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MemberMelanie Marshall

…Edited Books

Melanie L. Marshall, Linda L. Carroll and Katherine A. McIver (eds.), Sexualities, Textualities, Art and Music in Early Modern Italy. Aldershot, UK and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 

Iddon, Martin and Melanie L. Marshall (eds.), Lady Gaga and Popular Music: Performing Gender, Fashion and Culture. New York: Routledge, 2014.

Articles and Chapters

Marshall, Melanie L. ‘Voce Bianca: Purity and Whiteness in British Early Music Vocality.’ Women and Music : A Journal of Gender & Culture, 19 (2015), 36-44.

Marshall, Melanie L. ‘Imitating the Rustic and Revealing the Noble: Masculine Power and Music at the Court of Ferrara.’ In Eroticism in Early Modern Music, e…

Melanie is a musicologist with research and teaching interests in gender, sexuality and eroticism in music, and music of early modern Italy. Since joining University College Cork in 2005, Melanie has taught at undergraduate and postgraduate levels within the Music Department and on interdisciplinary programs within the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences. From 2011-2014, Melanie held a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship to conduct research into music and eroticism in early modern Rome. During the fellowship, Melanie spent six months as a Visiting Scholar at UCLA Department of Musicology and eighteen months as a Visiting Scholar at NYU Department of Music. Melanie is also a Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Music, Gender and Identity at the University of Huddersfield.

Memberkatrina

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. Her PhD thesis (University of Melbourne, 2011) focused on the relationship between garden design and theatre in Early Modern Italy. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas. Her main project is Digital Cartographies of the Roman Campagna, which is operating in collaboration with the British School at Rome. This project brings together historical maps with modern mapping technologies to recreate the lost landscape of the Roman Campagna, and draw together data and research from a variety of disciplines, including art and architectural history, social history, cultural geography and the history of climate and ecological change.

MemberLeon Chisholm

…Monograph project

Keyboard Playing and the Reconceptualization of Polyphony in Early Modern Italy

Other current research

Timbral slippage: the organo di legno and the modern sound of Italian Baroque music

Collaborative projects

since 2019:

Epistemic Dissonances. Objects and Tools of Early Modern Acoustics (subproject of Sonderforschungsbereich (Collaborative Research Center) 980 “Episteme in Motion” @ Freie Universität Berlin

Epistemes of Modern Acoustics, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (Berlin)

2016-19:

Materiality of Musical Instruments, Deutsches Museum (Munich) (Funded by Leibniz Association)

2018:

The Keyboard as a Musical Interface: Material…

Leon Chisholm studied applied music and musicology in Canada and the United States, obtaining a PhD in historical musicology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2015. His dissertation research, funded in part by the Cini Foundation in Venice, concerned the mechanization of polyphonic vocal idioms brought about by the rise of lute and keyboard playing in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Italy. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Humboldt University Berlin, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and of CRC 980, “Epistemes in Motion,” at the Free University Berlin. Previously, he held postdoctoral fellowships at the Deutsches Museum in Munich and the Italian Academy at Columbia University. Leon is currently at work on projects concerning the social construction of timbre in organ building and the material origins of musical style and concepts in early modern Europe. His book project Keyboard Playing and the Reconceptualization of Polyphonic Music in Early Modern Italy investigates how seminal changes in the concept and structure of polyphony were rooted in a shift of praxis defined by the increasing role of keyboard instruments in composition, teaching, theory, performance, and rehearsal. In addition to his academic research, Leon is a practicing musician specializing in organs and historical keyboards. He is also co-editor of the blog for the History of Music Theory group of the American Musicological Society and the Society for Music Theory.

MemberKatrina Grant

Katrina Grant is an art historian with a background in the study of Early Modern Italy. Her research focuses on gardens and the history of landscapes, as well as the visual culture of theatre and festivals, and the connections between these two areas. She has published on the gardens of Lucca, history of emotions and set design, and artistic relationships between Britain and Italy in the eighteenth century. She has run the popular Melbourne Art Network website as editor and webmaster since 2010 and she is a founding editor of the online open-access art history journal emaj (emajartjournal.com). She is currently a lecturer at the Australian National University in the Centre for Digital HUmanities Research. She is also in charge of Marketing and Communications for the Art Association of Australia and New Zealand (AAANZ). She also has a background in educational research, including the use of new technologies for learning and assessment and worked as a Research Fellow at the Australian Council for Educational Research for several years. Her current research focuses on GIS and visualisation technologies and their potential for extending art historical research into new areas.

