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MemberSamantha Elizabeth Bassler

I am a musicologist specializing in cultural studies of early modern English music, music and disability studies, and the historiography of early music. I am currently pursuing an alternative academic career as an adjunct professor in New York City, a freelance editor and professional indexer, and I own and operate and teach private and small group music lessons at Stellar Music Space in Brooklyn, NYC. I am also a certified yoga teacher specialising in modifications and routines for chronic pain and disabilities.

MemberSteven Vose

Dr. Vose’s main areas for research and teaching are the religious traditions of South Asia, primarily in Jainism and secondarily in Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Islam. He examines the history of interactions within and between these traditions to understand the meaning and contexts of community identity formation, religious authority, and the relationships between religious communities and the state in the medieval and early modern periods. Dr. Vose is interested in devotional practices as public religious expressions, especially pilgrimage and temple ritual; and the place of “tantra” and alchemy in medieval Indian society. Dr. Vose also works on the development of vernacular literary traditions, especially in Old Gujarati, and the interaction of Sanskrit, Prakrit and vernacular languages and literatures. Finally, his work examines architecture, sculpture and manuscript painting practices, especially in western India. More broadly, he is interested in historiography in the study of religion, literary theory and religious reading practices, modern and premodern religious identity politics, religious and ethno-nationalism, conflict and non-violence in South Asia. His early training was primarily anthropological, and he brings a focus on the lived reality of religious life to his study of the medieval and early modern Indian past.

MemberRobyn Dora Radway

I am a historian of Habsburg Central Europe and its imperial entanglements across internal and external borders (1450–1800). I specialize in the study of administrative institutions, scribal practices, book cultures, military conflicts, and material culture. I have published articles and chapters on costume books, arms and armor, dress and identity, Habsburg-Ottoman diplomacy, and the circulation of information on city streets and at imperial courts. I have also worked in several international and local museums with whom I continue to maintain strong ties. In both teaching and research, I seek to combine perspectives from art history with a primary-source-based historical method rooted in both Continental and Anglo-American traditions. Research: I am currently writing a monograph entitled Paper Portraits of Empire: Habsburg Albums from the German House in Constantinople, 1568–1593. The book examines what it meant to be a “Habsburg subject” in the Early Modern period by exploring how a displaced group of men from across Habsburg-ruled territories interacted with one another through their production of a unique set of texts and images. The book brings archival sources together with over 50 manuscripts containing painted images, decorative papers, and friendship albums (alba amicorum) from the Habsburg ambassador’s residence in Constantinople. It engages with debates on the origins of visual archetypes and identification practices in zones of layered sovereignty, as well as questions of deterritorialization and imperial belonging. It also draws on network analysis and the tools of digital humanities to raise further questions on cross-border social relations, human mobility, and the circulation of objects. This project has been generously funded by the Institute for Advanced Study at CEU (2017­–18) and the Gerda Henkel Stifftung (2018–). Teaching: I teach courses on Habsburg history in the longue durée (institutional, political, and cultural history); art history and material culture of the long early modern period (1450–1800); and post-imperial memory politics in public history (19th–21st centuries). I am happy to supervise M.A. and Ph.D. students in these and related subfields.

MemberTravis Seifman

Travis Seifman is a PhD candidate in History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is a historian of early modern (17th-19th c.) Okinawa and Japan. His dissertation research examines the cultural dimensions of official embassies dispatched by the Okinawan kingdom of Lūchū (Ryūkyū) to Tokugawa Japan and Qing China, with a particular focus on the use of costume, music, and other aspects of cultural performance in “performing” status & identity, and on the role of ritual in enacting political relationships. His broader research and teaching interests include Okinawan history and culture (from premodern to contemporary), the history and culture of early modern Japan, Hawaiian and Pacific Island history, art history, and museum studies.

MemberEugenia Zuroski

Eugenia Zuroski has been a member of the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University since 2009. Gena is author of the book A Taste for China: English Subjectivity and the Prehistory of Orientalism (Oxford University Press, 2013), which argues that chinoiserie played an integral role in the formation of modern English subjectivity. Tracing a shift in the relationship between English selves and “things Chinese” from the Restoration through the early nineteenth century, this study shows how both orientalism and privatized subjectivity take shape through cultural processes of disavowing earlier ideals, including cosmopolitanism and aristocratic power. Gena has published articles in Novel: A Forum on Fiction, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Journal18. In addition to teaching courses in literatures and cultures of the long eighteenth century, she teaches introductory level undergraduate courses in short fiction and poetry and one of the core courses in the graduate Cultural Studies and Critical Theory (CSCT) program, “Foundations in CSCT.” In addition to her teaching and research, Gena serves as editor of Eighteenth-Century Fiction, winner of the 2017 CELJ Voyager Award. She has edited special issues of ECF on “Exoticism & Cosmopolitanism” (Fall 2012) and “The Senses of Humour” (Summer 2014). Most recently, she co-edited a 2-part special issue of ECF on “Material Fictions” with Michael Yonan (Dept. of Art History and Archaeology, U of Missouri), published in late 2018 and early 2019. The recipient of a SSHRC Insight Grant, Gena is currently completing a book which argues for the emergence of politically relevant forms of “funniness” in eighteenth-century literature, aesthetics, and subjectivity.  She has been invited to present portions of this project at the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities 18th/19th-Century Colloquium at Vanderbilt University; the Columbia University Seminar in Eighteenth-Century European Culture; the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies Research Seminar at the University of York, UK; the University of East Anglia Research Seminar; and in keynotes for the British Women Writer’s Conference and the David Nichol Smith Seminar. Gena serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Society of Learned Journals, the Executive Board of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Editorial Board of Scholarly and Research Communication, and the Advisory Board of the Hamilton Review of Books. She is currently the faculty co-chair of McMaster’s President’s Advisory Committee on Building an Inclusive Community (PACBIC), and an organizing member of the #BIPOC18 and #Bigger6 collectives. Her first chapbook of poetry, Hovering, Seen, was published by Anstruther Press in 2019.