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MemberNadia Nurhussein

My work focuses on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century African American literature and culture, especially poetry. In my first book, Rhetorics of Literacy: The Cultivation of American Dialect Poetry (The Ohio State University Press, 2013), I argued that dialect poetry functioned in the turn-of-the-century US in surprising ways, challenging readers’ expectations of a light and entertaining subgenre. My current book project considers African American literary and cultural views of the politics of imperial Ethiopia from the 1860s to the 1930s, particularly as expressed in newspapers and magazines, reflecting an interest in periodical studies that has informed my research throughout my career.

MemberAndrew Newman

Originally from Queens, NY, I’ve been teaching at Stony Brook since 2005. I’m the author of Allegories of Encounter: Colonial Literacy and Indian Captivities (2019) and On Records: Delaware Indians, Colonists, and the Media of History and Memory (2012). As a 2019 Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, I’m working on a cultural history of high school English, The High School Canon: Reading Across Generations. Please contact me at andrew.newman@stonybrook.edu.

MemberKent Navalesi

I am a PhD candidate in History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I specialize in Late Antiquity with particular research interests in the religious uses of literacy in the early barbarian kingdoms. My dissertation, tentatively titled “Venantius Fortunatus and the Literary Promotion of Saints’ Cults inSixth-Century Gaul,” examines the prose hagiography of Fortunatus and the ways they engage contemporary discourses on salvation and pastoral care. I am also hoping to publish the first English translation of the heretofore untranslated Fortunatan prose lives. CV here.

MemberElizabeth Hutton

Lizzie Hutton is Assistant Professor of English and Director of the Howe Writing Center at Miami University, Ohio, where she works with Elizabeth Wardle. Lizzie’s current book project, Textual Transactions: Engaging Reading-Writing in Higher Education, offers an integrative theory of reading-writing for the context of the college classroom and interrogates prevailing U.S. higher education paradigms that position reading and writing as properly separable fields of study. More specifically, her book reanimates the work of Louise Rosenblatt, using Rosenblatt’s early career to make a case for a more pragmatically integrated model for building culturally sensitive literacy knowledge–including both writing studies and literary studies—in the humanities.

MemberMegan Beckerich

I am a current MA student at the University of Chicago in the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities. I completed by thesis in 2018, and am continuing my Japanese language education. My thesis discussed censorship and gendered supernatural bodies in early Meiji period Japanese prints, and the influence of globalization and modernization had on the perception of such images. My interests include folklore, censorship in art, print history, Japan studies, and material culture studies. I have served on a student curatorial committee at the University of Chicago, contributing two labels to a small exhibit on the prints of Felix Buhot. Currently I am interning at the Cincinnati Art Museum as a Photography Conservation and Curation Intern. My main projects are working with Meiji period ambrotypes, and cyanotypes from the William Howard Taft diplomatic mission to Asia in 1905.