central) Russia, she has branched out to investigate the regional identity of the Russian North and Siberia as well.  Her book, Imagining Russian Regions: Subnational Identity and Civil Society in Nineteenth-Century Russia, was published with Brill in 2018.