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MemberFrederick A. De Armas

Early modern studies; Cervantes; Calderon; Lope de Vega; ekphrasis; the relations between the verbal and the visual particularly between Spanish literature and Italian art; the interconnections between myth and empire during the rule of the Habsburgs; the Spanish comedia and the classics; the politics of astrology; magic and the Hermetic tradition; Don Quixote and Moorish culture; Pérez Galdós, early modern Spain and Cuba.

MemberElizabeth Cruz Petersen

Elizabeth Cruz Petersen, Ph.D., holds a Fellow position at the Center for Body, Mind, and Culture at Florida Atlantic University, and an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature. Her research is at the crossroads of cognitive studies (specifically somaesthetics) and early modern Spanish theater and literature. Focusing on the relationship between body, mind, and environment in the context of early modern Spanish performance, her book Women’s Somatic Training in Early Modern Spanish Theater (Routledge, 2016) demonstrates how the early modern Spanish actress subscribed to various somatic practices in an effort to prepare for a role. She is currently working on two research projects: The lives of five women in early modern Spanish Theater who started and ran their own theater enterprises, directing and mentoring another generation of young women entrepreneurs; and the transformation of the witch throughout literary history.

MemberLuna Najera

Areas of interest: Spanish and Latin American cultural studies (early modern and colonial); gender studies; second language acquisition; community engagement. Her journal articles have focused on early modern war, surveillance, gender, and other themes.  Born in Guatemala, she grew up in Los Angeles. She earned a Ph.D. in the Department of Romance Studies at Cornell University, and a B.A. from Hampshire College. Her faculty appointments have included Vassar College, Trinity College, University College Utrecht, and Radboud University (The Netherlands).

MemberMarlena Cravens

My dissertation, Among Aliens Abroad, uncovers the techniques used by the Spanish Empire to translate the indigenous languages and cultures of the New World. It reveals how Spanish colonization depended on erasing and selectively rewriting native languages. My research is supported by the 2019-2020 CLIR/Library of Congress Mellon Dissertation Fellowship in the Humanities in Original Sources, the 2019 Newberry Library Center for Renaissance Studies Consortium Fellowship, and the 2020-2021 University Graduate Continuing Fellowship from the University of Texas.   I draw upon digital resources such as Voyant, Palladio, and Python, as well as physical and digital collections in the Americas and Spain, including John Carter Brown Library, the LLILAS Benson Library, the Harry Ransom Center, the Huntington Library, the National Library of Spain, and the Library of Congress, each of which has important collections containing New World indigenous grammars, dictionaries, travel accounts, translated catechisms, and “histories.”

MemberAlbert Lloret

I am an associate professor of Spanish and Catalan specializing in the literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. My research interests include textual scholarship, cultural history, translation, and the digital humanities. I am the author of Printing Ausiàs March and coauthor of The Classical Tradition in Medieval Catalan. I have edited essay collections on Catalan literature and translation, digital archives and medieval Iberian texts, and the materiality of early modern poetry. My current work includes a critical edition and translation of Giovanni Boccaccio’s geographical dictionary De montibus (in collaboration with Michael Papio), studies of space in lyric poetry, the history of medieval Catalan literature, and the printing of chivalric romance Tirant lo Blanc. I serve as the managing editor of Digital Philology.