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MemberSabina Knight

philosophy and literature in comparative perspective; early Chinese thought and contemporary Chinese fiction; medical humanities; modern and traditional Chinese literature, literature and medicine, comparative literature (Chinese, French, Russian, Japanese, and North American), literary theory, theories of narrative; East Asian humanities; poetry; ecocriticism; nineteenth-, twentieth- and twenty-first-century Russian literature.

MemberDale J. Correa

Dale J. Correa, PhD, is the Middle Eastern Studies Librarian and History Coordinator for the University of Texas Libraries, the University of Texas at Austin. She serves as the liaison to the Department of History, the Department and Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and the Islamic Studies Program. Dr. Correa specializes in Islamic legal theory, theology,  philosophy, and Qur’anic studies, with a particular interest in the intellectual tradition of the eastern regions of the Islamicate empire (namely, Transoxania, which is today in Uzbekistan/Tajikistan). Her research, although rooted in the 10th-12th centuries CE, extends to contemporary conceptions of what it means to be Muslim, particularly in Eurasia. Her current book project examines the development and flourishing of the Transoxanian approach to testimony, or communication: that is, the transmission of knowledge of a past event by agents over time and space. This study brings together Qur’anic exegesis, Islamic legal theory, and Islamic theology with contemporary approaches to epistemology, philosophy of language and the mind, and logic to examine the consequences of positing epistemology as a confessional boundary.

MemberMichael Stanley-Baker

I am an historian of Chinese Medicine and Religion, with a focus first in the early Imperial period, and secondly in contemporary Taiwan, China and Han diasporic communities. I also have a clinical degree in Chinese medicine, and am interested in how healing practices bridge multiple personal, embodied and social dimensions. I am currently writing a book on the emergence of medicine and religion as different but closely related fields of practice in early imperial China, provisionally titled Situating Practice: Medicine and Religion in Early Imperial China. I am also co-editing two other books, the Routledge Handbook of Chinese Medicine and Situating Medicine and Religion Across Asia.  I am project lead on a Digital Humanities project titled Drugs Across Asia. This data-mines the Buddhist, Daoist and medical corpora for data concerning materia medica. This project combines text-marking, statistical analysis, network visualisation and GIS mapping to provide entirely new levels of analysis of pre-modern text corpora, showing the distribution of drug terms across time, space, and textual genre. It is a collaborative venture between the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, National Taiwan University and Dharma Drum Institute for Liberal Arts, with contributors from Fu-jen University, Taipei. The primary toolsets are DocuSky and MARKUS. I also serve as a Vice-President of the International Association for the Study of Asian Medicine (IASTAM), a multi-disciplinary society including history, anthropology, ethno-botany, ethno-pharmacology, public health, clinical trials, and is the only society of its kind to include practitioners. We publish the journal Asian Medicine, host conferences, and are engaged in collaborative research as well as advocacy to global institutions such as the WHO, the Humboldt Forum, and the WHS.