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MemberKatherine Cross

I am a historian of the Early Middle Ages interested in ethnic identity, religious conversion, and comparative approaches. I have just published my first book, Heirs of the Vikings: History and Identity in Normandy and England, c. 950 – c. 1015 (YMP, 2018), and recently co-curated Imagining the Divine: Art and the Rise of World Religions at the Ashmolean Museum. I am currently Postdoctoral Researcher on the Empires of Faith project at the British Museum, and I teach early medieval history at the University of Oxford.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberTamar Rotman

I am a historian of late antique and early medieval history, interested in the role of hagiography and the cults of saints in the cultural and social history of their time. In my PhD dissertation, I have examined the hagiographical corpus of Gregory of Tours and showed that three of his hagiographical works (the Glory of the Martyrs, the Glory of the Confessors, and the Vita Paturm) were actually meant to be read together as an ecclesiastical history. This history, I argue, helped Gregory to construct a Gallo-Christian identity for the people living in sixth-century Merovingian Gaul. My current research examines Gregory of Tours’ autobiographical anecdotes in his historiographical and hagiographical works and aims at showing how Gregory tried to write his own hagiography and construct his future cult as a saint.

MemberSarah Bond

I am an Associate Professor in the Classics Department at the University of Iowa. I am interested in Roman, late antique, and early medieval history, archaeology, topography and GIS, Digital Humanities, and the role of Classics in pop culture (e.g., Game of Thrones). I obtained a BA in Classics and History with a minor in Classical Archaeology from the University of Virginia (2005). My PhD is in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2011). My book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professionals in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press (October, 2016) and looks at the lives of marginalized tradesmen like gravediggers and tanners. Follow me on Twitter @SarahEBond, read my Blog, or email me at sarah-bond@uiowa.edu .

MemberHelen Lawson

Helen Lawson’s doctoral thesis, ‘Navigating Northumbria: Mobility, Allegory and Writing Travel in Early Medieval Northumbria’, considers the narrational and theological role of travel and mobility in Northumbrian histories and hagiographies. This work originally stemmed from the idea that scholarship on early medieval northern Britain tends to underestimate, or reject outright, the role of land transport in early medieval mobility. Whilst the original starting point was focussed on the practice and practicalities of travel, the thesis has shifted to interrogate the conceptual role of travel in the milieu of Bede and his contemporaries.