Search

MemberFrederick A. De Armas

Early modern studies; Cervantes; Calderon; Lope de Vega; ekphrasis; the relations between the verbal and the visual particularly between Spanish literature and Italian art; the interconnections between myth and empire during the rule of the Habsburgs; the Spanish comedia and the classics; the politics of astrology; magic and the Hermetic tradition; Don Quixote and Moorish culture; Pérez Galdós, early modern Spain and Cuba.

MemberElizabeth Cruz Petersen

Elizabeth Cruz Petersen, Ph.D., holds a Fellow position at the Center for Body, Mind, and Culture at Florida Atlantic University, and an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Languages, Linguistics, and Comparative Literature. Her research is at the crossroads of cognitive studies (specifically somaesthetics) and early modern Spanish theater and literature. Focusing on the relationship between body, mind, and environment in the context of early modern Spanish performance, her book Women’s Somatic Training in Early Modern Spanish Theater (Routledge, 2016) demonstrates how the early modern Spanish actress subscribed to various somatic practices in an effort to prepare for a role. She is currently working on two research projects: The lives of five women in early modern Spanish Theater who started and ran their own theater enterprises, directing and mentoring another generation of young women entrepreneurs; and the transformation of the witch throughout literary history.

MemberLuna Najera

My research focuses on war, gender, and subjectivity in early modern Spanish thought, as well as visual culture, cultural studies, and book history in colonial Spanish America. Other research interests that I pursue through course offerings include: urban studies, border studies, gender studies, postcolonial theory and literature, modern and postmodern theory.

MemberAlbert Lloret

I am an associate professor of Spanish and Catalan specializing in the literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. My research interests include textual scholarship, cultural history, translation, and the digital humanities. I am the author of Printing Ausiàs March and coauthor of The Classical Tradition in Medieval Catalan. I have edited essay collections on Catalan literature and translation, digital archives and medieval Iberian texts, and the materiality of early modern poetry. My current work includes a critical edition and translation of Giovanni Boccaccio’s geographical dictionary De montibus (in collaboration with Michael Papio), studies of space in lyric poetry, the history of medieval Catalan literature, and the printing of chivalric romance Tirant lo Blanc. I serve as the managing editor of Digital Philology.

MemberKathryn Vomero Santos

Kathryn Vomero Santos specializes in early modern literature and culture, translation studies, and gender and sexuality studies. She is currently writing a book entitled “Babelian Performances: Early Modern Interpreters and the Theatricality of Translation,” which explores the intersections between early modern English theater and the performative practices of translating in real time between speakers of different languages in a wide range of social, cultural, economic, and political domains.   She co-edited Arthur Golding’s A Moral Fabletalk and Other Renaissance Fable Translations with Liza Blake for the MHRA Tudor & Stuart Translations Series (2017) and has published in Philological Quarterly and in a collection entitled Shakespeare and Immigration. Her public-facing writing has appeared in Shakespeare Quarterly’s new digital space and in CNN Opinion. She is currently completing essays for several forthcoming collections, including The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Animals (eds. Holly Dugan and Karen Raber), Lesser Living Creatures: Insect Life in the Renaissance (eds. Keith Botelho and Joseph Campana), and Latinx Shakespeare: Performance, Appropriation, and Pedagogy (eds. Trevor Boffone, Carla Della Gatta, and Katherine Gillen). Her research and teaching have been supported by grants and fellowships from the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, UCLA Special Collections, the Renaissance Society of America, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She was recently elected to serve as the Translation Studies delegate for the Modern Language Association.