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MemberBegonya Cayuela

Dr Begoña Cayuela is a PhD in Art History at the Universitat of Barcelona with the dissertation entitled «Tradiciones y transmisión iconográfica en el arte altomedieval. La iconografía del sacrificio de Isaac en el arte hispánico (siglos VII al XII)» (online at http://www.tdx.cat/handle/10803/129907). Her areas of specialization are Early Medieval Art and Iconography. She is a member of the Research Group of the University of Barcelona, Ars Picta (http://www.arspicta.net). Alongside her career as an independent researcher, she is a programmer with more than 20 years of experience. Her skills include working with databases such as MS Access and SQL Server, software and web programming. This mixed interest, the Digital World and the Medieval Art, has led her to create a Facebook page to collect resources and news about medieval art. Medieval Art is the name of this fan page and is available at the address: https://www.facebook.com/MedievalArt. There is also a companion Twitter account: https://twitter.com/MedievalArt1.

MemberGiovanni Gasbarri

Postdoctoral Fellow (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Center for the Study of Christianity, October 2017) Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow (University of Toronto, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, September 2016) Postdoc in History of Medieval Art (Università di Urbino “Carlo Bo”, Urbino, March 2016) Visiting Professor (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, 2015-2016) Teaching Fellow (Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome) Postdoc in History of Medieval Art (Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, 2014-2015) Phd in History of Byzantine Art (Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, June 2013) Webmaster for the official website of AISB – Associazione Italiana di Studi Bizantini http://www.studibizantini.it — RESEARCH INTERESTS — * Medieval art and architecture in Italy; * Early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval ivory carvings; * Byzantine book illumination; visual rhetoric and relation between text and image; * History of Medieval and Byzantine studies at the turn of the twentieth century; * Impact of the Grand Tour on the rediscovery of medieval and Byzantine art between the 18th and the 19th centuries; * Fakes, forgeries, copies; * Collections and collectors of early Christian, Byzantine and Medieval works of art.

MemberSam Barber

I study the material and visual cultures of late ancient and early medieval Europe, with a special focus on iconographies and architectures of authority in the post-Roman successor states. My doctoral dissertation investigates palaces between the time of Tetrarchy and that of the Carolingians. Though a constant across this period, palaces underwent dramatic changes architecturally, conceptually, and institutionally. By viewing them simultaneously as physical architecture, as social spaces, and as nodes in ‘royal landscapes’, I use palaces as a lens for examining shifting concepts of rulership and legitimate authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. In doing so I argue that they were not simple assertions of Roman-derived sovereignty, but rather essential instruments in the reordering of political space in the post-Roman West. In addition to my dissertation, I am also interested in the history of medieval art (including its historiography); urban studies and architectural theory; and concepts of identity, ethnicity, and community in the Early Middle Ages.

MemberOlivia Richmond

I’m in my fourth year in History at Carleton. I moved to Ottawa three years ago from Kitchener, ON. This year, I am developing digital history skills by working with my classmates on digitizing Late Medieval folio pages and learning the mystic arts involved in digital codicology. My usual interests include medieval women, medieval Christianity and monasticism , disability studies, and sexuality and gender. This year I am working on an Honours research project, which will be a year long endeavour into late medieval convents, considering what images they were exposed to and how the cloister impacted the lives of the nuns living there.

MemberKatherine Cross

I am a historian of the Early Middle Ages interested in ethnic identity, religious conversion, and comparative approaches. I have just published my first book, Heirs of the Vikings: History and Identity in Normandy and England, c. 950 – c. 1015 (YMP, 2018), and recently co-curated Imagining the Divine: Art and the Rise of World Religions at the Ashmolean Museum.

MemberElizabeth N. Emery

My research interests include medieval and nineteenth-century French literature and cultural studies, the reception of medieval art, architecture, and literature in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe and America, early photojournalism, celebrity interviews, European and American writer house museums, naturalism, decadence, mysticism, cabaret culture, nineteenth-century French theater, the collection and study of Asian art in nineteenth-century France, and global food politics and sustainability studies. I teach a variety of courses from Beginning French I to advanced French language, literature, and culture courses with particular emphasis on the medieval period and the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I currently serve as Book Review Coeditor for the journal Nineteenth-Century French Studies and as a board member of the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association.

MemberValerie Billing

Valerie Billing is Assistant Professor of English at Central College, where she teaches courses in Shakespeare, medieval and early modern English literature, world literature, LGBTQ+ literature, and disability literature. She holds a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Early Modern English Literature from the University of California, Davis. Valerie’s current research project investigates the erotics of size in a range of early modern drama, poetry, prose, and visual art.

MemberHilary Jane Locke

I’m a recent Masters graduate, living in Sydney. My Master of Philosophy degree focused on the presence of chivalry and courtly love in the courts of Henry VII and Henry VIII. And I wish to undertake a PhD, starting in 2019, exploring the relationship between historical fiction and the public’s perceptions of history.  I have taught courses on medieval and early modern religious history as well as revolutions in history. My research interests are Tudor England, medievalism, and historical popular culture and their depictions of the past.