MemberSabrina Ferri

Sabrina Ferri is Associate Professor of Italian at the University of Notre Dame. Her research encompasses Italian literature, philosophy, science and visual arts of the so-called “long eighteenth century,” with a focus on the transition to modernity and Italy’s place in transnational contexts. Her work on Giacomo Casanova, Lazzaro Spallanzani, the late eighteenth-century Picturesque, Vittorio Alfieri, Giambattista Vico, and Giacomo Leopardi has appeared in several peer-reviewed journals. Her first book, Ruins Past: Modernity in Italy, 1744-1836, was published in the Voltaire Foundation’s series “Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment” in 2015. Through the analysis of the representation of ruins by Italian writers, scientists, and artists between the mid-eighteenth and early nineteenth century, Ruins Past explores the culture of the period and traces Italy’s uneasy transition into modernity. She is currently working on Giacomo Leopardi and on two long-term projects. The first, Fantasy’s Forge. Brain and the Imagination between Enlightenment and Romanticism, focuses on Italian writers and scientists between the mid-18th and the early 19th century, and seeks to tell the interdisciplinary story of a crucial moment in the history of the imagination, when science, poetry, and philosophy converged to reshape the understanding of this faculty. The second, Revolutionary States and the Ends of Fiction. History, Italy, and the Novel (1799-1967), is a study of the representation of historical change and in particular of political revolutions in novels set in Italy during the late 18th and 19th centuries.

MemberUmberto Grassi

…and A. Lynch, London/New York, Routledge, 2010, pp. 133-150.
U. Grassi, “Il frutto proibito. Eresia, emozioni e peccato originale nell’Italia moderna,” in “Infami macchie”. Sessualità maschili e indisciplina fra XVII e XVIII secolo, edited by F. Alfieri and V. Lagioia, Roma: Viella, 2017 (The Forbidden Fruit: Heresy, emotions and Original Sin in Early Modern Italy), pp. 51-86.
Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals
U. Grassi, “Ambiguous Boundaries: Sex Crimes and Cross-Cultural Encounters in the Early Modern Mediterranean World,” Studi e Materiali di Storia delle Religioni 84.2 (2018), pp. 513-528
U. Grassi, “Sex and Toleration: New Perspectives of Research on Religious Radical Dissent in Early…

Among many other things (!) I identify as a historian specializing in the history of religion and sexuality in the Early Modern Mediterranean world. I graduated and completed my PHD at the University of Pisa (Italy) with a thesis on homosexuality in Renaissance Italy. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa within the FIRB project “Beyond the Holy War” I moved to Australia for 2 and a half years, where I worked at the University of Sydney as a postdoctoral research associate for the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. The current research project brought me to the United States, at The University of Maryland, where I am staying for two years before going back to the University of Verona, the Institution that is carrying out the action. I am enjoying a wonderful time at UMD’s History Department, a welcoming and stimulating work environment that is helping me focus on my research objectives and understand how things works in a US University. When I will be back to Italy, I will continue my work within PoliTeSse (Politics and Theories of Sexuality), the first institutionalized research center working on Gender and Sexuality studies in Italy.

MemberPaula Sofia Hohti

I am a historian of material culture, fashion, and everyday life, and an assistant professor of the History of Art and Culture at Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Helsinki. Since I gained by my PhD at the University of Sussex in 2006, supervised by Evelyn Welch, I have held positions at Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, the European University in Florence, Bard Graduate Centre in New York and Center for Textile Research in Copenhagen. I have been a principal investigator in two international projects, The Material Renaissance: Costs and Consumption in Italy 1350-1600 and Fashioning the Early Modern: Creativity and Innovation in Europe, 1500-1800. In 2016, I received a 2m euro ERC grant to study early modern popular fashions and historical and digital reconstruction as a methodology for dress historians.