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MemberCatherine Bonesho

I am currently the Assistant Professor of Early Judaism in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East. Specifically, I am interested in the ways ancient Jews navigated living under imperial domination through the development of legislation and rhetoric about the Other. I am currently working on my first monograph, The Festivals of the Gentiles in Early Judaism. My research also concentrates on the Roman Near East and Semitic languages, especially Aramaic, and their use in imperial contexts. In particular, I investigate the material presentation of Aramaic inscriptions found throughout the Roman Empire. I have authored translation and paleographic articles on Palmyrene Aramaic inscriptions as one of the founding members of the Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscription Project in journals including Maarav and KUSATU. I spent the 2017-2018 academic year in Rome as a Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (FAAR ‘18). I earned my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies (2018) and my MA in Hebrew and Semitic Studies (2014) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

MemberDavid A. Burnett

David A. Burnett has completed doctoral coursework toward a PhD in Religious Studies in Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity at Marquette University. He has served as a graduate teaching assistant and research assistant in the Department of Theology at Marquette. He has also studied at Tantur Ecumenical Institute of the University of Notre Dame in Jerusalem, Israel and Oxford University. His work has been published with Fortress Academic/Lexington Press and in the Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters. His research interests include early Jewish apocalyptic, esoteric, and mystical traditions within the reception and interpretation of scripture in the Second Temple period and the integral role these traditions play in the study of Christian origins. More specifically, he is interested in the origins and development of early Jewish and Christian deification and angelomorphic traditions, the development of Messianism and Christology, and apocalyptic eschatology and resurrection beliefs in Early Judaism and Christian origins. His current research agenda focuses on tracing these streams of tradition in Pauline literature and thought, Luke-Acts, and the exploration and (re)description of the parting of the ways between early Judaism and Christianity.

MemberMeredith Warren


2013 PhD New Testament and Early Judaism; minor, Ancient Mediterranean Religions, McGill University, Faculty of Religious Studies

2006 MA New Testament, McGill University, Faculty of Religious Studies

2004 BA with distinction Anthropology and Religious Studies, McGill University, Faculty of Arts

Principally trained in both early Christianity and early Judaism, I approach religion in antiquity from an interdisciplinary perspective that challenges category assumptions about early Christian and Jewish literature. In my research and teaching, my goal is to showcase the intricacies of shared cosmological expectations among the communities of the ancient Mediterranean. I write about the intersection of cultural expectations in narratives from the Greco-Roman period, across religious boundaries, especially narrative-level rituals. My first book, My Flesh is Meat Indeed (Fortress; 2015) evaluates how John 6:51c–58 contributes to the gospel’s presentation of Jesus as divine in light of Hellenistic attitudes about sacrifice, divinity, and the consumption of human flesh. My next book-length project, Hierophagy: Transformational Eating in Ancient Literature, explores how performative consumption effects transformation in ancient Mediterranean narratives.

MemberDaniel Glover

I’m a Ph.D. student in New Testament at Baylor University. My research interests include the Gospel of Mark, narrative and redaction criticism, early Christian and Jewish use of the Old Testament, and the the relation of Judaism and Christianity in the first four centuries. In addition to reading and writing, my hobbies include playing tennis, guitar, and disc golf.

MemberPhillip Webster

I use the study of early forms of Christianity and Judaism to tease out the applications and potentialities of various theoretical approaches and questions, including those inspired by “New Materialism,” Feminist, Transgender, and Queer Theory, M. Foucault, phenomenology, and Science and Technology Studies. My book project examines references to the soul in Greek and Roman antiquity, with the aim of exploring the effects, functions, and power of the ancient soul’s phantom-like presence upon ancient bodies. In my teaching, I like to introduce my students to big, interdisciplinary questions through the study of early Christian and Jewish histories and their receptions in modernity.

MemberDavid Skelton

…Review of Judith Newman’s Before the Bible: The Liturgical Body and the Formation of Scriptures in Early Judaism for Ancient Jew Review. https://www.ancientjewreview.com/articles/2019/6/16/book-note-before-the-bible-the-liturgical-body-and-the-formation-of-scriptures-in-early-judaism#_ftnref5

The Wisdom of Ben Sira according to the Syriac Peshitta Version with English Translation. Antioch Bible Series. Piscataway, NJ: Gorgias Press (with Blake Jurgens, Jacob Lollar). Forthcoming.

“Angels Among Us…

David Skelton has a PhD in Religions of Western Antiquity from Florida State with an emphasis in the Second Temple period. His dissertation was on music and pedagogy in Ben Sira and the Dead Sea Scrolls. He is currently teaching courses on the survey of the Hebrew Bible and the Prophets. His research concerns the book of Ben Sira, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Syriac Christianity. More specifically, he is interested in the use of prayer and music as a means of creating identity as well the pedagogical use of music in Early Jewish and Christian communities.  

MemberTravis Proctor

I am an Assistant Professor of Religion at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio. I teach courses in Christian Origins & History, Religion & Gender, Religion & Nature, and the interrelated histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. My current research explores early Christian theorizations of nonhuman bodies – particularly those of evil “demons” – and how such conceptualizations impacted the construction and ritual performance of the early Christian body. My other research interests include topics in gender/sexuality studies, ecocriticism, posthumanism, and ritual studies.

MemberMatthew Goldstone

Research My book, The Dangerous Duty of Rebuke: Leviticus 19:17 in Early Jewish and Christian Interpretation (Brill, 2018), examines the ways in which religious leaders within early Jewish and Christian communities conceived of the obligation to rebuke their fellows based upon the biblical verse: “Do not hate your kinsfolk in your heart, rebuke your fellow but do not incur sin” (Leviticus 19:17).  Analyzing texts from the Bible through the Talmud and late midrashim as well as early Christian monastic writings, I expose a shift from asking how to rebuke in the Second Temple period, to whether one can rebuke in early rabbinic texts, to whether one should rebuke in later rabbinic and monastic sources. My next project, tentatively titled Propaganda, Deception, and Censorship: The Rabbinic Production of Knowledge, explores the manifold ways through which the rabbis of late antiquity fabricate history and law. Drawing upon insights from propaganda studies, trauma and postcolonial theory, as well as rhetorical criticism, this project examines rabbinic literature as a microcosm for understanding the partisan construction and dissemination of knowledge in the ancient world.